What does contracture mean?

Definitions for contracture
kənˈtræk tʃərcon·trac·ture

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word contracture.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. contracturenoun

    an abnormal and usually permanent contraction of a muscle

Wiktionary

  1. contracturenoun

    An abnormal, sometimes permanent, contraction of a muscle; a deformity so caused

Wikipedia

  1. Contracture

    In pathology, a contracture is a permanent shortening of a muscle or joint. It is usually in response to prolonged hypertonic spasticity in a concentrated muscle area, such as is seen in the tightest muscles of people with conditions like spastic cerebral palsy, but can also be due to the congenital abnormal development of muscles and connective tissue in the womb. Contractures develop when normally elastic tissues such as muscles or tendons are replaced by inelastic tissues (fibrosis). This results in the shortening and hardening of these tissues, ultimately causing rigidity, joint deformities and a total loss of movement around the joint. Most of the physical therapy, occupational therapy and other exercise regimens targeted towards people with spasticity focuses on trying to prevent contractures from happening in the first place. However, research on sustained traction of connective tissue in approaches such as adaptive yoga has demonstrated that contracture can be reduced, at the same time that tendency toward spasticity is addressed. Contractures can also be due to ischemia (restriction of blood flow) leading to the death of muscle tissue, as in Volkmann's contracture. They can also be caused by excessive myofibroblast and matrix metalloproteinase accumulation in wound margins following injury.

ChatGPT

  1. contracture

    A contracture is a medical condition that involves the permanent tightening or shortening of muscles, tendons, ligaments, or skin, causing a loss of mobility and flexibility in the affected area. This often leads to permanent deformity and rigidity of joints. It is usually a result of muscle atrophy, nerve damage, or long-term immobility.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Contracturenoun

    a state of permanent rigidity or contraction of the muscles, generally of the flexor muscles

  2. Etymology: [L. contractura a drawing together.]

Wikidata

  1. Contracture

    A muscle contracture is a permanent shortening of a muscle or joint. It is usually in response to prolonged hypertonic spasticity in a concentrated muscle area, such as is seen in the tightest muscles of people with conditions like spastic cerebral palsy. Contractures are essentially muscles or tendons that have remained too tight for too long, thus becoming shorter. Once they occur they cannot be stretched or exercised away; they must be released with orthopedic surgery. Most of the physical therapy, occupational therapy, and other exercise regimens targeted towards people with spasticity focuses on trying to prevent contractures from happening in the first place. Contractures can also be due to ischemia, as in Volkmann's contracture. Excessive matrix metalloproteinase and myofibroblast accumulation in the wound margins can result in contracture.

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Contracture

    Prolonged shortening of the muscle or other soft tissue around a joint, preventing movement of the joint.

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of contracture in Chaldean Numerology is: 6

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of contracture in Pythagorean Numerology is: 3

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"contracture." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 19 Apr. 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/contracture>.

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