What does conviction mean?

Definitions for conviction
kənˈvɪk ʃəncon·vic·tion

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word conviction.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. conviction, strong belief, article of faithnoun

    an unshakable belief in something without need for proof or evidence

  2. conviction, judgment of conviction, condemnation, sentencenoun

    (criminal law) a final judgment of guilty in a criminal case and the punishment that is imposed

    "the conviction came as no surprise"

Wiktionary

  1. convictionnoun

    A firmly held belief.

  2. convictionnoun

    A judgement of guilt in a court of law.

  3. convictionnoun

    The state of being found or proved guilty.

  4. convictionnoun

    The state of being convinced.

  5. Etymology: From conviction, from convictio, from convictus, the past participle of convinco.

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. Convictionnoun

    1.Detection of guilt, which is, in law, either when a man is outlawed, or appears and confesses, or else is found guilty by the inquest. John Cowell

    Etymology: from convict.

    The third best absent is condemn’d,
    Convict by flight, and rebel to all law;
    Conviction to the serpent none belongs. John Milton, Par. Lost.

    When therefore the apostle requireth hability to convict hereticks, can we think he judgeth it a thing unlawful, and not rather needful, to use the principal instrument of their conviction, the light of reason. Richard Hooker, b. iii. s. 8.

    The manner of his conviction was designed, not as a peculiar privilege to him; but as a standing miracle, a lasting argument, for the conviction of others, to the very end of the world. Francis Atterbury, Sermons.

    Their wisdom is only of this world, to put false colours upon things, to call good evil, and evil good, against the conviction of their own consciences. Jonathan Swift.

Wikipedia

  1. Conviction

    In law, a conviction is the verdict that usually results when a court of law finds a defendant guilty of a crime. The opposite of a conviction is an acquittal (that is, "not guilty"). In Scotland and in the Netherlands, there can also be a verdict of "not proven", which counts as an acquittal. There are also cases in which the court orders that a defendant not be convicted, despite being found guilty; in England, Wales, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand the mechanism for this is a discharge. For a host of reasons, the criminal justice system is not perfect: sometimes guilty defendants are acquitted, while innocent people are convicted. Appeal mechanisms and post conviction relief procedures may mitigate the effects of a conviction to some extent. An error which results in the conviction of an innocent person is known as a miscarriage of justice. After a defendant is convicted, the court determines the appropriate sentence as a punishment. Furthermore, the conviction may lead to results beyond the terms of the sentence itself. Such ramifications are known as the collateral consequences of criminal charges. A minor conviction is a warning conviction, and it does not affect the defendant but does serve as a warning.A history of convictions are called antecedents, known colloquially as "previous" in the United Kingdom, and "priors" in the United States and Australia. The history of convictions also shows that a minor law conviction can be prosecuted as any individual's punishment.

ChatGPT

  1. conviction

    Conviction is a strongly held belief or opinion. In the legal context, it refers to the formal declaration by a judge or court that someone is guilty of a criminal offense after a trial.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Convictionnoun

    the act of convicting; the act of proving, finding, or adjudging, guilty of an offense

  2. Convictionnoun

    a judgment of condemnation entered by a court having jurisdiction; the act or process of finding guilty, or the state of being found guilty of any crime by a legal tribunal

  3. Convictionnoun

    the act of convincing of error, or of compelling the admission of a truth; confutation

  4. Convictionnoun

    the state of being convinced or convicted; strong persuasion or belief; especially, the state of being convicted of sin, or by one's conscience

Wikidata

  1. Conviction

    In general, conviction means a strong persuasion or belief. It also means the state of being convinced. In law, a conviction is the verdict that results when a court of law finds a defendant guilty of a crime. The opposite of a conviction is an acquittal. In Scotland and in the Netherlands, there can also be a verdict of "not proven", which counts as an acquittal. There are also cases where the court orders that a defendant not be convicted, despite being found guilty. For a host of reasons, the criminal justice system is not perfect, and sometimes guilty defendants are acquitted, while innocent people are convicted. Appeal mechanisms mitigate this problem to some extent. An error which results in the conviction of an innocent person is known as a miscarriage of justice. After a defendant is convicted, the court determines the appropriate sentence as a punishment. Furthermore, the conviction may lead to results beyond the terms of the sentence itself. Such ramifications are known as the collateral consequences of criminal charges. A minor conviction is considered, in a term, a warning conviction, and it doesn't affect the defendant, but does serve as a warning.

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British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'conviction' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #4338

  2. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'conviction' in Nouns Frequency: #1450

How to pronounce conviction?

How to say conviction in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of conviction in Chaldean Numerology is: 6

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of conviction in Pythagorean Numerology is: 7

Examples of conviction in a Sentence

  1. Pope Francis:

    It is with the heaviest of hearts but with complete conviction for Charlie’s best interests that I find it is in Charlie’s best interests that I accede to these applications and rule that Great Ormond Street Hospital may lawfully withdraw all treatment save for palliative care to permit Charlie to die with dignity.

  2. Jeremy Batstone-Carr:

    The Fed's statement earlier in the week helped to squeeze us higher. But the market doesn't have a high degree of conviction at the moment, the outlook remains one of sub-trend growth and low inflation. The downgrades in Italy illustrate that we're not out of the woods as far as growth is concerned.

  3. Scott Peterson:

    Reading the tea leaves, it is a sign that the prosecution believes Nice won’t provide testimony that will overturn Peterson’s conviction, the state does not have to grant her immunity.

  4. Arizona Sheriff Babeu:

    To be clear, the backgrounds of the individuals in question would generally make them enforcement priorities for ICE. However, ICE has no legal basis for continuing to hold these individuals.One individual( Hermez) is a lawful permanent resident whose current conviction record does not make him legally removable. the sheriffs of Arizona have been forced to deal with many challenges due to lax enforcement of Criminal rules for U.S. immigration policies.

  5. Maxim Behar:

    Each of the three parties might have its arguments, but it is my strong conviction that the PR business will emerge on top in this future merger of the three industries.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

conviction#1#9120#10000

Translations for conviction

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"conviction." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 13 Apr. 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/conviction>.

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1 Comment
  • Clarence B. Dennis
    Clarence B. Dennis
    Thank much for the little definition of the word Conviction.
    LikeReply3 years ago

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