What does depression mean?

Definitions for depression
dɪˈprɛʃ ənde·pres·sion

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word depression.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. depression(noun)

    a mental state characterized by a pessimistic sense of inadequacy and a despondent lack of activity

  2. depression, slump, economic crisis(noun)

    a long-term economic state characterized by unemployment and low prices and low levels of trade and investment

  3. natural depression, depression(noun)

    a sunken or depressed geological formation

  4. depression(noun)

    sad feelings of gloom and inadequacy

  5. Depression, Great Depression(noun)

    a period during the 1930s when there was a worldwide economic depression and mass unemployment

  6. low, depression(noun)

    an air mass of lower pressure; often brings precipitation

    "a low moved in over night bringing sleet and snow"

  7. depressive disorder, clinical depression, depression(noun)

    a state of depression and anhedonia so severe as to require clinical intervention

  8. depression, impression, imprint(noun)

    a concavity in a surface produced by pressing

    "he left the impression of his fingers in the soft mud"

  9. depression(noun)

    angular distance below the horizon (especially of a celestial object)

  10. depression(noun)

    pushing down

    "depression of the space bar on the typewriter"

Wiktionary

  1. depression(Noun)

    an area that is lower in topography than its surroundings

    Etymology: From depressio.

  2. depression(Noun)

    in psychotherapy and psychiatry, a state of mind producing serious, long-term lowering of enjoyment of life or inability to visualize a happy future

    Etymology: From depressio.

  3. depression(Noun)

    in psychotherapy and psychiatry, a period of unhappiness or low morale which lasts longer than several weeks and may include ideation of self-inflicted injury or suicide

    Etymology: From depressio.

  4. depression(Noun)

    an area of lowered air pressure that generally brings moist weather, sometimes promoting hurricanes and tornadoes

    Etymology: From depressio.

  5. depression(Noun)

    a period of major economic contraction;

    Etymology: From depressio.

  6. depression(Noun)

    Four consecutive quarters of negative, real GDP growth. See NBER.

    The Great Depression was an event in US history.

    Etymology: From depressio.

  7. depression(Noun)

    a lowering, in particular a reduction in a particular biological variable or the function of an organ, in contrast to elevation

    Etymology: From depressio.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Depression(noun)

    the act of depressing

  2. Depression(noun)

    the state of being depressed; a sinking

  3. Depression(noun)

    a falling in of the surface; a sinking below its true place; a cavity or hollow; as, roughness consists in little protuberances and depressions

  4. Depression(noun)

    humiliation; abasement, as of pride

  5. Depression(noun)

    dejection; despondency; lowness

  6. Depression(noun)

    diminution, as of trade, etc.; inactivity; dullness

  7. Depression(noun)

    the angular distance of a celestial object below the horizon

  8. Depression(noun)

    the operation of reducing to a lower degree; -- said of equations

  9. Depression(noun)

    a method of operating for cataract; couching. See Couch, v. t., 8

Freebase

  1. Depression

    Depression is a state of low mood and aversion to activity that can affect a person's thoughts, behavior, feelings and sense of well-being. Depressed people may feel sad, anxious, empty, hopeless, worried, helpless, worthless, guilty, irritable, hurt, or restless. They may lose interest in activities that once were pleasurable, experience loss of appetite or overeating, have problems concentrating, remembering details, or making decisions, and may contemplate or attempt suicide. Insomnia, excessive sleeping, fatigue, loss of energy, or aches, pains, or digestive problems that are resistant to treatment may also be present. Depressed mood is not necessarily a psychiatric disorder. It may be a normal reaction to certain life events, a symptom of some medical conditions, or a side effect of some drugs or medical treatments. Depressed mood is also a primary or associated feature of certain psychiatric syndromes such as clinical depression.

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Depression

    Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.

Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

  1. depression

    The pointing of any piece of ordnance so that its shot may be projected short of the point-blank.

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'depression' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #4119

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'depression' in Written Corpus Frequency: #4588

  3. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'depression' in Nouns Frequency: #1638

How to pronounce depression?

  1. Alex
    Alex
    US English
    Daniel
    Daniel
    British
    Karen
    Karen
    Australian
    Veena
    Veena
    Indian

How to say depression in sign language?

  1. depression

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of depression in Chaldean Numerology is: 7

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of depression in Pythagorean Numerology is: 7

Examples of depression in a Sentence

  1. The President:

    We can't keep this country closed. This is a massive country with a massive economy. People are losing their jobs, they're committing suicide. There's depression, alcohol, drugs at a level that nobody's ever seen before. There's abuse, tremendous abuse. We have to open our country. You know, I've said it often -- the cure can not be worse than the problem itself.

  2. Donald Duncan:

    In 1997 we were the fastest growing manufacturing metro area in the country and four years later it collapsed, what you can see on the ground today is 3,000 job openings. China's emergence as the world's low-cost producer and export superpower following its World Trade Organization entry in 2001 dealt a heavy blow to traditional industrial communities such as Hickory. Economists David Autor, David Dorn and Gordon Hanson have tried to separate the impact of trade from other factors affecting U.S. manufacturing employment and they estimate that between 1990 and 2007 Hickory lost 16 percent of its manufacturing jobs just due to surging imports from China. DEEP SCARS. Buffeted by other headwinds, such as the 1994 North American Free Trade agreement and the lifting of textile quotas in 2004, the area lost 40,000 manufacturing jobs overall, half the total, between 2000 and 2009. Nationally, more than 5 million manufacturing jobs have disappeared since 2000, a period that also included the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression. The collapse left deep and still visible scars that help explain the appeal of Trump's pledge to bring back manufacturing's glory days. In Hickory, disability rolls soared more than 50 percent between 2000 and 2014, swollen by older workers who struggled to return to the workforce. At the same time, the share of the 25-34 year old in the population fell by almost a fifth between 2000 and 2010. Consequently, even as the unemployment rate tumbled from a peak above 15 percent in 2010 to 4.6 percent today, below the national average, so did the labor force participation rate. It fell from above 68 percent in 2000 to below 59 percent in 2014. Poverty levels doubled. Yet the manufacturing upswing in areas that suffered the most during the downturn is evident. Rust belt states, such as Michigan, Indiana and Ohio that may prove pivotal in the Nov. 8 presidential election, have been adding manufacturing jobs faster than the economy as a whole. Michigan, for example, which lost nearly half of its manufacturing jobs between 2000 and 2009, has since then seen a 25 percent rise, well above the 4 percent gain nationally. Manufacturing employment there is still well below the levels in the 1990s. Economists debate whether returning to that level is realistic given technological advances that have reduced manufacturing's share of the workforce from a high of above 30 percent in the 1950s to around 8 percent today. But they also feel that have already seen the bottom, particularly when it comes to China's impact.

  3. Alyssa Dweck:

    Neurotransmitter chemicals like serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine are involved in sexual response and orgasm, but they’re also influenced by medications that treat anxiety and depression.

  4. John Niklasson:

    One day a few years ago I did medical rounds and I met an old lady, who told me, ‘ Doc, I don’t have any reason to live, ’ she did n’t say this as part of a suicidal depression, more like a dry statement.

  5. Leonard Cohen:

    The term clinical depression finds its way into too many conversations these days. One has a sense that a catastrophe has occurred in the psychic landscape.

Images & Illustrations of depression

  1. depressiondepressiondepressiondepressiondepression

Popularity rank by frequency of use

depression#1#4452#10000

Translations for depression

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

Get even more translations for depression »

Translation

Find a translation for the depression definition in other languages:

Select another language:

  • - Select -
  • 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified)
  • 繁體中文 (Chinese - Traditional)
  • Español (Spanish)
  • Esperanto (Esperanto)
  • 日本語 (Japanese)
  • Português (Portuguese)
  • Deutsch (German)
  • العربية (Arabic)
  • Français (French)
  • Русский (Russian)
  • ಕನ್ನಡ (Kannada)
  • 한국어 (Korean)
  • עברית (Hebrew)
  • Gaeilge (Irish)
  • Українська (Ukrainian)
  • اردو (Urdu)
  • Magyar (Hungarian)
  • मानक हिन्दी (Hindi)
  • Indonesia (Indonesian)
  • Italiano (Italian)
  • தமிழ் (Tamil)
  • Türkçe (Turkish)
  • తెలుగు (Telugu)
  • ภาษาไทย (Thai)
  • Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese)
  • Čeština (Czech)
  • Polski (Polish)
  • Bahasa Indonesia (Indonesian)
  • Românește (Romanian)
  • Nederlands (Dutch)
  • Ελληνικά (Greek)
  • Latinum (Latin)
  • Svenska (Swedish)
  • Dansk (Danish)
  • Suomi (Finnish)
  • فارسی (Persian)
  • ייִדיש (Yiddish)
  • հայերեն (Armenian)
  • Norsk (Norwegian)
  • English (English)

Word of the Day

Would you like us to send you a FREE new word definition delivered to your inbox daily?

Please enter your email address:


Discuss these depression definitions with the community:

0 Comments

    Citation

    Use the citation below to add this definition to your bibliography:

    Style:MLAChicagoAPA

    "depression." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2021. Web. 21 Apr. 2021. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/depression>.

    Are we missing a good definition for depression? Don't keep it to yourself...

    Browse Definitions.net

    Free, no signup required:

    Add to Chrome

    Get instant definitions for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

    Free, no signup required:

    Add to Firefox

    Get instant definitions for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

    Quiz

    Are you a words master?

    »
    discover or determine the existence, presence, or fact of
    • A. conceal
    • B. interrogate
    • C. adventure
    • D. observe

    Nearby & related entries:

    Alternative searches for depression:


    Definitions.net

    Thanks for your vote! We truly appreciate your support.