What does eulogy mean?

Definitions for eulogy
ˈyu lə dʒieu·lo·gy

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word eulogy.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. eulogy, eulogiumnoun

    a formal expression of praise for someone who has died recently

  2. encomium, eulogy, panegyric, paean, peannoun

    a formal expression of praise

Wiktionary

  1. eulogynoun

    An oration to honor a deceased person, usually at a funeral.

  2. eulogynoun

    Speaking highly of someone; the act of praising or commending someone.

  3. Etymology: εὐλογία.

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. Eulogynoun

    Praise; encomium; panegyrick.

    Etymology: ἐυ and λόγος.

    Many brave young minds have oftentimes, through hearing the praises and famous eulogies of worthy men, been stirred up to affect the like commendations. Edmund Spenser, on Ireland.

Wikipedia

  1. Eulogy

    A eulogy (from εὐλογία, eulogia, Classical Greek, eu for "well" or "true", logia for "words" or "text", together for "praise") is a speech or writing in praise of a person or persons, especially one who recently died or retired, or as a term of endearment.Eulogies may be given as part of funeral services. In the US, they take place in a funeral home during or after a wake; in the UK, they are said during the service, typically at a crematorium or place of worship, before the wake. In the US, some denominations either discourage or do not permit eulogies at services to maintain respect for traditions. Eulogies can also praise people who are still alive. This normally takes place on special occasions like birthdays, office parties, retirement celebrations, etc. Eulogies should not be confused with elegies, which are poems written in tribute to the dead; nor with obituaries, which are published biographies recounting the lives of those who have recently died; nor with obsequies, which refer generally to the rituals surrounding funerals. Roman Catholic priests are prohibited by the rubrics of the Mass from presenting a eulogy for the deceased in place of a homily during a funeral Mass.The modern use of the word eulogy was first documented in the 16th century and came from the Medieval Latin term eulogium. Eulogium at that time has since turned into the shorter eulogy of today.Eulogies are usually delivered by a family member or a close family friend in the case of a dead person. For a living eulogy given in such cases as a retirement, a senior colleague could perhaps deliver it. On occasions, eulogies are given to those who are severely ill or elderly in order to express words of love and gratitude before they die. Eulogies are not limited to merely people, however; places or things can also be given eulogies (which anyone can deliver), but these are less common than those delivered to people, whether living or deceased. In some cases, a self-eulogy is written before the subject dies, with the aim of having a friend or family member read out their words to the funeral mass.

ChatGPT

  1. eulogy

    A eulogy is a speech or written tribute, often high in praise and given in honor of a person who has recently passed away, typically delivered during a funeral or memorial service. It can also involve recounting the deceased's life, character, and accomplishments.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Eulogynoun

    a speech or writing in commendation of the character or services of a person; as, a fitting eulogy to worth

Wikidata

  1. Eulogy

    A eulogy is a speech or writing in praise of a person or thing, especially one recently dead or retired. Eulogies may be given as part of funeral services. They take place in a funeral home during or after a wake. However, some denominations either discourage or do not permit eulogies at services to maintain respect for traditions. Eulogies can also praise people who are still alive. This normally takes place on special occasions like birthdays etc. Eulogies should not be confused with elegies, which are poems written in tribute to the dead; nor with obituaries, which are published biographies recounting the lives of those who have recently died; nor with obsequies, which refer generally to the rituals surrounding funerals. Catholic priests are prohibited by the rubrics of the Mass from presenting a eulogy for the deceased in place of a homily during a funeral Mass. Eulogies are usually delivered by a family member or a close family friend in the case of a dead person. For a living eulogy given in such cases as a retirement, a senior colleague could perhaps deliver it. On occasions, eulogies are given to those who are severely ill or elderly in order to express words of love and gratitude before they pass away.

Suggested Resources

  1. Eulogy

    Eulogy vs. Elegy -- In this Grammar.com article you will learn the differences between the words Eulogy and Elegy.

How to pronounce eulogy?

How to say eulogy in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of eulogy in Chaldean Numerology is: 7

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of eulogy in Pythagorean Numerology is: 4

Examples of eulogy in a Sentence

  1. Dagen McDowell:

    And as Greg pointed out, he was a Democrat – but Biden once bragged about Wallace paying him a compliment, joe Biden gave a eulogy a little more than a decade ago for a former exalted cyclops of the Klan – Robert Byrd.

  2. Joe Russo:

    And he does something similar in the next sequence when he gives his own eulogy.

  3. Joe Biden:

    He asked me to do his eulogy – excuse me, I shouldn’t say that, i spent time with Jimmy Carter, and it’s finally caught up with him. But they found a way to keep him going for a lot longer than they anticipated, because they found a breakthrough.

  4. Al Sharpton:

    You know, two weeks after I did the eulogy at George Floyd’s funeral I did the eulogy for a 1-year-old kid in Brooklyn killed by a stray bullet in a gang fight, so it is not true that those of us that want police reform do not also at the same time want to deal with crime. And I think that the progressive candidates need to be more out on that.

  5. Chris Coons:

    Johnny had a difficult day. He delivered the eulogy today for his best friend.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

eulogy#10000#48701#100000

Translations for eulogy

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"eulogy." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 13 Jul 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/eulogy>.

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