What does drama mean?

Definitions for drama
ˈdrɑ mə, ˈdræm ədra·ma

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word drama.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. play, drama, dramatic playnoun

    a dramatic work intended for performance by actors on a stage

    "he wrote several plays but only one was produced on Broadway"

  2. drama, dramatic eventnoun

    an episode that is turbulent or highly emotional

  3. dramanoun

    the literary genre of works intended for the theater

  4. dramanoun

    the quality of being arresting or highly emotional

Wiktionary

  1. dramanoun

    A composition, normally in prose, telling a story and intended to be represented by actors impersonating the characters and speaking the dialogue

  2. dramanoun

    Such a work for television, radio or the cinema (usually one that is not a comedy)

  3. dramanoun

    Theatrical plays in general

  4. dramanoun

    A dramatic situation in real life

  5. dramanoun

    Rumor, lying or exaggerated reaction to life events; melodrama; an angry dispute or scene; intrigue or spiteful interpersonal maneuvering.

  6. Dramanoun

    A town in Greece.

  7. Etymology: From δρᾶμα, from δράω

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. DRAMAnoun

    A poem accommodated to action; a poem in which the action is not related, but represented; and in which therefore such rules are to be observed as make the representation probable.

    Etymology: δϱαμα.

    Many rules of imitating nature Aristotle drew from , which he fitted to the drama; furnishing himself also with observations from the theatre, when it flourished under Eschylus, Euripides, and Sophocles. John Dryden, Æn. Dedicat.

Wikipedia

  1. Drama

    Drama! is the first single released in September 1989 by Erasure from their fourth studio album Wild!. It was issued by Mute Records in the UK and Sire Records in the United States. Written by Vince Clarke and Andy Bell, the synthpop song begins with a low-key keyboard line and a subdued vocal from Bell. As the song progresses, the instrumentation and vocals become more hectic, ultimately ending as a full-blown dance track. "Drama!" contains a "Guilty!" exclamation throughout, provided by Scottish band The Jesus and Mary Chain, who were recording in the studio next door. Released prior to Wild!, "Drama!" continued Erasure's streak of hits on the UK Singles Chart, peaking at number four. The single also fared well in Denmark, where it reached number 3 and in Germany, where it hit number 12. "Drama!" did not continue Erasure's chart success in the United States, where it failed to enter the Billboard Hot 100. It did, however, climb to number 10 on the Billboard Hot Dance Music/Club Play chart.

ChatGPT

  1. drama

    Drama is a genre of literature, film, television, or online media that involves characters and events intended to evoke strong emotions and reactions from the audience. It often deals with personal or emotional themes and conflicts, and can include elements of tragedy, comedy, and other genres. This term can also refer to the art of creating, writing, or performing dramatic works. In a broader context, drama can refer to any situation or event that is intense, emotional, or unexpected.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Dramanoun

    a composition, in prose or poetry, accommodated to action, and intended to exhibit a picture of human life, or to depict a series of grave or humorous actions of more than ordinary interest, tending toward some striking result. It is commonly designed to be spoken and represented by actors on the stage

  2. Dramanoun

    a series of real events invested with a dramatic unity and interest

  3. Dramanoun

    dramatic composition and the literature pertaining to or illustrating it; dramatic literature

  4. Etymology: [L. drama, Gr. dra^ma, fr. dra^n to do, act; cf. Lith. daryti.]

Wikidata

  1. Drama

    Drama is the specific mode of fiction represented in performance. The term comes from a Greek word meaning "action", which is derived from the verb meaning "to do" or "to act". The enactment of drama in theatre, performed by actors on a stage before an audience, presupposes collaborative modes of production and a collective form of reception. The structure of dramatic texts, unlike other forms of literature, is directly influenced by this collaborative production and collective reception. The early modern tragedy Hamlet by Shakespeare and the classical Athenian tragedy Oedipus the King by Sophocles are among the masterpieces of the art of drama. A modern example is Long Day's Journey into Night by Eugene O’Neill. The two masks associated with drama represent the traditional generic division between comedy and tragedy. They are symbols of the ancient Greek Muses, Thalia and Melpomene. Thalia was the Muse of comedy, while Melpomene was the Muse of tragedy. Considered as a genre of poetry in general, the dramatic mode has been contrasted with the epic and the lyrical modes ever since Aristotle's Poetics —the earliest work of dramatic theory.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Drama

    dram′a, n. a story of human life and action represented by actors imitating the language, dress, &c. of the original characters: a composition intended to be represented on the stage: dramatic literature: theatrical entertainment: a series of deeply interesting events.—adjs. Dramatic, -al, belonging to the drama: appropriate to or in the form of a drama: with the force and vividness of the drama.—adv. Dramat′ically.—n. Dramat′icism.—adj. Dram′atīsable.—n. Dramatisā′tion, the act of dramatising: the dramatised version of a novel or story.—v.i. Dram′atīse, to compose in, or turn into, the form of a drama or play.—n. Dram′atist, a writer of plays.—Dram′atis persō′næ (-ē), the characters of a drama or play. [L.,—Gr. drama, dramatosdraein, to do.]

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Drama

    A composition in prose or verse presenting in dialogue or pantomime a story involving various characters, usually intended to be acted on a stage and to be regarded as a form of entertainment. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)

Suggested Resources

  1. drama

    Song lyrics by drama -- Explore a large variety of song lyrics performed by drama on the Lyrics.com website.

Matched Categories

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'drama' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #2827

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'drama' in Written Corpus Frequency: #4544

  3. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'drama' in Nouns Frequency: #1174

How to pronounce drama?

How to say drama in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of drama in Chaldean Numerology is: 3

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of drama in Pythagorean Numerology is: 1

Examples of drama in a Sentence

  1. Trey Gowdy:

    The drama does not help anyone, so if you're going to produce it, produce it -- if you're not going to produce it let us know, that's helpful information, too. And then( Oversight Committee Speaker Paul Ryan) has to decide a number of things. But when you push the issue, you're not getting the documents, you're going to court.

  2. Daniel Hinerfeld:

    We really need to see more film and TV that really is dealing with all of the incredibly complicated and dramatic and potentially comedic aspects of climate change, which is this huge drama.

  3. Jockey Club:

    Horseracing is the second biggest spectator sport in Britain and we want to ensure a new generation of fans are constantly discovering the drama and excitement of its stories.

  4. Michael Zeldin:

    It will be a spectacle. No question about that, but after the midday TV drama is over, we'll see if there is anything that amounts to something from a legal perspective.

  5. Emmanuel Macron:

    But we will send him another one. It is not a drama.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

drama#1#3570#10000

Translations for drama

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

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"drama." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 1 Mar. 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/drama>.

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