What does exploit mean?

Definitions for exploit
ˈɛk splɔɪt, ɪkˈsplɔɪtex·ploit

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word exploit.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. feat, effort, exploitverb

    a notable achievement

    "he performed a great feat"; "the book was her finest effort"

  2. exploit, workverb

    use or manipulate to one's advantage

    "He exploit the new taxation system"; "She knows how to work the system"; "he works his parents for sympathy"

  3. exploit, tapverb

    draw from; make good use of

    "we must exploit the resources we are given wisely"

  4. overwork, exploitverb

    work excessively hard

    "he is exploiting the students"

Wiktionary

  1. exploitnoun

    A heroic or extraordinary deed.

  2. exploitnoun

    A program or technique that exploits a vulnerability in other software.

  3. exploitverb

    To use for one's own advantage.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Exploitnoun

    a deed or act; especially, a heroic act; a deed of renown; an adventurous or noble achievement; as, the exploits of Alexander the Great

    Etymology: [OE. esploit success, OF. esploit, espleit,revenue, product, vigor, force, exploit, F. exploit exploit, fr. L. explicitum, prop. p. p. neut. of explicare to unfold, display, exhibit; ex + plicare to fold. See Ply, and cf. Explicit, Explicate.]

  2. Exploitnoun

    combat; war

    Etymology: [OE. esploit success, OF. esploit, espleit,revenue, product, vigor, force, exploit, F. exploit exploit, fr. L. explicitum, prop. p. p. neut. of explicare to unfold, display, exhibit; ex + plicare to fold. See Ply, and cf. Explicit, Explicate.]

  3. Exploitnoun

    to utilize; to make available; to get the value or usefulness out of; as, to exploit a mine or agricultural lands; to exploit public opinion

    Etymology: [OE. esploit success, OF. esploit, espleit,revenue, product, vigor, force, exploit, F. exploit exploit, fr. L. explicitum, prop. p. p. neut. of explicare to unfold, display, exhibit; ex + plicare to fold. See Ply, and cf. Explicit, Explicate.]

  4. Exploitnoun

    hence: To draw an illegitimate profit from; to speculate on; to put upon

    Etymology: [OE. esploit success, OF. esploit, espleit,revenue, product, vigor, force, exploit, F. exploit exploit, fr. L. explicitum, prop. p. p. neut. of explicare to unfold, display, exhibit; ex + plicare to fold. See Ply, and cf. Explicit, Explicate.]

Freebase

  1. Exploit

    An exploit is a piece of software, a chunk of data, or sequence of commands that takes advantage of a bug, glitch or vulnerability in order to cause unintended or unanticipated behaviour to occur on computer software, hardware, or something electronic. Such behavior frequently includes such things as gaining control of a computer system or allowing privilege escalation or a denial-of-service attack.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Exploit

    eks-ploit′, n. a deed or achievement, esp. an heroic one: a feat.—v.t. to work up: to utilise for one's own ends.—adj. Exploit′able.—ns. Exploit′age, Exploitā′tion, the act of successfully applying industry to any object, as the working of mines, &c.: the act of using for selfish purposes. [O. Fr. exploit—L. explicitum, ended.]

The New Hacker's Dictionary

  1. exploit

    [originally cracker slang] 1. A vulnerability in software that can be used for breaking security or otherwise attacking an Internet host over the network. The Ping O' Death is a famous exploit. 2. More grammatically, a program that exploits an exploit in sense 1.

Matched Categories

British National Corpus

  1. Verbs Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'exploit' in Verbs Frequency: #632

How to pronounce exploit?

How to say exploit in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of exploit in Chaldean Numerology is: 6

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of exploit in Pythagorean Numerology is: 2

Examples of exploit in a Sentence

  1. President Barack Obama:

    We have the opportunity, I think, to lessen those tensions and to lift up voices that are less prone to exploit those sectarian divides, but, you know, we're not going to eliminate that stuff overnight.

  2. Akram Al Deek:

    One of the reasons for which you ultimately became a teacher, however, is the way by which you were taught. You came to realise that teaching is a political act at the heart of which lies political change. You became a teacher to rectify things. Because you had a great responsibility towards the future. As a teenager, you attended an average boys’ public school in a suburban area of a small city in the northeast of Jordan. It was a school where English was not obligatory until the sixth grade. A school where you were taught to stand up for your superiors as they walked into class, and where any eye-contact was frowned upon. A school where you were inspected for your haircut, nails, and shoes but not your concerns. A school where it mattered more where you are from than who you are. A school where the science teacher taught geography, sports, and Islamic religion, too. A school where you were grabbed by the ears and pulled up, hit repeatedly on the knuckles and slapped on the face for not remembering the capital of Cambodia. And for that you never forgot the capital of Cambodia. A school where philosophy was marginalised by religion. And where you had to wait in queues to urinate because toilets were busy with concealed homosexual activities. A school where during winter you had to wear layers and layers of wool and cotton because there was no central heating, double-glazed windows, or even curtains. A school where the drawing studio was used as a canteen by teachers during lunch-time only. A school where there was no awareness of the disconnection between the teaching curriculum and societal needs. A school where the story always goes with Mr Ali in the office, while Mrs Ali is always in the kitchen. A school where most teachers finished classes 15 to 20 minutes earlier so that they could exploit parents and students in highly expensive private classes outside the school. A school where all music classes were spent teaching you how to play the national anthem. A school where it was always easier to deny and reject than debate and accept. A school where the quiet boy was always neglected. A school where you were always asked what to do, but never did anyone ever do what you asked: to listen. A school where your colleagues were scolded for being overtaken in class by a Palestinian student.

  3. Jonathan Zdziarski:

    The FBI would need to resign itself to the fact that such an exploit would only be viable for a few months, if released to other departments, it would be a temporary Vegas jackpot that would quickly get squandered on the case backlog.

  4. Hiya COO Kush Parikh:

    Phone scammers have shown resiliency over the years and constantly change their tactics to find new ways to exploit the public, they will likely bounce back from the disruption caused by the Covid-19 crisis.

  5. Archibald MacLeish:

    The American mood, perhaps even the American character, has changed. There are few manifestations any longer of the old American self-assurance which so irritated Dickens. Instead, there is a sense of frustration so perceptible that even our politicians have attempted to exploit it.

Images & Illustrations of exploit

  1. exploitexploitexploitexploitexploit

Popularity rank by frequency of use

exploit#10000#10264#100000

Translations for exploit

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    established or prearranged unalterably
    • A. defiant
    • B. ambidextrous
    • C. contagious
    • D. foreordained

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