What does evidently mean?

Definitions for evidently
ˈɛv ɪ dənt li, -ˌdɛnt-; for emphasis ˌɛv ɪˈdɛnt liev·i·dent·ly

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word evidently.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. obviously, evidently, manifestly, patently, apparently, plainly, plainadverb

    unmistakably (`plain' is often used informally for `plainly')

    "the answer is obviously wrong"; "she was in bed and evidently in great pain"; "he was manifestly too important to leave off the guest list"; "it is all patently nonsense"; "she has apparently been living here for some time"; "I thought he owned the property, but apparently not"; "You are plainly wrong"; "he is plain stubborn"

Wiktionary

  1. evidentlyadverb

    In such a way as to be clearly visible or manifest; distinctly, clearly.

  2. evidentlyadverb

    In a manner which makes the fact or conclusion evident; obviously, as may be clearly inferred.

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. Evidentlyadverb

    Apparently; certainly; undeniably.

    Etymology: from evident.

    Laying their eggs, they evidently prove
    The genial pow’r and full effects of love. Matthew Prior.

    The printing private letters is the worst sort of betraying conversation, as it has evidently the most extensive ill consequences. Alexander Pope.

Wikipedia

  1. evidently

    Evidence for a proposition is what supports this proposition. It is usually understood as an indication that the supported proposition is true. What role evidence plays and how it is conceived varies from field to field. In epistemology, evidence is what justifies beliefs or what makes it rational to hold a certain doxastic attitude. For example, a perceptual experience of a tree may act as evidence that justifies the belief that there is a tree. In this role, evidence is usually understood as a private mental state. Important topics in this field include the questions of what the nature of these mental states is, for example, whether they have to be propositional, and whether misleading mental states can still qualify as evidence. In phenomenology, evidence is understood in a similar sense. Here, however, it is limited to intuitive knowledge that provides immediate access to truth and is therefore indubitable. In this role, it is supposed to provide ultimate justifications for basic philosophical principles and thus turn philosophy into a rigorous science. However, it is highly controversial whether evidence can meet these requirements. Other fields, including the sciences and the law, tend to emphasize more the public nature of evidence (for example, scientists tend to focus on how the data used during statistical inference are generated). In philosophy of science, evidence is understood as that which confirms or disconfirms scientific hypotheses. Measurements of Mercury's "anomalous" orbit, for example, are seen as evidence that confirms Einstein's theory of general relativity. In order to play the role of neutral arbiter between competing theories, it is important that scientific evidence is public and uncontroversial, like observable physical objects or events, so that the proponents of the different theories can agree on what the evidence is. This is ensured by following the scientific method and tends to lead to an emerging scientific consensus through the gradual accumulation of evidence. Two issues for the scientific conception of evidence are the problem of underdetermination, i.e. that the available evidence may support competing theories equally well, and theory-ladenness, i.e. that what some scientists consider the evidence to be may already involve various theoretical assumptions not shared by other scientists. It is often held that there are two kinds of evidence: intellectual evidence or what is self-evident and empirical evidence or evidence accessible through the senses. In order for something to act as evidence for a hypothesis, it has to stand in the right relation to it. In philosophy, this is referred to as the "evidential relation" and there are competing theories about what this relation has to be like. Probabilistic approaches hold that something counts as evidence if it increases the probability of the supported hypothesis. According to hypothetico-deductivism, evidence consists in observational consequences of the hypothesis. The positive-instance approach states that an observation sentence is evidence for a universal hypothesis if the sentence describes a positive instance of this hypothesis. The evidential relation can occur in various degrees of strength. These degrees range from direct proof of the truth of a hypothesis to weak evidence that is merely consistent with the hypothesis but does not rule out other, competing hypotheses, as in circumstantial evidence. In law, rules of evidence govern the types of evidence that are admissible in a legal proceeding. Types of legal evidence include testimony, documentary evidence, and physical evidence. The parts of a legal case that are not in controversy are known, in general, as the "facts of the case." Beyond any facts that are undisputed, a judge or jury is usually tasked with being a trier of fact for the other issues of a case. Evidence and rules are used to decide questions of fact that are disputed, some of which may be determined by the legal burden of proof relevant to the case. Evidence in certain cases (e.g. capital crimes) must be more compelling than in other situations (e.g. minor civil disputes), which drastically affects the quality and quantity of evidence necessary to decide a case.

ChatGPT

  1. evidently

    Evidently is an adverb that means in a way that is clearly seen or understood; obviously. It connotes certainty and is often used to suggest something is clearly apparent from facts or circumstances, either based on evidence or through obvious deductions. It can also express an opinion or statement as apparently true or factual, but not necessarily based on definite knowledge or proof.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Evidentlyadverb

    in an evident manner; clearly; plainly

British National Corpus

  1. Adverbs Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'evidently' in Adverbs Frequency: #351

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of evidently in Chaldean Numerology is: 7

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of evidently in Pythagorean Numerology is: 8

Examples of evidently in a Sentence

  1. Carson Block:

    Everything about Superb Summit is empty, including its response, which evidently took eight weeks to write.

  2. Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto:

    Evidently, there's a whole process we have to go through that involves the judicial branch of our country, but the directive that the Attorney General's Office has been given is to work and speed up this work to make this extradition of this highly dangerous criminal happen as soon as possible.

  3. Joshua Wong:

    I'm shocked and appalled as the Hong Kong Government evidently colluded with Chinese authorities to put activists in greater danger, on matters clearly within its jurisdiction.

  4. Austin Powers International Man of Mystery:

    Dr. Evil You know, I have one simple request. And that is to have sharks with frickin' laser beams attached to their heads Now evidently my cycloptic colleague informs me that that cannot be done. Ah, what do I pay you people for, honestly Throw me a bone here

  5. Alcee Hastings:

    I love Texans, but I do not like their policy makers who are in the majority, the simple fact of the matter is, evidently, I touched a nerve deep in the heart of Texas. And I would ask them to tie a yellow rose around it and do like 'Frozen' and 'Let it go.'.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

evidently#10000#17985#100000

Translations for evidently

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"evidently." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 13 Apr. 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/evidently>.

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