What does dispatch mean?

Definitions for dispatch
dɪˈspætʃdis·patch

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word dispatch.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. dispatch, despatch, communique(noun)

    an official report (usually sent in haste)

  2. dispatch, despatch, shipment(noun)

    the act of sending off something

  3. dispatch, despatch, expedition, expeditiousness(noun)

    the property of being prompt and efficient

    "it was done with dispatch"

  4. dispatch, despatch(verb)

    killing a person or animal

  5. dispatch, despatch, send off(verb)

    send away towards a designated goal

  6. dispatch, discharge, complete(verb)

    complete or carry out

    "discharge one's duties"

  7. murder, slay, hit, dispatch, bump off, off, polish off, remove(verb)

    kill intentionally and with premeditation

    "The mafia boss ordered his enemies murdered"

  8. dispatch(verb)

    dispose of rapidly and without delay and efficiently

    "He dispatched the task he was assigned"

  9. dispatch(verb)

    kill without delay

    "the traitor was dispatched by the conspirators"

Wiktionary

  1. dispatch(Noun)

    A message sent quickly, as a shipment, a prompt settlement of a business, or an important official message sent by a diplomat, or military officer.

    Etymology: The etymology of the word is uncertain. It is connected to the French dépêcher and dépêche which are in meaning equivalents to this word. The French words are made up of the prefix dés- (Lat. dis-) and the root of empêcher (Lat. impedicare, composed from prefix in- and pedica) translated as 'to refrain', 'to stop'. The French word came into English as "depeach", which was in use from the 15th century until "despatch" was introduced. This word is direct from the Italian dispacciare, or Spanish despachar, which must be derived from the Lat. root appearing in pactus (the perfect passive infinitive of the verb pangere) meaning fixed, fastened.

  2. dispatch(Noun)

    The act of getting rid of something quickly

    Etymology: The etymology of the word is uncertain. It is connected to the French dépêcher and dépêche which are in meaning equivalents to this word. The French words are made up of the prefix dés- (Lat. dis-) and the root of empêcher (Lat. impedicare, composed from prefix in- and pedica) translated as 'to refrain', 'to stop'. The French word came into English as "depeach", which was in use from the 15th century until "despatch" was introduced. This word is direct from the Italian dispacciare, or Spanish despachar, which must be derived from the Lat. root appearing in pactus (the perfect passive infinitive of the verb pangere) meaning fixed, fastened.

  3. dispatch(Noun)

    A mission by an emergency response service, typically attend to an emergency in the field.

    Etymology: The etymology of the word is uncertain. It is connected to the French dépêcher and dépêche which are in meaning equivalents to this word. The French words are made up of the prefix dés- (Lat. dis-) and the root of empêcher (Lat. impedicare, composed from prefix in- and pedica) translated as 'to refrain', 'to stop'. The French word came into English as "depeach", which was in use from the 15th century until "despatch" was introduced. This word is direct from the Italian dispacciare, or Spanish despachar, which must be derived from the Lat. root appearing in pactus (the perfect passive infinitive of the verb pangere) meaning fixed, fastened.

  4. dispatch(Noun)

    A dismissal.

    Etymology: The etymology of the word is uncertain. It is connected to the French dépêcher and dépêche which are in meaning equivalents to this word. The French words are made up of the prefix dés- (Lat. dis-) and the root of empêcher (Lat. impedicare, composed from prefix in- and pedica) translated as 'to refrain', 'to stop'. The French word came into English as "depeach", which was in use from the 15th century until "despatch" was introduced. This word is direct from the Italian dispacciare, or Spanish despachar, which must be derived from the Lat. root appearing in pactus (the perfect passive infinitive of the verb pangere) meaning fixed, fastened.

  5. dispatch(Verb)

    To send a shipment with promptness.

    Etymology: The etymology of the word is uncertain. It is connected to the French dépêcher and dépêche which are in meaning equivalents to this word. The French words are made up of the prefix dés- (Lat. dis-) and the root of empêcher (Lat. impedicare, composed from prefix in- and pedica) translated as 'to refrain', 'to stop'. The French word came into English as "depeach", which was in use from the 15th century until "despatch" was introduced. This word is direct from the Italian dispacciare, or Spanish despachar, which must be derived from the Lat. root appearing in pactus (the perfect passive infinitive of the verb pangere) meaning fixed, fastened.

  6. dispatch(Verb)

    To send an important official message sent by a diplomat or military officer with promptness

    Etymology: The etymology of the word is uncertain. It is connected to the French dépêcher and dépêche which are in meaning equivalents to this word. The French words are made up of the prefix dés- (Lat. dis-) and the root of empêcher (Lat. impedicare, composed from prefix in- and pedica) translated as 'to refrain', 'to stop'. The French word came into English as "depeach", which was in use from the 15th century until "despatch" was introduced. This word is direct from the Italian dispacciare, or Spanish despachar, which must be derived from the Lat. root appearing in pactus (the perfect passive infinitive of the verb pangere) meaning fixed, fastened.

  7. dispatch(Verb)

    To hurry

    Etymology: The etymology of the word is uncertain. It is connected to the French dépêcher and dépêche which are in meaning equivalents to this word. The French words are made up of the prefix dés- (Lat. dis-) and the root of empêcher (Lat. impedicare, composed from prefix in- and pedica) translated as 'to refrain', 'to stop'. The French word came into English as "depeach", which was in use from the 15th century until "despatch" was introduced. This word is direct from the Italian dispacciare, or Spanish despachar, which must be derived from the Lat. root appearing in pactus (the perfect passive infinitive of the verb pangere) meaning fixed, fastened.

  8. dispatch(Verb)

    To deprive.

    Etymology: The etymology of the word is uncertain. It is connected to the French dépêcher and dépêche which are in meaning equivalents to this word. The French words are made up of the prefix dés- (Lat. dis-) and the root of empêcher (Lat. impedicare, composed from prefix in- and pedica) translated as 'to refrain', 'to stop'. The French word came into English as "depeach", which was in use from the 15th century until "despatch" was introduced. This word is direct from the Italian dispacciare, or Spanish despachar, which must be derived from the Lat. root appearing in pactus (the perfect passive infinitive of the verb pangere) meaning fixed, fastened.

  9. dispatch(Verb)

    To destroy quickly and efficiently

    Etymology: The etymology of the word is uncertain. It is connected to the French dépêcher and dépêche which are in meaning equivalents to this word. The French words are made up of the prefix dés- (Lat. dis-) and the root of empêcher (Lat. impedicare, composed from prefix in- and pedica) translated as 'to refrain', 'to stop'. The French word came into English as "depeach", which was in use from the 15th century until "despatch" was introduced. This word is direct from the Italian dispacciare, or Spanish despachar, which must be derived from the Lat. root appearing in pactus (the perfect passive infinitive of the verb pangere) meaning fixed, fastened.

  10. dispatch(Verb)

    To pass on for further processing, especially via a dispatch table (computing, often with to)

    Etymology: The etymology of the word is uncertain. It is connected to the French dépêcher and dépêche which are in meaning equivalents to this word. The French words are made up of the prefix dés- (Lat. dis-) and the root of empêcher (Lat. impedicare, composed from prefix in- and pedica) translated as 'to refrain', 'to stop'. The French word came into English as "depeach", which was in use from the 15th century until "despatch" was introduced. This word is direct from the Italian dispacciare, or Spanish despachar, which must be derived from the Lat. root appearing in pactus (the perfect passive infinitive of the verb pangere) meaning fixed, fastened.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Dispatch(verb)

    to dispose of speedily, as business; to execute quickly; to make a speedy end of; to finish; to perform

  2. Dispatch(verb)

    to rid; to free

  3. Dispatch(verb)

    to get rid of by sending off; to send away hastily

  4. Dispatch(verb)

    to send off or away; -- particularly applied to sending off messengers, messages, letters, etc., on special business, and implying haste

  5. Dispatch(verb)

    to send out of the world; to put to death

  6. Dispatch(verb)

    to make haste; to conclude an affair; to finish a matter of business

  7. Dispatch(verb)

    the act of sending a message or messenger in haste or on important business

  8. Dispatch(verb)

    any sending away; dismissal; riddance

  9. Dispatch(verb)

    the finishing up of a business; speedy performance, as of business; prompt execution; diligence; haste

  10. Dispatch(verb)

    a message dispatched or sent with speed; especially, an important official letter sent from one public officer to another; -- often used in the plural; as, a messenger has arrived with dispatches for the American minister; naval or military dispatches

  11. Dispatch(verb)

    a message transmitted by telegraph

Freebase

  1. Dispatch

    Dispatch is an American indie/roots band. The band consists of Brad Corrigan, Pete Francis Heimbold, and Chad Urmston. The band, which is based in the Boston area, was originally active from 1996 until 2002. The members then announced a hiatus, which would ultimately last for almost a decade; during this period, the band came together for reunion concerts in Boston, New York City and Washington, D.C.. The hiatus ended in the beginning of 2011, when the band announced a national tour. In May of the same year, Dispatch released an EP containing six new songs, their first all-new release since 2000. The band released both their first studio album in over a decade, Circles Around the Sun, and an iTunes session in 2012 and toured North America that summer in support of the album. On April 22, 2013, Dispatch announced a double-disc live album called "Ain't No Trip to Cleveland Vol. 1" and slated for release on June 4, 2013.

CrunchBase

  1. Dispatch

    Dispatches are intelligent group email addresses for your projects. No more noise. No more hassle.The Simplicity of Email + The Power of a Project Management System.Dispatch began at the TechCrunch Disrupt NY Hackathon 2011. It was created by a team of three, including 17 year old Alex Godin, to solve organization problems with file sharing by consolidating files from different web pages.

Dictionary of Nautical Terms

  1. dispatch

    All duty is required to be performed with diligence.

Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

  1. dispatch

    An official military letter sent by the commander of an army in the field to the authorities at home. The term is also applied to the military letters giving an account of military operations sent by subordinate officers holding detached commands to the general of an army in the field. See Dispatches.

Suggested Resources

  1. dispatch

    Song lyrics by dispatch -- Explore a large variety of song lyrics performed by dispatch on the Lyrics.com website.

How to pronounce dispatch?

  1. Alex
    Alex
    US English
    Daniel
    Daniel
    British
    Karen
    Karen
    Australian
    Veena
    Veena
    Indian

How to say dispatch in sign language?

  1. dispatch

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of dispatch in Chaldean Numerology is: 2

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of dispatch in Pythagorean Numerology is: 8

Examples of dispatch in a Sentence

  1. John Jensen:

    If you are able to safely and humanely dispatch of the animal, we encourage that and we want that information too.

  2. Donna Jackson:

    The St. Louis Post-Dispatch was not The St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

  3. Jennifer Cafarella:

    ISIS appears to dispatch advisers to support local recruitment in such areas in an attempt to bolster the local strength of these groups, but does not augment their ranks with its own forces.

  4. Samuel Alito:

    The Court has expressed the hope that the Court of Appeals will proceed with appropriate dispatch, and I see no reason why the Court of Appeals should not be able to decide this case, one way or the other, within the next 60 days.

  5. Sheriff Sharon Wehrly:

    During that call, the reporting parties informed the Nye County Sheriff’s Office dispatch the male had been using cocaine, they confirmed his usage on Saturday but were unsure if it had continued.

Images & Illustrations of dispatch

  1. dispatchdispatchdispatchdispatchdispatch

Popularity rank by frequency of use

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Translations for dispatch

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

  • телеграма, бързам, депеша, експедиция, пращамBulgarian
  • Besiegen, Entziehen, Versenden, Verschicken, BeeilenGerman
  • βιάζομαιGreek
  • depeŝoEsperanto
  • privar, envío urgente, despacharse, despachar, despacho, envío, comunicadoSpanish
  • lähettää, tappaaFinnish
  • elküldeni, feladásHungarian
  • dispaccioItalian
  • לְשַׁגֵרHebrew
  • ablēgātiōLatin
  • verzendenDutch
  • ekspedere, (av)sendeNorwegian
  • спешить, депеша, отправлять, лишать, расправлятьсяRussian
  • omintetgöraSwedish
  • yollama, yoksun bırakma, sevk etme, acele etme, mahrum etme, gönderme, yenmeTurkish
  • cử điVietnamese
  • 调度Chinese

Get even more translations for dispatch »

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    showing intellectual penetration or emotional depth
    • A. dependable
    • B. occasional
    • C. opaque
    • D. profound

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