What does copper mean?

Definitions for copper
ˈkɒp ərcop·per

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word copper.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. copper, Cu, atomic number 29noun

    a ductile malleable reddish-brown corrosion-resistant diamagnetic metallic element; occurs in various minerals but is the only metal that occurs abundantly in large masses; used as an electrical and thermal conductor

  2. coppernoun

    a copper penny

  3. bull, cop, copper, fuzz, pignoun

    uncomplimentary terms for a policeman

  4. copper, copper colornoun

    a reddish-brown color resembling the color of polished copper

  5. copperverb

    any of various small butterflies of the family Lycaenidae having coppery wings

  6. copperverb

    coat with a layer of copper

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. COPPERnoun

    One of the six primitive metals.

    Etymology: koper, Dut. cuprum, Latin.

    Copper is the most ductile and malleable metal, after gold and silver. Of a mixture of copper and lapis calaminaris is formed brass; a composition of copper and tin makes bell-metal; and copper and brass, melted in equal quantities, produces what the French call bronze, used for figures and statues. Ephraim Chambers.

    Copper is heavier than iron or tin; but lighter than silver, lead, and gold. It is not unfrequently found native in a malleable state, but in small quantities. In the state of ore it makes, according to its various admixtures, many very different appearances. The richer copper ores are found in many parts of Germany and Sweden; and we have some in England little inferior to the finest Swedish. John Hill, on Fossils.

    Two vessels of fine copper, precious as gold. Ezra, viii. 27.

  2. Coppernoun

    A vessel made of copper; commonly used for a boiler larger than a moveable pot.

    They boiled it in a copper to the half; then they poured it into earthen vessels. Francis Bacon, Natural History, №. 848.

Wikipedia

  1. Copper

    Copper is a chemical element with the symbol Cu (from Latin: cuprum) and atomic number 29. It is a soft, malleable, and ductile metal with very high thermal and electrical conductivity. A freshly exposed surface of pure copper has a pinkish-orange color. Copper is used as a conductor of heat and electricity, as a building material, and as a constituent of various metal alloys, such as sterling silver used in jewelry, cupronickel used to make marine hardware and coins, and constantan used in strain gauges and thermocouples for temperature measurement. Copper is one of the few metals that can occur in nature in a directly usable metallic form (native metals). This led to very early human use in several regions, from circa 8000 BC. Thousands of years later, it was the first metal to be smelted from sulfide ores, circa 5000 BC; the first metal to be cast into a shape in a mold, c. 4000 BC; and the first metal to be purposely alloyed with another metal, tin, to create bronze, c. 3500 BC.In the Roman era, copper was mined principally on Cyprus, the origin of the name of the metal, from aes cyprium (metal of Cyprus), later corrupted to cuprum (Latin). Coper (Old English) and copper were derived from this, the later spelling first used around 1530.Commonly encountered compounds are copper(II) salts, which often impart blue or green colors to such minerals as azurite, malachite, and turquoise, and have been used widely and historically as pigments. Copper used in buildings, usually for roofing, oxidizes to form a green verdigris (or patina). Copper is sometimes used in decorative art, both in its elemental metal form and in compounds as pigments. Copper compounds are used as bacteriostatic agents, fungicides, and wood preservatives. Copper is essential to all living organisms as a trace dietary mineral because it is a key constituent of the respiratory enzyme complex cytochrome c oxidase. In molluscs and crustaceans, copper is a constituent of the blood pigment hemocyanin, replaced by the iron-complexed hemoglobin in fish and other vertebrates. In humans, copper is found mainly in the liver, muscle, and bone. The adult body contains between 1.4 and 2.1 mg of copper per kilogram of body weight.

ChatGPT

  1. copper

    Copper is a type of chemical element with the symbol Cu and atomic number 29. It is a soft, malleable, and ductile metal with very high thermal and electrical conductivity. It has a pinkish-orange color and is one of the few metallic elements that occur in pure form in nature. Copper is an essential nutrient to all high plants and animals and is often used in manufacturing products such as electrical wiring, pipes, coins, and jewelry.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Coppernoun

    a common metal of a reddish color, both ductile and malleable, and very tenacious. It is one of the best conductors of heat and electricity. Symbol Cu. Atomic weight 63.3. It is one of the most useful metals in itself, and also in its alloys, brass and bronze

  2. Coppernoun

    a coin made of copper; a penny, cent, or other minor coin of copper

  3. Coppernoun

    a vessel, especially a large boiler, made of copper

  4. Coppernoun

    the boilers in the galley for cooking; as, a ship's coppers

  5. Copperverb

    to cover or coat with copper; to sheathe with sheets of copper; as, to copper a ship

  6. Etymology: [OE. coper (cf. D. koper, Sw. koppar, Dan. kobber, G. kupfer), LL. cuper, fr. L. cuprum for earlier Cyprium, Cyprium aes, i.e., Cyprian brass, fr. Gr. of Cyprus (Gr. ), anciently renowned for its copper mines. Cf. Cypreous.]

Wikidata

  1. Copper

    Copper is a chemical element with the symbol Cu and atomic number 29. It is a ductile metal with very high thermal and electrical conductivity. Pure copper is soft and malleable; a freshly exposed surface has a reddish-orange color. It is used as a conductor of heat and electricity, a building material, and a constituent of various metal alloys. The metal and its alloys have been used for thousands of years. In the Roman era, copper was principally mined on Cyprus, hence the origin of the name of the metal as сyprium, later shortened to сuprum. Its compounds are commonly encountered as copper salts, which often impart blue or green colors to minerals such as azurite and turquoise and have been widely used historically as pigments. Architectural structures built with copper corrode to give green verdigris. Decorative art prominently features copper, both by itself and as part of pigments. Copper is essential to all living organisms as a trace dietary mineral because it is a key constituent of the respiratory enzyme complex cytochrome c oxidase. In molluscs and crustacea copper is a constituent of the blood pigment hemocyanin, which is replaced by the iron-complexed hemoglobin in fish and other vertebrates. The main areas where copper is found in humans are liver, muscle and bone. Copper compounds are used as bacteriostatic substances, fungicides, and wood preservatives.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Copper

    kop′ėr, n. a moderately hard metal of a fine red colour, perhaps the first metal employed by man: money made of copper—e.g. 'a copper' = a penny or halfpenny: a vessel made of copper.—adj. made of copper: copper-coloured.—v.t. to cover with copper.—adj. Copp′er-bott′omed, having the bottom covered with copper, as a ship—n. Copp′er-cap′tain, one who styles himself captain without grounds.—adjs. Copp′er-faced, faced with copper, as type; Copp′er-fas′tened, fastened with copper bolts.—ns. Copp′er-head, a United States snake: (U.S.) a northern sympathiser with the South in the Civil War; Copp′ering, the act of sheathing with copper: a covering of copper.—adjs. Copp′erish, Copp′ery, Cū′preous, containing or like copper.—ns. Copp′er-nick′el, arsenical nickel, niccolite; Copp′er-nose, a red nose caused by intemperance; Copp′erplate, a plate of polished copper on which something has been engraved: an impression taken from the plate; Copp′er-pyrī′tes, a double sulphide of copper and iron of yellow hue; Copp′er-smith, a smith who works in copper; Copp′er-work, a place where copper is wrought or manufactured; Copp′erworm, the ship-worm.—Hot coppers, parched tongue and throat after a bout of drinking. [Low L. cuper—L. cuprum, a contr. of cyprium aes, 'Cyprian brass,' because found in Cyprus.]

The New Hacker's Dictionary

  1. copper

    Conventional electron-carrying network cable with a core conductor of copper — or aluminum! Opposed to light pipe or, say, a short-range microwave link.

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Copper

    A heavy metal trace element with the atomic symbol Cu, atomic number 29, and atomic weight 63.55.

Suggested Resources

  1. copper

    The copper symbol -- In this Symbols.com article you will learn about the meaning of the copper symbol and its characteristic.

  2. copper

    Song lyrics by copper -- Explore a large variety of song lyrics performed by copper on the Lyrics.com website.

Etymology and Origins

  1. Copper

    A policeman, from the thieves’ slang cop, to take, catch.

Surnames Frequency by Census Records

  1. COPPER

    According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Copper is ranked #10030 in terms of the most common surnames in America.

    The Copper surname appeared 3,211 times in the 2010 census and if you were to sample 100,000 people in the United States, approximately 1 would have the surname Copper.

    56.8% or 1,825 total occurrences were White.
    36.6% or 1,178 total occurrences were Black.
    2.9% or 95 total occurrences were of two or more races.
    2.4% or 78 total occurrences were of Hispanic origin.
    0.6% or 22 total occurrences were American Indian or Alaskan Native.
    0.4% or 13 total occurrences were Asian.

Matched Categories

British National Corpus

  1. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'copper' in Written Corpus Frequency: #3942

  2. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'copper' in Nouns Frequency: #1928

How to pronounce copper?

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of copper in Chaldean Numerology is: 6

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of copper in Pythagorean Numerology is: 1

Examples of copper in a Sentence

  1. Julia Wang:

    Indeed, demand for commodities (coal, iron ore, crude oil, copper) have slowed across the board, both in volume as well as value terms. This suggests that the domestic industrial sector has probably slowed over the month.

  2. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration:

    Marine life is prevalent on the wreck, except on the copper sheathing which still retains its antifouling ability to keep the hull free of marine organism.

  3. Rizal Ramli:

    There is an opportunity, and it is in Newmont's copper and gold mine, which is currently controlled by Newmont America and Sumitomo and there is an Indonesian partner, the Merukh family, and others.

  4. Daniel Malchuk:

    If you look at our copper portfolio, these are assets that will be operating for decades. So the value of our assets is not dependent on what happens today or in six months time. It is dependent on what is going to happen in the next 10 or 20 years.

  5. Robert Friedland:

    But now even Joe Biden has said he will support the mining of copper in the United States because they know they need it.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

copper#1#4678#10000

Translations for copper

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"copper." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 19 May 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/copper>.

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