What does fall mean?

Definitions for fall
fɔlfall

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word fall.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. fall, autumnnoun

    the season when the leaves fall from the trees

    "in the fall of 1973"

  2. spill, tumble, fallnoun

    a sudden drop from an upright position

    "he had a nasty spill on the ice"

  3. Fallnoun

    the lapse of mankind into sinfulness because of the sin of Adam and Eve

    "women have been blamed ever since the Fall"

  4. descent, declivity, fall, decline, declination, declension, downslopenoun

    a downward slope or bend

  5. fallnoun

    a lapse into sin; a loss of innocence or of chastity

    "a fall from virtue"

  6. fall, downfallnoun

    a sudden decline in strength or number or importance

    "the fall of the House of Hapsburg"

  7. fallnoun

    a movement downward

    "the rise and fall of the tides"

  8. capitulation, fall, surrendernoun

    the act of surrendering (usually under agreed conditions)

    "they were protected until the capitulation of the fort"

  9. twilight, dusk, gloaming, gloam, nightfall, evenfall, fall, crepuscule, crepusclenoun

    the time of day immediately following sunset

    "he loved the twilight"; "they finished before the fall of night"

  10. fall, pinnoun

    when a wrestler's shoulders are forced to the mat

  11. drop, fallnoun

    a free and rapid descent by the force of gravity

    "it was a miracle that he survived the drop from that height"

  12. drop, dip, fall, free fallverb

    a sudden sharp decrease in some quantity

    "a drop of 57 points on the Dow Jones index"; "there was a drop in pressure in the pulmonary artery"; "a dip in prices"; "when that became known the price of their stock went into free fall"

  13. fallverb

    descend in free fall under the influence of gravity

    "The branch fell from the tree"; "The unfortunate hiker fell into a crevasse"

  14. descend, fall, go down, come downverb

    move downward and lower, but not necessarily all the way

    "The temperature is going down"; "The barometer is falling"; "The curtain fell on the diva"; "Her hand went up and then fell again"

  15. fallverb

    pass suddenly and passively into a state of body or mind

    "fall into a trap"; "She fell ill"; "They fell out of favor"; "Fall in love"; "fall asleep"; "fall prey to an imposter"; "fall into a strange way of thinking"; "she fell to pieces after she lost her work"

  16. fall, comeverb

    come under, be classified or included

    "fall into a category"; "This comes under a new heading"

  17. precipitate, come down, fallverb

    fall from clouds

    "rain, snow and sleet were falling"; "Vesuvius precipitated its fiery, destructive rage on Herculaneum"

  18. fallverb

    suffer defeat, failure, or ruin

    "We must stand or fall"; "fall by the wayside"

  19. fallverb

    die, as in battle or in a hunt

    "Many soldiers fell at Verdun"; "Several deer have fallen to the same gun"; "The shooting victim fell dead"

  20. fall, shine, strikeverb

    touch or seem as if touching visually or audibly

    "Light fell on her face"; "The sun shone on the fields"; "The light struck the golden necklace"; "A strange sound struck my ears"

  21. fallverb

    be captured

    "The cities fell to the enemy"

  22. fallverb

    occur at a specified time or place

    "Christmas falls on a Monday this year"; "The accent falls on the first syllable"

  23. decrease, diminish, lessen, fallverb

    decrease in size, extent, or range

    "The amount of homework decreased towards the end of the semester"; "The cabin pressure fell dramatically"; "her weight fell to under a hundred pounds"; "his voice fell to a whisper"

  24. fallverb

    yield to temptation or sin

    "Adam and Eve fell"

  25. fallverb

    lose office or power

    "The government fell overnight"; "The Qing Dynasty fell with Sun Yat-sen"

  26. fallverb

    to be given by assignment or distribution

    "The most difficult task fell on the youngest member of the team"; "The onus fell on us"; "The pressure to succeed fell on the youngest student"

  27. fallverb

    move in a specified direction

    "The line of men fall forward"

  28. fallverb

    be due

    "payments fall on the 1st of the month"

  29. fallverb

    lose one's chastity

    "a fallen woman"

  30. fallverb

    to be given by right or inheritance

    "The estate fell to the oldest daughter"

  31. accrue, fallverb

    come into the possession of

    "The house accrued to the oldest son"

  32. fall, lightverb

    fall to somebody by assignment or lot

    "The task fell to me"; "It fell to me to notify the parents of the victims"

  33. fall, return, pass, devolveverb

    be inherited by

    "The estate fell to my sister"; "The land returned to the family"; "The estate devolved to an heir that everybody had assumed to be dead"

  34. fallverb

    slope downward

    "The hills around here fall towards the ocean"

  35. fall, fall downverb

    lose an upright position suddenly

    "The vase fell over and the water spilled onto the table"; "Her hair fell across her forehead"

  36. fallverb

    drop oneself to a lower or less erect position

    "She fell back in her chair"; "He fell to his knees"

  37. hang, fall, flowverb

    fall or flow in a certain way

    "This dress hangs well"; "Her long black hair flowed down her back"

  38. fallverb

    assume a disappointed or sad expression

    "Her face fell when she heard that she would be laid off"; "his crest fell"

  39. fallverb

    be cast down

    "his eyes fell"

  40. fallverb

    come out; issue

    "silly phrases fell from her mouth"

  41. fallverb

    be born, used chiefly of lambs

    "The lambs fell in the afternoon"

  42. fallverb

    begin vigorously

    "The prisoners fell to work right away"

  43. fallverb

    go as if by falling

    "Grief fell from our hearts"

  44. fall, descend, settleverb

    come as if by falling

    "Night fell"; "Silence fell"

Wiktionary

  1. fallnoun

    The act of moving in a fluid or vacuum under the effect of gravity to a lower position.

    Etymology: From fallen, from feallan, from fallanan, from pōl-. Cognate with falle, vallen, fallen, falla, pulti, σφάλλω.

  2. fallnoun

    A reduction in quantity, pitch, etc.

    Etymology: From fallen, from feallan, from fallanan, from pōl-. Cognate with falle, vallen, fallen, falla, pulti, σφάλλω.

  3. fallnoun

    autumn.

    Etymology: From fallen, from feallan, from fallanan, from pōl-. Cognate with falle, vallen, fallen, falla, pulti, σφάλλω.

  4. fallnoun

    A loss of greatness or status.

    the fall of Rome

    Etymology: From fallen, from feallan, from fallanan, from pōl-. Cognate with falle, vallen, fallen, falla, pulti, σφάλλω.

  5. fallnoun

    The action of a batsman being out.

    Etymology: From fallen, from feallan, from fallanan, from pōl-. Cognate with falle, vallen, fallen, falla, pulti, σφάλλω.

  6. fallnoun

    A defect in the ice which causes stones thrown into an area to drift in a given direction

    Etymology: From fallen, from feallan, from fallanan, from pōl-. Cognate with falle, vallen, fallen, falla, pulti, σφάλλω.

  7. fallnoun

    Blame or punishment for a failure or misdeed.

    He set up his rival to take the fall.

    Etymology: From fallen, from feallan, from fallanan, from pōl-. Cognate with falle, vallen, fallen, falla, pulti, σφάλλω.

  8. fallnoun

    The part of the rope of a tackle to which the power is applied in hoisting.

    Etymology: From fallen, from feallan, from fallanan, from pōl-. Cognate with falle, vallen, fallen, falla, pulti, σφάλλω.

  9. fallnoun

    See falls

    Etymology: From fallen, from feallan, from fallanan, from pōl-. Cognate with falle, vallen, fallen, falla, pulti, σφάλλω.

  10. fallverb

    To move to a lower position under the effect of gravity.

    Thrown from a cliff, the stone fell 100 feet before hitting the ground.

    Etymology: From fallen, from feallan, from fallanan, from pōl-. Cognate with falle, vallen, fallen, falla, pulti, σφάλλω.

  11. fallverb

    To come down, to drop or descend.

    The rain fell at dawn.

    Etymology: From fallen, from feallan, from fallanan, from pōl-. Cognate with falle, vallen, fallen, falla, pulti, σφάλλω.

  12. fallverb

    To come to the ground deliberately, to prostrate oneself.

    He fell to the floor and begged for mercy.

    Etymology: From fallen, from feallan, from fallanan, from pōl-. Cognate with falle, vallen, fallen, falla, pulti, σφάλλω.

  13. fallverb

    To be brought to the ground.

    Etymology: From fallen, from feallan, from fallanan, from pōl-. Cognate with falle, vallen, fallen, falla, pulti, σφάλλω.

  14. fallverb

    To collapse; to be overthrown or defeated.

    Rome fell to the Goths in 410 AD.

    Etymology: From fallen, from feallan, from fallanan, from pōl-. Cognate with falle, vallen, fallen, falla, pulti, σφάλλω.

  15. fallverb

    To die, especially in battle.

    This is a monument to all those who fell in the First World War.

    Etymology: From fallen, from feallan, from fallanan, from pōl-. Cognate with falle, vallen, fallen, falla, pulti, σφάλλω.

  16. fallverb

    To be allotted to; to arrive through chance or fate.

    And so it falls to me to make this important decision.

    Etymology: From fallen, from feallan, from fallanan, from pōl-. Cognate with falle, vallen, fallen, falla, pulti, σφάλλω.

  17. fallverb

    To become lower (in quantity, pitch, etc).

    The candidate's poll ratings fell abruptly after the banking scandal.

    Etymology: From fallen, from feallan, from fallanan, from pōl-. Cognate with falle, vallen, fallen, falla, pulti, σφάλλω.

  18. fallverb

    To become; to be affected by or befallen with a calamity; to change into the state described by words following; to become prostrated literally or figuratively .

    Our senator fell into disrepute because of the banking scandal.

    Etymology: From fallen, from feallan, from fallanan, from pōl-. Cognate with falle, vallen, fallen, falla, pulti, σφάλλω.

  19. fallverb

    To become.

    She has fallen ill.

    Etymology: From fallen, from feallan, from fallanan, from pōl-. Cognate with falle, vallen, fallen, falla, pulti, σφάλλω.

  20. fallverb

    To cause something to descend to the ground (to drop it); especially to cause a tree to descend to the ground by cutting it down (felling it).

    Etymology: From fallen, from feallan, from fallanan, from pōl-. Cognate with falle, vallen, fallen, falla, pulti, σφάλλω.

  21. Fallnoun

    The sudden fall of humanity into a state of sin, as brought about by the transgression of Adam and Eve.

    Etymology: From fallen, from feallan, from fallanan, from pōl-. Cognate with falle, vallen, fallen, falla, pulti, σφάλλω.

  22. Fallnoun

    The time of the year when the leaves typically fall from the trees; autumn; the season of the year between the autumnal equinox in late September to the winter solstice in late December.

    Etymology: From fallen, from feallan, from fallanan, from pōl-. Cognate with falle, vallen, fallen, falla, pulti, σφάλλω.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Fallverb

    to Descend, either suddenly or gradually; particularly, to descend by the force of gravity; to drop; to sink; as, the apple falls; the tide falls; the mercury falls in the barometer

    Etymology: [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr. sfa`llein to cause to fall, Skr. sphal, sphul, to tremble. Cf. Fail, Fell, v. t., to cause to fall.]

  2. Fallverb

    to cease to be erect; to take suddenly a recumbent posture; to become prostrate; to drop; as, a child totters and falls; a tree falls; a worshiper falls on his knees

    Etymology: [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr. sfa`llein to cause to fall, Skr. sphal, sphul, to tremble. Cf. Fail, Fell, v. t., to cause to fall.]

  3. Fallverb

    to find a final outlet; to discharge its waters; to empty; -- with into; as, the river Rhone falls into the Mediterranean

    Etymology: [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr. sfa`llein to cause to fall, Skr. sphal, sphul, to tremble. Cf. Fail, Fell, v. t., to cause to fall.]

  4. Fallverb

    to become prostrate and dead; to die; especially, to die by violence, as in battle

    Etymology: [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr. sfa`llein to cause to fall, Skr. sphal, sphul, to tremble. Cf. Fail, Fell, v. t., to cause to fall.]

  5. Fallverb

    to cease to be active or strong; to die away; to lose strength; to subside; to become less intense; as, the wind falls

    Etymology: [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr. sfa`llein to cause to fall, Skr. sphal, sphul, to tremble. Cf. Fail, Fell, v. t., to cause to fall.]

  6. Fallverb

    to issue forth into life; to be brought forth; -- said of the young of certain animals

    Etymology: [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr. sfa`llein to cause to fall, Skr. sphal, sphul, to tremble. Cf. Fail, Fell, v. t., to cause to fall.]

  7. Fallverb

    to decline in power, glory, wealth, or importance; to become insignificant; to lose rank or position; to decline in weight, value, price etc.; to become less; as, the falls; stocks fell two points

    Etymology: [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr. sfa`llein to cause to fall, Skr. sphal, sphul, to tremble. Cf. Fail, Fell, v. t., to cause to fall.]

  8. Fallverb

    to be overthrown or captured; to be destroyed

    Etymology: [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr. sfa`llein to cause to fall, Skr. sphal, sphul, to tremble. Cf. Fail, Fell, v. t., to cause to fall.]

  9. Fallverb

    to descend in character or reputation; to become degraded; to sink into vice, error, or sin; to depart from the faith; to apostatize; to sin

    Etymology: [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr. sfa`llein to cause to fall, Skr. sphal, sphul, to tremble. Cf. Fail, Fell, v. t., to cause to fall.]

  10. Fallverb

    to become insnared or embarrassed; to be entrapped; to be worse off than before; asm to fall into error; to fall into difficulties

    Etymology: [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr. sfa`llein to cause to fall, Skr. sphal, sphul, to tremble. Cf. Fail, Fell, v. t., to cause to fall.]

  11. Fallverb

    to assume a look of shame or disappointment; to become or appear dejected; -- said of the countenance

    Etymology: [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr. sfa`llein to cause to fall, Skr. sphal, sphul, to tremble. Cf. Fail, Fell, v. t., to cause to fall.]

  12. Fallverb

    to sink; to languish; to become feeble or faint; as, our spirits rise and fall with our fortunes

    Etymology: [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr. sfa`llein to cause to fall, Skr. sphal, sphul, to tremble. Cf. Fail, Fell, v. t., to cause to fall.]

  13. Fallverb

    to pass somewhat suddenly, and passively, into a new state of body or mind; to become; as, to fall asleep; to fall into a passion; to fall in love; to fall into temptation

    Etymology: [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr. sfa`llein to cause to fall, Skr. sphal, sphul, to tremble. Cf. Fail, Fell, v. t., to cause to fall.]

  14. Fallverb

    to happen; to to come to pass; to light; to befall; to issue; to terminate

    Etymology: [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr. sfa`llein to cause to fall, Skr. sphal, sphul, to tremble. Cf. Fail, Fell, v. t., to cause to fall.]

  15. Fallverb

    to come; to occur; to arrive

    Etymology: [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr. sfa`llein to cause to fall, Skr. sphal, sphul, to tremble. Cf. Fail, Fell, v. t., to cause to fall.]

  16. Fallverb

    to begin with haste, ardor, or vehemence; to rush or hurry; as, they fell to blows

    Etymology: [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr. sfa`llein to cause to fall, Skr. sphal, sphul, to tremble. Cf. Fail, Fell, v. t., to cause to fall.]

  17. Fallverb

    to pass or be transferred by chance, lot, distribution, inheritance, or otherwise; as, the estate fell to his brother; the kingdom fell into the hands of his rivals

    Etymology: [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr. sfa`llein to cause to fall, Skr. sphal, sphul, to tremble. Cf. Fail, Fell, v. t., to cause to fall.]

  18. Fallverb

    to belong or appertain

    Etymology: [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr. sfa`llein to cause to fall, Skr. sphal, sphul, to tremble. Cf. Fail, Fell, v. t., to cause to fall.]

  19. Fallverb

    to be dropped or uttered carelessly; as, an unguarded expression fell from his lips; not a murmur fell from him

    Etymology: [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr. sfa`llein to cause to fall, Skr. sphal, sphul, to tremble. Cf. Fail, Fell, v. t., to cause to fall.]

  20. Fallverb

    to let fall; to drop

    Etymology: [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr. sfa`llein to cause to fall, Skr. sphal, sphul, to tremble. Cf. Fail, Fell, v. t., to cause to fall.]

  21. Fallverb

    to sink; to depress; as, to fall the voice

    Etymology: [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr. sfa`llein to cause to fall, Skr. sphal, sphul, to tremble. Cf. Fail, Fell, v. t., to cause to fall.]

  22. Fallverb

    to diminish; to lessen or lower

    Etymology: [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr. sfa`llein to cause to fall, Skr. sphal, sphul, to tremble. Cf. Fail, Fell, v. t., to cause to fall.]

  23. Fallverb

    to bring forth; as, to fall lambs

    Etymology: [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr. sfa`llein to cause to fall, Skr. sphal, sphul, to tremble. Cf. Fail, Fell, v. t., to cause to fall.]

  24. Fallverb

    to fell; to cut down; as, to fall a tree

    Etymology: [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr. sfa`llein to cause to fall, Skr. sphal, sphul, to tremble. Cf. Fail, Fell, v. t., to cause to fall.]

  25. Fallnoun

    the act of falling; a dropping or descending be the force of gravity; descent; as, a fall from a horse, or from the yard of ship

    Etymology: [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr. sfa`llein to cause to fall, Skr. sphal, sphul, to tremble. Cf. Fail, Fell, v. t., to cause to fall.]

  26. Fallnoun

    the act of dropping or tumbling from an erect posture; as, he was walking on ice, and had a fall

    Etymology: [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr. sfa`llein to cause to fall, Skr. sphal, sphul, to tremble. Cf. Fail, Fell, v. t., to cause to fall.]

  27. Fallnoun

    death; destruction; overthrow; ruin

    Etymology: [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr. sfa`llein to cause to fall, Skr. sphal, sphul, to tremble. Cf. Fail, Fell, v. t., to cause to fall.]

  28. Fallnoun

    downfall; degradation; loss of greatness or office; termination of greatness, power, or dominion; ruin; overthrow; as, the fall of the Roman empire

    Etymology: [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr. sfa`llein to cause to fall, Skr. sphal, sphul, to tremble. Cf. Fail, Fell, v. t., to cause to fall.]

  29. Fallnoun

    the surrender of a besieged fortress or town ; as, the fall of Sebastopol

    Etymology: [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr. sfa`llein to cause to fall, Skr. sphal, sphul, to tremble. Cf. Fail, Fell, v. t., to cause to fall.]

  30. Fallnoun

    diminution or decrease in price or value; depreciation; as, the fall of prices; the fall of rents

    Etymology: [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr. sfa`llein to cause to fall, Skr. sphal, sphul, to tremble. Cf. Fail, Fell, v. t., to cause to fall.]

  31. Fallnoun

    a sinking of tone; cadence; as, the fall of the voice at the close of a sentence

    Etymology: [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr. sfa`llein to cause to fall, Skr. sphal, sphul, to tremble. Cf. Fail, Fell, v. t., to cause to fall.]

  32. Fallnoun

    declivity; the descent of land or a hill; a slope

    Etymology: [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr. sfa`llein to cause to fall, Skr. sphal, sphul, to tremble. Cf. Fail, Fell, v. t., to cause to fall.]

  33. Fallnoun

    descent of water; a cascade; a cataract; a rush of water down a precipice or steep; -- usually in the plural, sometimes in the singular; as, the falls of Niagara

    Etymology: [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr. sfa`llein to cause to fall, Skr. sphal, sphul, to tremble. Cf. Fail, Fell, v. t., to cause to fall.]

  34. Fallnoun

    the discharge of a river or current of water into the ocean, or into a lake or pond; as, the fall of the Po into the Gulf of Venice

    Etymology: [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr. sfa`llein to cause to fall, Skr. sphal, sphul, to tremble. Cf. Fail, Fell, v. t., to cause to fall.]

  35. Fallnoun

    extent of descent; the distance which anything falls; as, the water of a stream has a fall of five feet

    Etymology: [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr. sfa`llein to cause to fall, Skr. sphal, sphul, to tremble. Cf. Fail, Fell, v. t., to cause to fall.]

  36. Fallnoun

    the season when leaves fall from trees; autumn

    Etymology: [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr. sfa`llein to cause to fall, Skr. sphal, sphul, to tremble. Cf. Fail, Fell, v. t., to cause to fall.]

  37. Fallnoun

    that which falls; a falling; as, a fall of rain; a heavy fall of snow

    Etymology: [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr. sfa`llein to cause to fall, Skr. sphal, sphul, to tremble. Cf. Fail, Fell, v. t., to cause to fall.]

  38. Fallnoun

    the act of felling or cutting down

    Etymology: [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr. sfa`llein to cause to fall, Skr. sphal, sphul, to tremble. Cf. Fail, Fell, v. t., to cause to fall.]

  39. Fallnoun

    lapse or declension from innocence or goodness. Specifically: The first apostasy; the act of our first parents in eating the forbidden fruit; also, the apostasy of the rebellious angels

    Etymology: [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr. sfa`llein to cause to fall, Skr. sphal, sphul, to tremble. Cf. Fail, Fell, v. t., to cause to fall.]

  40. Fallnoun

    formerly, a kind of ruff or band for the neck; a falling band; a faule

    Etymology: [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr. sfa`llein to cause to fall, Skr. sphal, sphul, to tremble. Cf. Fail, Fell, v. t., to cause to fall.]

  41. Fallnoun

    that part (as one of the ropes) of a tackle to which the power is applied in hoisting

    Etymology: [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr. sfa`llein to cause to fall, Skr. sphal, sphul, to tremble. Cf. Fail, Fell, v. t., to cause to fall.]

Freebase

  1. Fall

    Fall is the title of American country music singer Clay Walker's ninth album. It was released April 17, 2007, on Asylum-Curb Records. The album's first single was "'Fore She Was Mama", which reached #21 on the Hot Country Songs charts in mid-2007. Following this song was the title track, which reached #5 on the same chart and became Walker's first Top Five country hit since "The Chain of Love" in 2000. "Fall" was also covered by Kimberley Locke, whose own version was a single as well. The third and final single from this album, "She Likes It in the Morning", peaked at #43. Also included is a cover of Freddy Fender's "Before the Next Teardrop Falls", recorded here as a duet with Fender. This cover is also Walker's first duet.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Fall

    fawl, v.i. to drop down: to descend by the force of gravity: to become prostrate: (of a river) to discharge itself: to slope down: to sink as if dead: to vanish: to die away: to lose strength, subside: to decline in power, wealth, value, or reputation: to be overthrown: to be compelled to yield: to become downcast: to sink into sin, to yield to temptation: to depart from the faith: to become dejected: to pass gently into any state, as 'to fall in love,' 'to fall asleep:' to befall: to issue, occur: to enter upon with haste or vehemence: to rush: to be dropped in birth: to be required or necessary: to fall away:—pr.p. fall′ing; pa.t. fell; pa.p. fallen (faw′ln).n. the act of falling, in any of its senses: descent by gravity, a dropping down: that which falls—a trap-door, &c.: as much as comes down at one time, as 'a fall of snow,' &c.: overthrow: death: descent from a better to a worse position: slope or declivity: descent of water: a cascade: length of a fall: outlet of a river: decrease in value: a sinking of the voice: the time when the leaves fall, autumn: a bout at wrestling: the yielding of a city or stronghold to the enemy: that which falls: a lapse into sin, esp. that of Adam and Eve, called 'the Fall:' a kind of collar worn in the 17th century.—adj. Fall′en, in a degraded state, ruined.—ns. Fall′ing, that which falls; Fall′ing-band (see Band); Fall′ing-sick′ness, epilepsy; Fall′ing-star, a meteor; Fall′ing-stone, a portion of an exploded meteor; Fall′trank, a medicine compounded of certain aromatic and astringent Swiss plants, of repute for accidents; Fall′-trap, a trap which operates by falling.—Fall-a, to begin; Fall across, to meet by chance; Fall among, to come into the midst of; Fall away, to decline gradually, to languish: to grow lean: to revolt or apostatise; Fall back, to retreat, give way; Fall back, fall edge, no matter what may happen; Fall back upon, to have recourse to some expedient or resource in reserve; Fall behind, to slacken, to be outstripped; Fall flat, to fail completely, as a shopman in attracting attention or purchasers, a new book, &c.; Fall foul, to come in collision: to quarrel (with of); Fall in (with), to concur or agree: to comply: to place themselves in order, as soldiers; Fall off, to separate or be broken: to die away, to perish: to revolt or apostatise; Fall on, to begin eagerly: to make an attack: to meet; Fall on one's feet, to come well out of a difficulty, to gain any unexpected good fortune; Fall out, to quarrel: to happen or befall; Fall over (Shak.), to go over to the enemy; Fall short, to be deficient (with of); Fall through, to fail, come to nothing; Fall to, to begin hastily and eagerly: to apply one's self to; Fall upon, to attack: to attempt: to rush against.—Try a fall, to take a bout at wrestling. [A.S. feallan; Ger. fallen; prob. conn. with L. fallĕre, to deceive.]

  2. Fall

    fawl, n. the cry given when a whale is sighted, or harpooned: the chase of a whale.—Loose fall, the losing of a whale. [Prob. from the north-eastern Scotch pronunciation of whale.]

Dictionary of Nautical Terms

  1. fall

    A vertical descent of a river through a narrow rocky pass, or over a ledge, to the impediment of navigation. Also, the loose end of a tackle, or that part to which the power is applied in hoisting, and on which the people pull. Also, in ship-building, the descent of a deck from a fair-curve lengthwise, as frequently seen in merchantmen and yachts, to give height to the commander's cabin, and sometimes forward at the hawse-holes. Also, a large cutting down of timber. Also, North American English for autumn, when the navigation of northern inland waters is about to close till the succeeding spring.

Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

  1. fall

    The surrender or capture of a place after it has been besieged.

  2. fall

    The rope rove through blocks, used with gins and shears for raising weights, and with the crab for moving them.

  3. fall

    The descent of a body by the attraction of the earth.

Suggested Resources

  1. fall

    Song lyrics by fall -- Explore a large variety of song lyrics performed by fall on the Lyrics.com website.

  2. FALL

    What does FALL stand for? -- Explore the various meanings for the FALL acronym on the Abbreviations.com website.

Etymology and Origins

  1. Fall

    An Americanism for autumn, in allusion to the fall of the leaves.

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'fall' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #1526

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'fall' in Written Corpus Frequency: #1415

  3. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'fall' in Nouns Frequency: #922

  4. Verbs Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'fall' in Verbs Frequency: #80

How to pronounce fall?

How to say fall in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of fall in Chaldean Numerology is: 6

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of fall in Pythagorean Numerology is: 4

Examples of fall in a Sentence

  1. Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.:

    Carve every word before you let it fall.

  2. State Department:

    The U.S. government currently has less than 20 active cases that fall under the authority of PPD 30 [Presidential Policy Directive --Hostage Recovery Activities put in place in June 2015].

  3. Alessio Fasano:

    CORONAVIRUS IN THE US : STATE-BY-STATE BREAKDOWN The researchers found although children are less likely to get severely ill with the virus, they can easily spread it to vulnerable adults in their lives, especially if theyre in school. Roberta DeBiasi added that, based on other respiratory illnesses, children are known spreaders. The researchers also studied a rare infection that can result in heart problems fromthe childs immune response to the virus. This is a severe complication as a result of the immune response to COVID-19 infection, and the number of these patients is growing, and, as in adults with these very serious systemic complications, the heart seems to be the favorite organ targeted by post-COVID-19 immune response. She said the immune response complication should factor into vaccine production strategy. The researchers recommend wearing masks, social distancing, hand washing, a combination of in-person and remote learning and frequent testing if returning to school in the fall.

  4. L.F. Magister:

    Never expect to achieve tomorrow what you can get today. Different of the fruits that fall alone, the sky can never be achieved in the same way.

  5. Teri Lesesne:

    It's a stunning, first-person narrative from this character with a crazy life, she's a good student who doesn't want to fall in love and lose herself. From the realistic voice to the rhythms of her language -- I felt like I knew her.

Images & Illustrations of fall

  1. fallfallfallfallfall

Popularity rank by frequency of use

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Translations for fall

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    declare untrue; contradict
    • A. aggravate
    • B. deny
    • C. doom
    • D. refine

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