What does credence mean?

Definitions for credence
ˈkrid nscre·dence

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word credence.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. credence, acceptancenoun

    the mental attitude that something is believable and should be accepted as true

    "he gave credence to the gossip"; "acceptance of Newtonian mechanics was unquestioned for 200 years"

  2. credenza, credencenoun

    a kind of sideboard or buffet

Wiktionary

  1. credencenoun

    Acceptance of a belief or claim as true, especially on the basis of evidence.

    Based on the scientific data, I give credence to this hypothesis.

  2. credencenoun

    Credential or supporting material for a person or claim.

    He presented us with a letter of credence.

  3. credencenoun

    A small table or credenza used in certain Christian religious services.

  4. credenceverb

    To give credence to; to believe.

  5. Etymology: From credence, from credentia, from credens, present active participle of credo.

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. CREDENCEnoun

    Etymology: from credo, Lat. credence, Norman Fr.

    Ne let it seem, that credence this exceeds;
    For he that made the same was known right well,
    To have done much more admirable deeds;
    It Merlin was. Fairy Queen, b. i. cant.
    7. stan. 36.

    Love and wisdom,
    Approv’d so to your majesty, may plead
    For ample credence. William Shakespeare, All’s well that ends well.

    They did not only underhand give out that this was the true earl, but the friar, finding some credence in the people, took boldness in the pulpit to declare as much. Francis Bacon, H. VII.

    After they had delivered to the king their letters of credence, they were led to a chamber richly furnished. John Hayward.

ChatGPT

  1. credence

    Credence is the belief in or acceptance of something as true. It can also refer to the likelihood or probability that something is the case. In some contexts, it may also refer to a token or item of belief or faith.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Credencenoun

    reliance of the mind on evidence of facts derived from other sources than personal knowledge; belief; credit; confidence

  2. Credencenoun

    that which gives a claim to credit, belief, or confidence; as, a letter of credence

  3. Credencenoun

    the small table by the side of the altar or communion table, on which the bread and wine are placed before being consecrated

  4. Credencenoun

    a cupboard, sideboard, or cabinet, particularly one intended for the display of rich vessels or plate, and consisting chiefly of open shelves for that purpose

  5. Credenceverb

    to give credence to; to believe

  6. Etymology: [LL. credentia, fr. L. credens, -entis, p. pr. of credere to trust, believe: cf. OF. credence. See Creed, and cf. Credent, Creance.]

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Credence

    krē′dens, n. belief: trust: the small table beside the altar on which the bread and wine are placed before being consecrated.—n. Creden′dum, a thing to be believed, an act of faith:—pl. Credenda.—adjs. Crē′dent, easy of belief; Creden′tial, giving a title to belief or credit.—n. that which entitles to credit or confidence: (pl.) esp. the letters by which one claims confidence or authority among strangers.—ns. Credibil′ity, Cred′ibleness.—adj. Credible (kred′-), that may be believed.—adv. Cred′ibly.—n. Cred′it, belief: esteem: reputation: honour: good character: sale on trust: time allowed for payment: the side of an account on which payments received are entered: a sum placed at a person's disposal in a bank on which he may draw to its amount.—v.t. to believe: to trust: to sell or lend to on trust: to enter on the credit side of an account: to set to the credit of.—adj. Cred′itable, trustworthy: bringing credit or honour.—n. Cred′itableness.—adv. Cred′itably.—ns. Cred′itor, one to whom a debt is due:—fem. Cred′itrix; Crē′do, the Creed, or a musical setting of it for church services; Credū′lity, credulousness: disposition to believe on insufficient evidence.—adj. Cred′ulous, easy of belief: apt to believe without sufficient evidence: unsuspecting.—adv. Cred′ulously.—ns. Cred′ulousness; Creed, a summary of articles of religious belief, esp. those called the Apostles', Nicene, and Athanasian: any system of belief. [Fr.,—Low L. credentia—L. credent-, believing, pr.p. of credĕre.]

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of credence in Chaldean Numerology is: 5

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of credence in Pythagorean Numerology is: 3

Examples of credence in a Sentence

  1. Matthew Mish:

    There is some credence to the number of statements companies are making [about the impact] on liquidity and profits, but I don’t think it will be a death blow to high-yield by any stretch.

  2. Darius Longarino:

    Survivors in Xianzi's position face near-insurmountable odds because courts give little credence to testimony and are looking for' smoking gun' evidence, zhu Jun is powerful, and it seems like outside political pressure was tipping the scales even further in Zhu Jun favor.

  3. RJ Intindola:

    When someone is not present to defend themselves don’t participate in a smearing campaign because you give credence to their cowardly actions.

  4. Kristin Hammersmith:

    This paper kind of puts together what the level of evidence is for this being a good modality, but the kind of randomized control trials we’re taught to really give a lot of credence to in medicine don’t exist for punctal plugs … probably because people have used them for a long time, they seem to work and it has n’t been too exciting for individuals or industries to sponsor big randomized control trials comparing this to not using plugs.

  5. Kristin Hammersmith:

    This paper kind of puts together what the level of evidence is for this being a good modality, but the kind of randomized control trials we’re taught to really give a lot of credence to in medicine don’t exist for punctal plugs… probably because people have used them for a long time, they seem to work and it hasn’t been too exciting for individuals or industries to sponsor big randomized control trials comparing this to not using plugs.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

credence#10000#42666#100000

Translations for credence

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"credence." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 28 May 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/credence>.

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