What does crime mean?

Definitions for crime
kraɪmcrime

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word crime.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. crime, offense, criminal offense, criminal offence, offence, law-breakingnoun

    (criminal law) an act punishable by law; usually considered an evil act

    "a long record of crimes"

  2. crimenoun

    an evil act not necessarily punishable by law

    "crimes of the heart"

Wiktionary

  1. crimenoun

    A specific act committed in violation of the law.

  2. crimenoun

    The practice or habit of committing crimes.

    Crime doesn't pay.

  3. Etymology: crimen from cernere

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. CRIMEnoun

    An act contrary to right; an offence; a great fault; an act of wickedness.

    Etymology: crimen, Lat. crime, French.

    High God be witness, that I guiltless am;
    But if yourself, sir knight, ye guilty find,
    Or wrapped be in loves of former dame,
    With crime do not it cover, but disclose the same. Fairy Qu.

    No crime was thine, if ’tis no crime to love. Alexander Pope.

Wikipedia

  1. Crime

    In ordinary language, a crime is an unlawful act punishable by a state or other authority. The term crime does not, in modern criminal law, have any simple and universally accepted definition, though statutory definitions have been provided for certain purposes. The most popular view is that crime is a category created by law; in other words, something is a crime if declared as such by the relevant and applicable law. One proposed definition is that a crime or offence (or criminal offence) is an act harmful not only to some individual but also to a community, society, or the state ("a public wrong"). Such acts are forbidden and punishable by law.The notion that acts such as murder, rape, and theft are to be prohibited exists worldwide. What precisely is a criminal offence is defined by criminal law of each country. While many have a catalogue of crimes called the criminal code, in some common law countries no such comprehensive statute exists. The state (government) has the power to severely restrict one's liberty for committing a crime. In modern societies, there are procedures to which investigations and trials must adhere. If found guilty, an offender may be sentenced to a form of reparation such as a community sentence, or, depending on the nature of their offence, to undergo imprisonment, life imprisonment or, in some jurisdictions, execution. Usually, to be classified as a crime, the "act of doing something criminal" (actus reus) must – with certain exceptions – be accompanied by the "intention to do something criminal" (mens rea).While every crime violates the law, not every violation of the law counts as a crime. Breaches of private law (torts and breaches of contract) are not automatically punished by the state, but can be enforced through civil procedure.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Crimenoun

    any violation of law, either divine or human; an omission of a duty commanded, or the commission of an act forbidden by law

  2. Crimenoun

    gross violation of human law, in distinction from a misdemeanor or trespass, or other slight offense. Hence, also, any aggravated offense against morality or the public welfare; any outrage or great wrong

  3. Crimenoun

    any great wickedness or sin; iniquity

  4. Crimenoun

    that which occasion crime

Freebase

  1. Crime

    A crime, also called an offence or a criminal offence, is an act harmful not only to some individual, but also to the community or the state. Such acts are forbidden and punishable by law. The idea that acts like murder, rape and theft are prohibited exists all around the world, and probably has universal moral basis. What precisely is a criminal offence is defined by criminal law of each country. While many have a catalogue of crimes called the criminal code, in some common law countries no such a comprehensive statute exists. The state has the power to severely restrict one's liberty for committing a crime. Therefore, in modern societies, a criminal procedure must be adhered to during the investigation and trial. Only if found guilty, the offender may be sentenced to punishment such as community sentence, imprisonment, life imprisonment or, in some jurisdictions, even death. To be classified as a crime, the act of doing something bad must be usually accompanied by the intention to do something bad, with certain exceptions. While every crime violates the law, not every violation of the law counts as a crime. Breaches of private law are not automatically punished by the state, but can be enforced through civil procedure.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Crime

    krīm, n. a violation of law: an act punishable by law: offence: sin.—adjs. Crime′ful, criminal; Crime′less, without crime, innocent; Criminal (krim′-), relating to crime: guilty of crime: violating laws.—n. one guilty of crime.—ns. Crim′inalist, one versed in criminal law; Criminal′ity, guiltiness.—adv. Crim′inally.—v.t. Crim′ināte, to accuse.—n. Criminā′tion, act of criminating: accusation.—adjs. Crim′inātive, Crim′inātory, involving crimination or accusation.—ns. Criminol′ogist; Criminol′ogy, that branch of anthropology which treats of crime and criminals.—adj. Crim′inous, criminal—now chiefly in the phrase 'a criminous clerk.'—n. Crim′inousness.—Criminal conversation, often Crim. con., adultery. [Fr.,—L. crimen.]

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Crime

    A violation of the criminal law, i.e., a breach of the conduct code specifically sanctioned by the state, which through its administrative agencies prosecutes offenders and imposes and administers punishments. The concept includes unacceptable actions whether prosecuted or going unpunished.

Suggested Resources

  1. crime

    The crime symbol -- In this Symbols.com article you will learn about the meaning of the crime symbol and its characteristic.

  2. crime

    Song lyrics by crime -- Explore a large variety of song lyrics performed by crime on the Lyrics.com website.

Matched Categories

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'crime' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #1455

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'crime' in Written Corpus Frequency: #1875

  3. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'crime' in Nouns Frequency: #521

How to pronounce crime?

How to say crime in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of crime in Chaldean Numerology is: 6

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of crime in Pythagorean Numerology is: 3

Examples of crime in a Sentence

  1. Alejandro Hope:

    Secondly, this speaks to the changes in criminal groups, with the evolution of crime, it becomes much more important to gain control over territory, over local governments.

  2. Kathryn Kase:

    Mr. Panetti is a sick man who has suffered from schizophrenia, an incurable mental illness, for over thirty years, including prior to and during the crime, and during his trial at which he represented himself in a floridly psychotic state.

  3. Patrick Curley:

    This is nothing like the 70s or 80s, crime levels here dip down and go back up, but it's still no comparison. To someone new to New York City New York City feels like things are going downhill, but New York always comes back.

  4. Official Palestinian news agency WAFA:

    The president has condemned the crime in the strongest terms possible and has ordered the members of the (investigation) committee to travel immediately to Bulgaria to discover what happened.

  5. Randy McNally:

    It is to prevent what has happened in other cities like Portland and Washington, DC, if people, knowingly violate the law, knowingly thumb their nose at authority and don't do what authorities have requested they do, they should be charged with a serious crime.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

crime#1#2010#10000

Translations for crime

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