What does faith mean?

Definitions for faith
feɪθfaith

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word faith.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. religion, faith, religious beliefnoun

    a strong belief in a supernatural power or powers that control human destiny

    "he lost his faith but not his morality"

  2. faith, trustnoun

    complete confidence in a person or plan etc

    "he cherished the faith of a good woman"; "the doctor-patient relationship is based on trust"

  3. religion, faith, organized religionnoun

    an institution to express belief in a divine power

    "he was raised in the Baptist religion"; "a member of his own faith contradicted him"

  4. faithnoun

    loyalty or allegiance to a cause or a person

    "keep the faith"; "they broke faith with their investors"

GCIDE

  1. Faithnoun

    That which is believed on any subject, whether in science, politics, or religion; especially (Theol.), a system of religious belief of any kind; as, the Jewish or Muslim faith; the Christian faith; also, the creed or belief of a Christian society or church.

    Etymology: [OE. feith, fayth, fay, OF. feid, feit, fei, F. foi, fr. L. fides; akin to fidere to trust, Gr. pei`qein to persuade. The ending th is perhaps due to the influence of such words as truth, health, wealth. See Bid, Bide, and cf. Confide, Defy, Fealty.]

Wiktionary

  1. faithnoun

    A feeling, conviction, or belief that something is true or real, without having evidence.

    Etymology: 12th century, from feith, from feid, from fides (whence also English fidelity), from fido, ultimately from bʰidʰ-, zero-grade of bʰeydʰ- (whence also English bide).

  2. faithnoun

    A religious belief system.

    The Christian faith.

    Etymology: 12th century, from feith, from feid, from fides (whence also English fidelity), from fido, ultimately from bʰidʰ-, zero-grade of bʰeydʰ- (whence also English bide).

  3. faithnoun

    An obligation of loyalty or fidelity and the observance of such an obligation.

    He acted in good faith to restore broken diplomatic ties after defeating the incumbent.

    Etymology: 12th century, from feith, from feid, from fides (whence also English fidelity), from fido, ultimately from bʰidʰ-, zero-grade of bʰeydʰ- (whence also English bide).

  4. faithnoun

    A trust or confidence in the intentions or abilities of a person, object, or ideal.

    I have faith in the goodness of my fellow man.

    Etymology: 12th century, from feith, from feid, from fides (whence also English fidelity), from fido, ultimately from bʰidʰ-, zero-grade of bʰeydʰ- (whence also English bide).

  5. Faithnoun

    A female given name from English.

    "Now, I was called Faith after the cardinal virtue; and I like my name, though many people would think it too Puritan; that was according to our gentle mother's pious desire.

  6. Faithnoun

    A city in South Dakota.

Wikipedia

  1. Faith

    Faith, derived from Latin fides and Old French feid, is confidence or trust in a person, thing, or concept. In the context of religion, one can define faith as "belief in God or in the doctrines or teachings of religion". Religious people often think of faith as confidence based on a perceived degree of warrant, while others who are more skeptical of religion tend to think of faith as simply belief without evidence.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Faithnoun

    belief; the assent of the mind to the truth of what is declared by another, resting solely and implicitly on his authority and veracity; reliance on testimony

    Etymology: [OE. feith, fayth, fay, OF. feid, feit, fei, F. foi, fr. L. fides; akin to fidere to trust, Gr. pei`qein to persuade. The ending th is perhaps due to the influence of such words as truth, health, wealth. See Bid, Bide, and cf. Confide, Defy, Fealty.]

  2. Faithnoun

    the assent of the mind to the statement or proposition of another, on the ground of the manifest truth of what he utters; firm and earnest belief, on probable evidence of any kind, especially in regard to important moral truth

    Etymology: [OE. feith, fayth, fay, OF. feid, feit, fei, F. foi, fr. L. fides; akin to fidere to trust, Gr. pei`qein to persuade. The ending th is perhaps due to the influence of such words as truth, health, wealth. See Bid, Bide, and cf. Confide, Defy, Fealty.]

  3. Faithnoun

    the belief in the historic truthfulness of the Scripture narrative, and the supernatural origin of its teachings, sometimes called historical and speculative faith

    Etymology: [OE. feith, fayth, fay, OF. feid, feit, fei, F. foi, fr. L. fides; akin to fidere to trust, Gr. pei`qein to persuade. The ending th is perhaps due to the influence of such words as truth, health, wealth. See Bid, Bide, and cf. Confide, Defy, Fealty.]

  4. Faithnoun

    the belief in the facts and truth of the Scriptures, with a practical love of them; especially, that confiding and affectionate belief in the person and work of Christ, which affects the character and life, and makes a man a true Christian, -- called a practical, evangelical, or saving faith

    Etymology: [OE. feith, fayth, fay, OF. feid, feit, fei, F. foi, fr. L. fides; akin to fidere to trust, Gr. pei`qein to persuade. The ending th is perhaps due to the influence of such words as truth, health, wealth. See Bid, Bide, and cf. Confide, Defy, Fealty.]

  5. Faithnoun

    that which is believed on any subject, whether in science, politics, or religion; especially (Theol.), a system of religious belief of any kind; as, the Jewish or Mohammedan faith; and especially, the system of truth taught by Christ; as, the Christian faith; also, the creed or belief of a Christian society or church

    Etymology: [OE. feith, fayth, fay, OF. feid, feit, fei, F. foi, fr. L. fides; akin to fidere to trust, Gr. pei`qein to persuade. The ending th is perhaps due to the influence of such words as truth, health, wealth. See Bid, Bide, and cf. Confide, Defy, Fealty.]

  6. Faithnoun

    fidelity to one's promises, or allegiance to duty, or to a person honored and beloved; loyalty

    Etymology: [OE. feith, fayth, fay, OF. feid, feit, fei, F. foi, fr. L. fides; akin to fidere to trust, Gr. pei`qein to persuade. The ending th is perhaps due to the influence of such words as truth, health, wealth. See Bid, Bide, and cf. Confide, Defy, Fealty.]

  7. Faithnoun

    word or honor pledged; promise given; fidelity; as, he violated his faith

    Etymology: [OE. feith, fayth, fay, OF. feid, feit, fei, F. foi, fr. L. fides; akin to fidere to trust, Gr. pei`qein to persuade. The ending th is perhaps due to the influence of such words as truth, health, wealth. See Bid, Bide, and cf. Confide, Defy, Fealty.]

  8. Faithnoun

    credibility or truth

    Etymology: [OE. feith, fayth, fay, OF. feid, feit, fei, F. foi, fr. L. fides; akin to fidere to trust, Gr. pei`qein to persuade. The ending th is perhaps due to the influence of such words as truth, health, wealth. See Bid, Bide, and cf. Confide, Defy, Fealty.]

  9. Faith

    by my faith; in truth; verily

    Etymology: [OE. feith, fayth, fay, OF. feid, feit, fei, F. foi, fr. L. fides; akin to fidere to trust, Gr. pei`qein to persuade. The ending th is perhaps due to the influence of such words as truth, health, wealth. See Bid, Bide, and cf. Confide, Defy, Fealty.]

Freebase

  1. Faith

    Faith is confidence or trust in a person, thing, deity, or in the doctrines or teachings of a religion. It is also belief that is not based on proof. In religion, faith often involves accepting claims about the character of a deity, nature, or the universe. While some have argued that faith is opposed to reason, proponents of faith argue that the proper domain of faith concerns questions which cannot be settled by evidence. For example, faith can be applied to predictions of the future, which has not yet occurred. The word faith is often used as a substitute for hope, trust or belief.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Faith

    fāth, n. trust or confidence in any person: belief in the statement of another: belief in the truth of revealed religion: confidence and trust in God: the living reception by the heart of the truth as it is in Christ: that which is believed: any system of religious belief, esp. the religion one considers true—'the faith;' fidelity to promises: honesty: word or honour pledged.—adjs. Faithed (Shak.), credited; Faith′ful, full of faith, believing: firm in adherence to promises, duty, allegiance, &c.: loyal: conformable to truth: worthy of belief: true.—adv. Faith′fully, sincerely, truthfully, exactly.—ns. Faith′fulness; Faith′-heal′ing, a system of belief based on James, v. 14, that sickness may be treated without any medical advice or appliances, if the prayer of Christians be accompanied in the sufferer by true faith.—adj. Faith′less, without faith or belief: not believing, esp. in God or Christianity: not adhering to promises, allegiance, or duty: delusive.—adv. Faith′lessly.—ns. Faith′lessness; Faith′worthiness, trustworthiness.—adj. Faith′worthy, worthy of faith or belief.—Bad faith, treachery.—Father of the faithful, Abraham: the caliph.—In good faith, with sincerity.—The Faithful, believers. [M. E. feith, feyth—O. Fr. feid—L. fidesfidĕre, to trust.]

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Faith

    in its proper spiritual sense and meaning is a deep-rooted belief affecting the whole life, that the visible universe in every section of it, particularly here and now, rests on and is the manifestation of an eternal and an unchangeable Unseen Power, whose name is Good, or God.

The Roycroft Dictionary

  1. faith

    1. The effort to believe that which your commonsense tells you is not true. 2. The first requisite in success.

The Foolish Dictionary, by Gideon Wurdz

  1. FAITH

    A mental accomplishment whereby an ear-ache becomes a Symphony Concert, a broken finger a diamond ring and a "touch" an invitation to dine.

Editors Contribution

  1. faith

    The intuitive feeling, knowing and understanding in our brain, heart, mind, subconscious, soul, spirit, conscience and consciousness that every human being is a divine being on earth and are accountable, responsible and contributing to the cocreation of what manifests on planet earth as we are a united team.

    Our faith is in each other, our unity, solidarity, cohesion, love, passion and motivation for optimum health, human rights and shared prosperity for all on planet earth.

    Submitted by MaryC on April 25, 2020  
  2. faith

    To trust the intention, ability or truth of a person.

    Our faith in each other and our collective unity for the benefit of all is what sustains our life on this planet.

    Submitted by MaryC on February 15, 2020  
  3. faith

    Trust the ability, feeling, power, knowing or understanding.

    Our faith in ourselves and others throughout society is vital and we use that faith to live in harmony and balance with nature, animals and humans together.

    Submitted by MaryC on February 15, 2020  

Suggested Resources

  1. faith

    Song lyrics by faith -- Explore a large variety of song lyrics performed by faith on the Lyrics.com website.

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'faith' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #2048

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'faith' in Written Corpus Frequency: #1695

  3. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'faith' in Nouns Frequency: #869

How to pronounce faith?

How to say faith in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of faith in Chaldean Numerology is: 1

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of faith in Pythagorean Numerology is: 8

Examples of faith in a Sentence

  1. Alexis de Tocqueville, Democracy in America, author Alexis de Tocqueville:

    Liberty cannot be established without morality, nor morality without faith.

  2. Martin Luther:

    If he have faith, the believer cannot be restrained. He betrays himself. He breaks out. He confesses and teaches this gospel to the people at the risk of life itself.

  3. Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson:

    Have faith that his difficult and unnecessary situation will be resolved.

  4. Jeff Sessions:

    In recent years, the cultural climate has become less hospitable to people of faith and to religious belief. Many Americans have felt that their freedom to practice their faith has been under attack.

  5. Jonathan Adams:

    It was a challenge at first when we signed up -- when you're signing papers that say, 'This is not insurance,' you're stepping out on faith. But we use faith every day.

Images & Illustrations of faith

  1. faithfaithfaithfaithfaith

Popularity rank by frequency of use

faith#1#2241#10000

Translations for faith

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

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