What does endogen mean?

Definitions for endogen
en·do·gen

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word endogen.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. monocot, monocotyledon, liliopsid, endogennoun

    a monocotyledonous flowering plant; the stem grows by deposits on its inside

Wikipedia

  1. endogen

    Monocotyledons (), commonly referred to as monocots, (Lilianae sensu Chase & Reveal) are grass and grass-like flowering plants (angiosperms), the seeds of which typically contain only one embryonic leaf, or cotyledon. They constitute one of the major groups into which the flowering plants have traditionally been divided; the rest of the flowering plants have two cotyledons and are classified as dicotyledons, or dicots. Monocotyledons have almost always been recognized as a group, but with various taxonomic ranks and under several different names. The APG III system of 2009 recognises a clade called "monocots" but does not assign it to a taxonomic rank. The monocotyledons include about 60,000 species, about a quarter of all angiosperms. The largest family in this group (and in the flowering plants as a whole) by number of species are the orchids (family Orchidaceae), with more than 20,000 species. About 12,000 species belong to the true grasses (Poaceae), which are economically the most important family of monocotyledons. Often mistaken for grasses, sedges are also monocots. In agriculture the majority of the biomass produced comes from monocotyledons. These include not only major grains (rice, wheat, maize, etc.), but also forage grasses, sugar cane, and the bamboos. Other economically important monocotyledon crops include various palms (Arecaceae), bananas and plantains (Musaceae), gingers and their relatives, turmeric and cardamom (Zingiberaceae), asparagus (Asparagaceae), pineapple (Bromeliaceae), sedges (Cyperaceae) and rushes (Juncaceae), vanilla (Orchidaceae), and leeks, onion and garlic (Amaryllidaceae). Many houseplants are monocotyledon epiphytes. Most of the horticultural bulbs, plants cultivated for their blooms, such as lilies, daffodils, irises, amaryllis, cannas, bluebells and tulips, are monocotyledons.

ChatGPT

  1. endogen

    Endogen is a term primarily used in biology and economics. In biology, an endogen describes an organism that grows or develops from within; for example, a tree that grows new branches from its inner layers. In economics and social sciences, an endogen refers to variables or elements that are influenced within a model or system. They are determined by the functional relationships within the system. For instance, wage and output levels within a certain economic model are seen as endogenous because they are influenced by factors inside the model, such as employment rates.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Endogennoun

    a plant which increases in size by internal growth and elongation at the summit, having the wood in the form of bundles or threads, irregularly distributed throughout the whole diameter, not forming annual layers, and with no distinct pith. The leaves of the endogens have, usually, parallel veins, their flowers are mostly in three, or some multiple of three, parts, and their embryos have but a single cotyledon, with the first leaves alternate. The endogens constitute one of the great primary classes of plants, and included all palms, true lilies, grasses, rushes, orchids, the banana, pineapple, etc. See Exogen

  2. Etymology: [Endo- + -gen: cf. F. endogne.]

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Endogen

    en′do-jen, n. a plant that grows from within, or by additions to the inside of the stem, as the palm, grasses, &c.—adj. Endog′enous, increasing by internal growth. [Gr. endon, within, and genēs, born.]

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of endogen in Chaldean Numerology is: 7

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of endogen in Pythagorean Numerology is: 1


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"endogen." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 16 Jun 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/endogen>.

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