What does digression mean?

Definitions for digression
dɪˈgrɛʃ ən, daɪ-di·gres·sion

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word digression.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. digression, aside, excursus, divagation, parenthesisnoun

    a message that departs from the main subject

  2. diversion, deviation, digression, deflection, deflexion, divagationnoun

    a turning aside (of your course or attention or concern)

    "a diversion from the main highway"; "a digression into irrelevant details"; "a deflection from his goal"

  3. digression, excursionnoun

    wandering from the main path of a journey

Wiktionary

  1. digressionnoun

    A departure from the subject, course, or idea at hand; an exploration of a different or unrelated concern.

    The lectures included lengthy digressions on topics ranging from the professor's dog to the meaning of life.

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. Digressionnoun

    Etymology: digressio, Latin.

    The good man thought so much of his late conceived commonwealth, that all other matters were but digressions to him. Philip Sidney, b. i.

    He, she knew, would intermix
    Grateful digressions, and solve high dispute
    With conjugal caresses. John Milton, Paradise Lost, b. viii.

    Here some digression I must make, t’ accuse
    Thee, my forgetful and ungrateful muse. John Denham.

    To content and fill the eye of the understanding, the best authors sprinkle their works with pleasing digressions, with which they recreate the minds of their readers. John Dryden, Dufresn.

    The digression of the sun is not equal; but near the equinoctial intersections, it is right and greater; near the solstices, more oblique and lesser. Thomas Browne, Vulgar Errours, b. vi. c. 4.

Wikipedia

  1. Digression

    Digression (parékbasis in Greek, egressio, digressio and excursion in Latin) is a section of a composition or speech that marks a temporary shift of subject; the digression ends when the writer or speaker returns to the main topic. Digressions can be used intentionally as a stylistic or rhetorical device. In classical rhetoric since Corax of Syracuse, especially in Institutio Oratoria of Quintilian, the digression was a regular part of any oration or composition. After setting out the topic of a work and establishing the need for attention to be given, the speaker or author would digress to a seemingly disconnected subject before returning to a development of the composition's theme, a proof of its validity, and a conclusion. A schizothemia is a digression by means of a long reminiscence. Cicero was a master of digression, particularly in his ability to shift from the specific question or issue at hand (the hypothesis) to the more general issue or question that it depended upon (the thesis). As was the case with most ancient orators, Cicero's apparent digression always turned out to bear directly upon the issue at hand. During the Second Sophistic (in Imperial Rome), the ability to guide a speech away from a stated theme and then back again with grace and skill came to be a mark of true eloquence.

ChatGPT

  1. digression

    Digression is a temporary departure from the main subject or topic in speech or writing. It involves shifting focus from the central theme or narrative, often to provide additional information or details, which may or may not be directly related to the primary subject matter. Digressions can serve as a literary device to add depth, context, or a different perspective to the matter being discussed.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Digressionnoun

    the act of digressing or deviating, esp. from the main subject of a discourse; hence, a part of a discourse deviating from its main design or subject

  2. Digressionnoun

    a turning aside from the right path; transgression; offense

  3. Digressionnoun

    the elongation, or angular distance from the sun; -- said chiefly of the inferior planets

  4. Etymology: [L. digressio: cf. F. digression.]

Wikidata

  1. Digression

    Digression is a section of a composition or speech that is an intentional change of subject. In Classical rhetoric since Corax of Syracuse, especially in Institutio Oratoria of Quintilian, the digression was a regular part of any oration or composition.. After setting out the topic of a work and establishing the need for attention to be given, the speaker or author would digress to a seemingly disconnected subject before returning to a development of the composition's theme, a proof of its validity, and a conclusion. This use of the digression is still noticeable in many sermons: after the topic, the speaker will introduce a "story" that seems to be unrelated, return to the subject, and then reveal how the story illustrates the speaker's point. A schizothemia is a digression by means of a long reminiscence. Cicero was a master of digression, particularly in his ability to shift from the specific question or issue at hand to the more general issue or question that it depended upon. As was the case with most ancient orators, Cicero's apparent digression always turned out to bear directly upon the issue at hand. During the Second Sophist, the ability to guide a speech away from a stated theme and then back again with grace and skill came to be a mark of true eloquence.

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of digression in Chaldean Numerology is: 7

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of digression in Pythagorean Numerology is: 2

Popularity rank by frequency of use

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"digression." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 19 Jun 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/digression>.

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