What does domain mean?

Definitions for domain
doʊˈmeɪndo·main

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word domain.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. sphere, domain, area, orbit, field, arenanoun

    a particular environment or walk of life

    "his social sphere is limited"; "it was a closed area of employment"; "he's out of my orbit"

  2. domain, demesne, landnoun

    territory over which rule or control is exercised

    "his domain extended into Europe"; "he made it the law of the land"

  3. domain, domain of a functionnoun

    (mathematics) the set of values of the independent variable for which a function is defined

  4. world, domainnoun

    people in general; especially a distinctive group of people with some shared interest

    "the Western world"

  5. knowledge domain, knowledge base, domainnoun

    the content of a particular field of knowledge

GCIDE

  1. Domainnoun

    (Math.) a connected set of points, also called a region.

    Etymology: [F. domaine, OF. demaine, L. dominium, property, right of ownership, fr. dominus master, owner. See Dame, and cf Demesne, Dungeon.]

  2. Domainnoun

    (Physics) a region within a ferromagnetic material, composed of a number of atoms whose magnetic poles are pointed in the same direction, and which may move together in a coordinated manner when disturbed, as by heating. The direction of polarity of adjacent domains may be different, but may be aligned by a strong external magnetic field.

    Etymology: [F. domaine, OF. demaine, L. dominium, property, right of ownership, fr. dominus master, owner. See Dame, and cf Demesne, Dungeon.]

  3. Domainnoun

    (Computers) an address within the internet computer network, which may be a single computer, a network of computers, or one of a number of accounts on a multiuser computer. The domain specifies the location (host computer) to which communications on the internet are directed. Each domain has a corresponding 32-bit number usually represented by four numbers separated by periods, as 128.32.282.56. Each domain may also have an alphabetical name, usually composed of a name plus an extension separated by a period, as worldsoul.org; the alphabetical name is referred to as a domain name.

    Etymology: [F. domaine, OF. demaine, L. dominium, property, right of ownership, fr. dominus master, owner. See Dame, and cf Demesne, Dungeon.]

  4. Domainnoun

    (Immunology) the three-dimensional structure within an immunoglobulin which is formed by one of the homology regions of a heavy or light chain. Dict. Sci. Tech.

    Etymology: [F. domaine, OF. demaine, L. dominium, property, right of ownership, fr. dominus master, owner. See Dame, and cf Demesne, Dungeon.]

Wiktionary

  1. domainnoun

    A geographic area owned or controlled by a single person or organization.

    The king ruled his domain harshly.

    Etymology: From demeine, demain, demeine, demaine, demeigne, domaine, ( domaine), from dominium, from dominus. See dame, and confer demain, danger, dungeon.

  2. domainnoun

    A sphere of influence.

    Dealing with complaints isn't really my domain: get in touch with customer services.

    Etymology: From demeine, demain, demeine, demaine, demeigne, domaine, ( domaine), from dominium, from dominus. See dame, and confer demain, danger, dungeon.

  3. domainnoun

    A group of related items, topics, or subjects.

    Etymology: From demeine, demain, demeine, demaine, demeigne, domaine, ( domaine), from dominium, from dominus. See dame, and confer demain, danger, dungeon.

  4. domainnoun

    The set of all possible mathematical entities (points) where a given function is defined.

    Etymology: From demeine, demain, demeine, demaine, demeigne, domaine, ( domaine), from dominium, from dominus. See dame, and confer demain, danger, dungeon.

  5. domainnoun

    An open and connected set in some topology. For example, the interval (0,1) as a subset of the real numbers.

    Etymology: From demeine, demain, demeine, demaine, demeigne, domaine, ( domaine), from dominium, from dominus. See dame, and confer demain, danger, dungeon.

  6. domainnoun

    Any DNS domain name, particularly one which has been delegated and has become representative of the delegated domain name and its subdomains

    Etymology: From demeine, demain, demeine, demaine, demeigne, domaine, ( domaine), from dominium, from dominus. See dame, and confer demain, danger, dungeon.

  7. domainnoun

    A collection of DNS or DNS-like domain names consisting of a delegated domain name and all its subdomains

    Etymology: From demeine, demain, demeine, demaine, demeigne, domaine, ( domaine), from dominium, from dominus. See dame, and confer demain, danger, dungeon.

  8. domainnoun

    A collection of information having to do with a domain, the computers named in the domain, and the network on which the computers named in the domain reside

    Etymology: From demeine, demain, demeine, demaine, demeigne, domaine, ( domaine), from dominium, from dominus. See dame, and confer demain, danger, dungeon.

  9. domainnoun

    The collection of computers identified by a domain's domain names

    Etymology: From demeine, demain, demeine, demaine, demeigne, domaine, ( domaine), from dominium, from dominus. See dame, and confer demain, danger, dungeon.

  10. domainnoun

    A small magnetized area of a bubble memory storing one bit, a bubble.

    Etymology: From demeine, demain, demeine, demaine, demeigne, domaine, ( domaine), from dominium, from dominus. See dame, and confer demain, danger, dungeon.

  11. domainnoun

    In the three-domain system, the highest rank in the classification of organisms, above kingdom; in other taxonomic systems, a similarly high rank

    Etymology: From demeine, demain, demeine, demaine, demeigne, domaine, ( domaine), from dominium, from dominus. See dame, and confer demain, danger, dungeon.

  12. domainnoun

    In the three-domain system, one of three taxa at that rank: Bacteria, Archaea, or Eukaryota.

    Etymology: From demeine, demain, demeine, demaine, demeigne, domaine, ( domaine), from dominium, from dominus. See dame, and confer demain, danger, dungeon.

  13. domainnoun

    A folded section of a protein molecule that has a discrete function

    Etymology: From demeine, demain, demeine, demaine, demeigne, domaine, ( domaine), from dominium, from dominus. See dame, and confer demain, danger, dungeon.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Domainnoun

    dominion; empire; authority

    Etymology: [F. domaine, OF. demaine, L. dominium, property, right of ownership, fr. dominus master, owner. See Dame, and cf Demesne, Dungeon.]

  2. Domainnoun

    the territory over which dominion or authority is exerted; the possessions of a sovereign or commonwealth, or the like. Also used figuratively

    Etymology: [F. domaine, OF. demaine, L. dominium, property, right of ownership, fr. dominus master, owner. See Dame, and cf Demesne, Dungeon.]

  3. Domainnoun

    landed property; estate; especially, the land about the mansion house of a lord, and in his immediate occupancy; demesne

    Etymology: [F. domaine, OF. demaine, L. dominium, property, right of ownership, fr. dominus master, owner. See Dame, and cf Demesne, Dungeon.]

  4. Domainnoun

    ownership of land; an estate or patrimony which one has in his own right; absolute proprietorship; paramount or sovereign ownership

    Etymology: [F. domaine, OF. demaine, L. dominium, property, right of ownership, fr. dominus master, owner. See Dame, and cf Demesne, Dungeon.]

Freebase

  1. Domain

    In biological taxonomy, a domain is the highest taxonomic rank of organisms in the Woese taxonomic system, higher than a kingdom. According to the three-domain system of Carl Woese, introduced in 1990, the Tree of Life consists of three domains: Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya. The arrangement of taxa reflects the fundamental differences in the genomes.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Domain

    do-mān′, n. what one is master of or has dominion over: an estate: territory: ownership of land: the scope or range of any subject or sphere of knowledge.—adjs. Domain′al, Domā′nial. [Fr.,—L. dominium, dominus, a master.]

Editors Contribution

  1. domain

    A defined and specific location on an internet website, webpage, server or computer network.

    The website had to purchase a doman name first.

    Submitted by MaryC on March 17, 2020  

Suggested Resources

  1. domain

    Song lyrics by domain -- Explore a large variety of song lyrics performed by domain on the Lyrics.com website.

British National Corpus

  1. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'domain' in Nouns Frequency: #1727

Anagrams for domain »

  1. domina

  2. daimon

How to pronounce domain?

How to say domain in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of domain in Chaldean Numerology is: 4

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of domain in Pythagorean Numerology is: 2

Examples of domain in a Sentence

  1. Anuj Somany:

    Heated debate, lengthy discussion and blame game between two groups by only raising name in the public domain, but not taking any punitive action against the same erring person are just a part of the drama whose script was prepared jointly to misguide onlookers by them.

  2. Michel Mayor:

    In some sense there is enough money, and in another (...) it is a very competitive domain.

  3. Ron McClain:

    We understand and are sensitive to the issues surrounding the potential use of eminent domain, which is rarely used.

  4. Larry Strickling:

    Free expression exists and flourishes online not because of perceived U.S. government oversight over the [domain name system], or because of any asserted special relationship that the United States has with ICANN, it exists and is protected when stakeholders work together to make decisions.

  5. State Hillary Clinton:

    I trust the American people to make their decisions about political and public matters and I feel like I've taken unprecedented steps for these emails to be in the public domain.

Images & Illustrations of domain

  1. domaindomaindomaindomaindomain

Popularity rank by frequency of use

domain#1#910#10000

Translations for domain

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