What does evident mean?

Definitions for evident
ˈɛv ɪ dəntev·i·dent

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word evident.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. apparent, evident, manifest, patent, plain, unmistakableadjective

    clearly revealed to the mind or the senses or judgment

    "the effects of the drought are apparent to anyone who sees the parched fields"; "evident hostility"; "manifest disapproval"; "patent advantages"; "made his meaning plain"; "it is plain that he is no reactionary"; "in plain view"

  2. discernible, evident, observableadjective

    capable of being seen or noticed

    "a discernible change in attitude"; "a clearly evident erasure in the manuscript"; "an observable change in behavior"

Wiktionary

  1. evidentadjective

    Obviously true by simple observation.

    It was evident she was angry, after she slammed the door.

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. Evidentadjective

    Plain; apparent; notorious.

    Etymology: French.

    It is evident, in the general frame of nature, that things most manifest unto sense have proved obscure unto the understanding. Thomas Browne, Vulgar Errours, b. vi. c. 10.

    In this state they are incapable of making conquests upon their neighbours, which is evident to all that know their constitutions. William Temple.

    Children minded not what was said, when it was evident to them that no attention was sufficient. John Locke.

Wikipedia

  1. evident

    Evidence for a proposition is what supports this proposition. It is usually understood as an indication that the supported proposition is true. What role evidence plays and how it is conceived varies from field to field. In epistemology, evidence is what justifies beliefs or what makes it rational to hold a certain doxastic attitude. For example, a perceptual experience of a tree may act as evidence that justifies the belief that there is a tree. In this role, evidence is usually understood as a private mental state. Important topics in this field include the questions of what the nature of these mental states is, for example, whether they have to be propositional, and whether misleading mental states can still qualify as evidence. In phenomenology, evidence is understood in a similar sense. Here, however, it is limited to intuitive knowledge that provides immediate access to truth and is therefore indubitable. In this role, it is supposed to provide ultimate justifications for basic philosophical principles and thus turn philosophy into a rigorous science. However, it is highly controversial whether evidence can meet these requirements. Other fields, including the sciences and the law, tend to emphasize more the public nature of evidence (for example, scientists tend to focus on how the data used during statistical inference are generated). In philosophy of science, evidence is understood as that which confirms or disconfirms scientific hypotheses. Measurements of Mercury's "anomalous" orbit, for example, are seen as evidence that confirms Einstein's theory of general relativity. In order to play the role of neutral arbiter between competing theories, it is important that scientific evidence is public and uncontroversial, like observable physical objects or events, so that the proponents of the different theories can agree on what the evidence is. This is ensured by following the scientific method and tends to lead to an emerging scientific consensus through the gradual accumulation of evidence. Two issues for the scientific conception of evidence are the problem of underdetermination, i.e. that the available evidence may support competing theories equally well, and theory-ladenness, i.e. that what some scientists consider the evidence to be may already involve various theoretical assumptions not shared by other scientists. It is often held that there are two kinds of evidence: intellectual evidence or what is self-evident and empirical evidence or evidence accessible through the senses. In order for something to act as evidence for a hypothesis, it has to stand in the right relation to it. In philosophy, this is referred to as the "evidential relation" and there are competing theories about what this relation has to be like. Probabilistic approaches hold that something counts as evidence if it increases the probability of the supported hypothesis. According to hypothetico-deductivism, evidence consists in observational consequences of the hypothesis. The positive-instance approach states that an observation sentence is evidence for a universal hypothesis if the sentence describes a positive instance of this hypothesis. The evidential relation can occur in various degrees of strength. These degrees range from direct proof of the truth of a hypothesis to weak evidence that is merely consistent with the hypothesis but does not rule out other, competing hypotheses, as in circumstantial evidence. In law, rules of evidence govern the types of evidence that are admissible in a legal proceeding. Types of legal evidence include testimony, documentary evidence, and physical evidence. The parts of a legal case that are not in controversy are known, in general, as the "facts of the case." Beyond any facts that are undisputed, a judge or jury is usually tasked with being a trier of fact for the other issues of a case. Evidence and rules are used to decide questions of fact that are disputed, some of which may be determined by the legal burden of proof relevant to the case. Evidence in certain cases (e.g. capital crimes) must be more compelling than in other situations (e.g. minor civil disputes), which drastically affects the quality and quantity of evidence necessary to decide a case.

ChatGPT

  1. evident

    Evident is an adjective that refers to something that is clearly seen, understood or realized; something that is obvious or apparent. It can relate to both physical observations and abstract concepts.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Evidentadjective

    clear to the vision; especially, clear to the understanding, and satisfactory to the judgment; as, the figure or color of a body is evident to the senses; the guilt of an offender can not always be made evident

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Evident

    ev′i-dent, adj. that is visible or can be seen: clear to the mind: obvious.—n. Ev′idence, that which makes evident: means of proving an unknown or disputed fact: information in a law case, as 'to give evidence:' a witness.—v.t. to render evident: (obs.) to attest, prove.—adjs. Eviden′tial, Eviden′tiary, furnishing evidence: tending to prove.—advs. Eviden′tially; Ev′idently (N.T.), visibly.—In evidence, received by the court as competent evidence: plainly visible, conspicuous—a penny-a-liner's phrase adopted from the Fr. en evidence; Turn King's (Queen's) evidence (of an accomplice in a crime), to give evidence against his partners. [L. evidens, -entise, out, vidēre, to see.]

Entomology

  1. Evident

    easily seen or recognized.

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'evident' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #3599

  2. Adjectives Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'evident' in Adjectives Frequency: #492

How to pronounce evident?

How to say evident in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of evident in Chaldean Numerology is: 3

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of evident in Pythagorean Numerology is: 7

Examples of evident in a Sentence

  1. Photographer Camilo Ramirez:

    I originally went to the Gulf just to look without having any political agenda and without having any judgment, i didn't want my political bias to be evident when I was really trying to be open to the experience and what this place is about.

  2. Simon Mitchell:

    The doctor is supposed to note any evident issues that he notices -- but what is he going to notice in half an hour's medical? The rest of it relies on your medical history and you being honest.

  3. Sandy Orth:

    To me it’s important to have a president of the United States that’s of good character and it soon became evident after he became president that he was going to do things his way and it didn’t matter if he was rude to people, disrespectful to people, although there were many things he did as president that I thought were good things, in my mind it didn’t overcome his demeanor and his character.

  4. John Kerry:

    I think it's self-evident that if Iran is taking (action against ISIS) in some particular place, and it's confined to taking on (ISIS) and it has an impact, it's going to be a net effect that is positive, but it's not something we're coordinating.

  5. Thomas Jefferson:

    We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with inherent and inalienable rights; that among these, are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness; that to secure these rights, governments are instituted among men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed;

Popularity rank by frequency of use

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Translations for evident

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"evident." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 24 May 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/evident>.

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