What does conjugate mean?

Definitions for conjugate
ˈkɒn dʒəˌgeɪt; ˈkɒn dʒə gɪt, -ˌgeɪtcon·ju·gate

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word conjugate.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. conjugate solution, conjugateadjective

    a mixture of two partially miscible liquids A and B produces two conjugate solutions: one of A in B and another of B in A

  2. conjugate, conjugated, coupledadjective

    joined together especially in a pair or pairs

  3. conjugateadjective

    (of a pinnate leaflet) having only one pair of leaflets

  4. conjugate, conjugatedadjective

    formed by the union of two compounds

    "a conjugated protein"

  5. conjugate, conjugatedverb

    of an organic compound; containing two or more double bonds each separated from the other by a single bond

  6. conjugateverb

    unite chemically so that the product is easily broken down into the original compounds

  7. conjugateverb

    add inflections showing person, number, gender, tense, aspect, etc.

    "conjugate the verb"

  8. conjugateverb

    undergo conjugation

Wiktionary

  1. conjugatenoun

    Any entity formed by joining two or more smaller entities together.

  2. conjugatenoun

    (of a complex number) A complex conjugate.

  3. conjugatenoun

    More generally, any of a set of irrational or complex numbers that are zeros of the same polynomial with integral coefficients.

  4. conjugatenoun

    An explementary angle.

  5. conjugateverb

    To inflect (a verb) for each person, in order, for one or more tenses.

    In English, the verb 'to be' is conjugated as follows: 'I am', 'you are' (or 'thou art'), 'he/she/it is', 'we are', 'you are', 'they are'.

  6. conjugateverb

    To join together, unite; to juxtapose.

  7. conjugateverb

    To reproduce sexually as do some bacteria and algae, by exchanging or transferring DNA.

  8. Etymology: From the participle stem of conjugare, from con- + jugare.

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. Conjugatenoun

    Agreeing in derivation with another word, and therefore generally resembling in signification.

    Etymology: conjugatus, Latin.

    His grammatical argument, grounded upon the derivation of spontaneous from sponte, weighs nothing: we have learned in logick, that conjugates are sometimes in name only, and not in deed. John Bramhall, Answer to Hobbs.

  2. To Conjugateverb

    Etymology: conjugo, Latin.

    Those drawing as well marriage as wardship, gave him both power and occasion to conjugate at pleasure the Norman and the Saxon houses. Henry Wotton.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Conjugateadjective

    united in pairs; yoked together; coupled

  2. Conjugateadjective

    in single pairs; coupled

  3. Conjugateadjective

    containing two or more radicals supposed to act the part of a single one

  4. Conjugateadjective

    agreeing in derivation and radical signification; -- said of words

  5. Conjugateadjective

    presenting themselves simultaneously and having reciprocal properties; -- frequently used in pure and applied mathematics with reference to two quantities, points, lines, axes, curves, etc

  6. Conjugatenoun

    a word agreeing in derivation with another word, and therefore generally resembling it in signification

  7. Conjugatenoun

    a complex radical supposed to act the part of a single radical

  8. Conjugateverb

    to unite in marriage; to join

  9. Conjugateverb

    to inflect (a verb), or give in order the forms which it assumed in its several voices, moods, tenses, numbers, and persons

  10. Conjugateverb

    to unite in a kind of sexual union, as two or more cells or individuals among the more simple plants and animals

  11. Etymology: [L. conjugatus, p. p. or conjugare to unite; con- + jugare to join, yoke, marry, jugum yoke; akin to jungere to join. See Join.]

Freebase

  1. Conjugate

    In algebra, a conjugate is a binomial formed by negating the second term of a binomial. The conjugate of x + y is x − y, where x and y are real numbers. If y is imaginary, the process is termed complex conjugation: the complex conjugate of a + bi is a − bi, where a and b are real.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Conjugate

    kon′joo-gāt, v.t. (gram.) to give the various inflections or parts of a verb.—adj. joined: connected.—n. a word agreeing in derivation with another word.—adjs. Con′jugated, Conjugā′tional, Con′jugative, conjugate.—ns. Con′jugateness; Con′jugating; Conjugā′tion, the act of joining: union: (gram.) a term applied to a connected view or statement of the inflectional changes of form that a verb undergoes in its various relations: a class of verbs inflected in the same manner.—Conjugate axes, two axes in a conic section, such that each is parallel to the tangent at the extremity of the other; Conjugate foci (see Focus); Conjugate mirrors, two mirrors set face to face so that the rays emitted from the focus of one are first reflected from it to the and thence to its focus; Conjugation of cells, a mode of reproduction in which two apparently similar cells unite, as in Amœba, Diatoms, &c. [L. conjugāre, -ātumcon, together, and jugārejugum, a yoke.]

Entomology

  1. Conjugate

    to bring together in pairs: consisting of a single pair. Conjugation: the union of pairs; usually applied to the merging of the male and female elements.

How to pronounce conjugate?

How to say conjugate in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of conjugate in Chaldean Numerology is: 8

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of conjugate in Pythagorean Numerology is: 6

Examples of conjugate in a Sentence

  1. Charles de LEUSSE:

    People conjugate to the present; politics to other tenses. (Peuple conjugue au présent; - Politique aux autres temps.)

Popularity rank by frequency of use

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Translations for conjugate

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