What does edda mean?

Definitions for edda
ˈɛd əed·da

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word edda.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. taro, taro root, cocoyam, dasheen, eddanoun

    tropical starchy tuberous root

  2. Eddanoun

    either of two distinct works in Old Icelandic dating from the late 13th century and consisting of 34 mythological and heroic ballads composed between 800 and 1200; the primary source for Scandinavian mythology

Wiktionary

  1. Eddanoun

    A collection of Old Norse poems and tales from two medieval manuscripts found in Iceland.

Wikipedia

  1. Edda

    "Edda" (; Old Norse Edda, plural Eddur) is an Old Norse term that has been attributed by modern scholars to the collective of two Medieval Icelandic literary works: what is now known as the Prose Edda and an older collection of poems without an original title now known as the Poetic Edda. The term historically referred only to the Prose Edda, but this has fallen out of use because of the confusion with the other work. Both works were written down in Iceland during the 13th century in Icelandic, although they contain material from earlier traditional sources, reaching into the Viking Age. The books are the main sources of medieval skaldic tradition in Iceland and Norse mythology.

ChatGPT

  1. edda

    Edda is a term used to refer to two medieval literature collections of Old Norse texts from Iceland, the Poetic Edda and the Prose Edda. These texts include mythical and heroic stories from Norse and Germanic history, including mythology of the Viking culture. They have been key resources for the study of Norse mythology and poetry.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Eddanoun

    the religious or mythological book of the old Scandinavian tribes of German origin, containing two collections of Sagas (legends, myths) of the old northern gods and heroes

  2. Etymology: [Icel., lit. great-grandmother (i. e., of Scandinavian poetry), so called by Bishop Brynjlf Sveinsson, who brought it again to light in 1643.]

Wikidata

  1. Edda

    The term Edda applies to the Old Norse Poetic Edda and Prose Edda, both of which were written down in Iceland during the 13th century in Icelandic, although they contain material from earlier traditional sources, reaching into the Viking Age. The books are the main sources of medieval skaldic tradition in Iceland and Norse mythology.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Edda

    ed′a, n. the name of two Scandinavian books—the 'Elder' Edda, a collection of ancient mythological and heroic songs (9th-11th century); and the 'Younger' or prose Edda, by Snorri Sturluson (c. 1230), mythological stories, poetics, and prosody. [Ice., 'great-grandmother.']

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Edda

    the name given to two collections of legends illustrative of the Scandinavian mythology: the Elder, or Poetic, Edda, collected in the 11th century by Sæmund Sigfusson, an early Christian priest, "with perhaps a lingering fondness for paganism," and the Younger, or Prose, Edda, collected in the next century by Snorri Sturleson, an Icelandic gentleman (1178-1241), "educated by Sæmund's grandson, the latter a work constructed with great ingenuity and native talent, what one might call unconscious art, altogether a perspicuous, clear work, pleasant reading still."

Suggested Resources

  1. EDDA

    What does EDDA stand for? -- Explore the various meanings for the EDDA acronym on the Abbreviations.com website.

Matched Categories

Anagrams for edda »

  1. adde

  2. Dade

  3. dead

How to pronounce edda?

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of edda in Chaldean Numerology is: 5

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of edda in Pythagorean Numerology is: 5

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Translations for edda

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"edda." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 12 Jul 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/edda>.

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