What does concrete mean?

Definitions for concrete
ˈkɒn krit, ˈkɒŋ-, kɒnˈkrit, kɒŋ-con·crete

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word concrete.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. concrete(adj)

    a strong hard building material composed of sand and gravel and cement and water

  2. concrete(adj)

    capable of being perceived by the senses; not abstract or imaginary

    "concrete objects such as trees"

  3. concrete(verb)

    formed by the coalescence of particles

  4. concrete(verb)

    cover with cement

    "concrete the walls"

  5. concrete(verb)

    form into a solid mass; coalesce

Wiktionary

  1. concrete(Noun)

    A building material created by mixing Portland cement, water, and aggregate including gravel and sand.

    The road was made of concrete that had been poured in large slabs.

    Etymology: From concretus, past participle of concrescere (com- + crescere).

  2. concrete(Noun)

    A solid mass formed by the coalescence of separate particles.

    Etymology: From concretus, past participle of concrescere (com- + crescere).

  3. concrete(Noun)

    A dessert of frozen custard with various toppings.

    Etymology: From concretus, past participle of concrescere (com- + crescere).

  4. concrete(Verb)

    To cover with or encase in concrete; often constructed as concrete over.

    I hate grass, so I concreted over my lawn.

    Etymology: From concretus, past participle of concrescere (com- + crescere).

  5. concrete(Verb)

    To solidify.

    Josie's plans began concreting once she fixed a date for the wedding.

    Etymology: From concretus, past participle of concrescere (com- + crescere).

  6. concrete(Adjective)

    Particular, perceivable, real.

    Fuzzy videotapes and distorted sound recordings are not concrete evidence that bigfoot exists.

    Etymology: From concretus, past participle of concrescere (com- + crescere).

  7. concrete(Adjective)

    Not abstract.

    Once arrested, I realized that handcuffs are concrete, even if my concept of what is legal wasn't.

    Etymology: From concretus, past participle of concrescere (com- + crescere).

  8. concrete(Adjective)

    Made of concrete building material.

    The office building had concrete flower boxes out front.

    Etymology: From concretus, past participle of concrescere (com- + crescere).

Webster Dictionary

  1. Concrete(adj)

    united in growth; hence, formed by coalition of separate particles into one mass; united in a solid form

    Etymology: [L. concretus, p. p. of concrescere to grow together; con- + crescere to grow; cf. F. concret. See Crescent.]

  2. Concrete(adj)

    standing for an object as it exists in nature, invested with all its qualities, as distinguished from standing for an attribute of an object; -- opposed to abstract

    Etymology: [L. concretus, p. p. of concrescere to grow together; con- + crescere to grow; cf. F. concret. See Crescent.]

  3. Concrete(adj)

    applied to a specific object; special; particular; -- opposed to general. See Abstract, 3

    Etymology: [L. concretus, p. p. of concrescere to grow together; con- + crescere to grow; cf. F. concret. See Crescent.]

  4. Concrete(noun)

    a compound or mass formed by concretion, spontaneous union, or coalescence of separate particles of matter in one body

    Etymology: [L. concretus, p. p. of concrescere to grow together; con- + crescere to grow; cf. F. concret. See Crescent.]

  5. Concrete(noun)

    a mixture of gravel, pebbles, or broken stone with cement or with tar, etc., used for sidewalks, roadways, foundations, etc., and esp. for submarine structures

    Etymology: [L. concretus, p. p. of concrescere to grow together; con- + crescere to grow; cf. F. concret. See Crescent.]

  6. Concrete(noun)

    a term designating both a quality and the subject in which it exists; a concrete term

    Etymology: [L. concretus, p. p. of concrescere to grow together; con- + crescere to grow; cf. F. concret. See Crescent.]

  7. Concrete(noun)

    sugar boiled down from cane juice to a solid mass

    Etymology: [L. concretus, p. p. of concrescere to grow together; con- + crescere to grow; cf. F. concret. See Crescent.]

  8. Concrete(verb)

    to unite or coalesce, as separate particles, into a mass or solid body

    Etymology: [L. concretus, p. p. of concrescere to grow together; con- + crescere to grow; cf. F. concret. See Crescent.]

  9. Concrete(verb)

    to form into a mass, as by the cohesion or coalescence of separate particles

    Etymology: [L. concretus, p. p. of concrescere to grow together; con- + crescere to grow; cf. F. concret. See Crescent.]

  10. Concrete(verb)

    to cover with, or form of, concrete, as a pavement

    Etymology: [L. concretus, p. p. of concrescere to grow together; con- + crescere to grow; cf. F. concret. See Crescent.]

Freebase

  1. Concrete

    Concrete is a composite material composed of coarse granular material embedded in a hard matrix of material that fills the space among the aggregate particles and glues them together. Concrete is widely used for making architectural structures, foundations, brick/block walls, pavements, bridges/overpasses, motorways/roads, runways, parking structures, dams, pools/reservoirs, pipes, footings for gates, fences and poles and even boats. Famous concrete structures include the Burj Khalifa, Hoover Dam, the Panama Canal and the Roman Pantheon. Concrete technology was known by the Ancient Romans and was widely used within the Roman Empire—the Colosseum is largely built of concrete and the concrete dome of the Pantheon is the world's largest. After the Empire passed, use of concrete became scarce until the technology was re-pioneered in the mid-18th century.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Concrete

    kon′krēt, adj. formed into one mass: the opposite of abstract, and denoting a particular thing: made of concrete.—n. a mass formed by parts growing or sticking together: a mixture of lime, sand, pebbles, &c., used in building.—v.t. Concrēte′, to form into a solid mass.—v.i. to harden.—adv. Concrēte′ly.—ns. Concrēte′ness; Concrē′tion, a mass concreted: a growth forming in certain parts of the body, as calculi, &c.—adjs. Concrē′tionary; Concrēt′ive, having power to concrete. [L. concretuscon, together, crescĕre, cretum, to grow.]

Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

  1. concrete

    A coarse building mortar, containing broken stone, gravel, etc., used much in fortifications.

Editors Contribution

  1. Concrete

    A type of product and material.

    Concrete is used for every building.

    Submitted by MaryC on February 26, 2020  

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'concrete' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #4813

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'concrete' in Written Corpus Frequency: #3544

  3. Adjectives Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'concrete' in Adjectives Frequency: #671

How to pronounce concrete?

  1. Alex
    US English
    Daniel
    British
    Karen
    Australian
    Veena
    Indian

How to say concrete in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of concrete in Chaldean Numerology is: 7

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of concrete in Pythagorean Numerology is: 2

Examples of concrete in a Sentence

  1. Shunichi Miyanaga:

    We will no doubt be consulted (by Areva). Because of our long relationship and, if cooperation is sought, we would consider it seriously, it is something that the French government must decide and there are no concrete talks yet. If they seek (investment), we would appreciate it.

  2. Natalie Jo Eaton:

    I thought someone had hit me in the head with a baseball bat, i turned my neck just to see what was, what was getting my shirt wet. And as I looked, the metal in the back scraped the concrete, and that's when I knew there was something in my neck.

  3. President Michelle Bachelet:

    This is a concrete step in the drive to end the difference between homosexual and heterosexual couples.

  4. Salvador Dalí:

    We are all hungry and thirsty for concrete images. Abstract art will have been good for one thing: to restore its exact virginity to figurative art.

  5. Andrew Olvera:

    Andrew Olvera, an urban search and rescue member with the U.S. Agency for International Development's Disaster Assistance Response Team, said shortly before the boy was freed. Twisted ropes of steel reinforcing rods were all that stopped huge concrete slabs from falling onto the scene. Two concrete floors hung down in front of the building like curtains. The whole operation is dangerous, but it's risk versus gain. To save a human life, we'll risk almost anything.

Images & Illustrations of concrete

  1. concreteconcreteconcreteconcreteconcrete

Popularity rank by frequency of use

concrete#1#3834#10000

Translations for concrete

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

  • خَرَسَانَةArabic
  • бетонBelarusian
  • конкретизирам се, конкретен, бетонен, реален, бетон, определен, бетонирам, действителенBulgarian
  • concret, formigóCatalan, Valencian
  • beton, betonovýCzech
  • konkret, konkretisere, fast, beton, blive konkret, en, masse, blive hård, til, størkne, gøreDanish
  • Beton, betonieren, bestimmt, konkret, einbetonieren, konkretisieren, genauGerman
  • επικαλύπτω με σκυρόδεμα, στερεοποιούμαι, τσιμεντένιος, συγκεκριμένος, υλικός, σκυρόδεμαGreek
  • betono, palpebla, reala, betona, konkretaEsperanto
  • hormigonar, concreto, específico, concretizar, hormigónSpanish
  • betoon, konkreetneEstonian
  • بتنPersian
  • betonoida, konkretisoitua, betoni, kouriintuntuva, konkreettinen, betoninenFinnish
  • betongFaroese
  • béton, concret, bétonner, concrétiserFrench
  • coincréitIrish
  • cruadhtan, rudailScottish Gaelic
  • konkrét, megszilárdít, beton, betonozHungarian
  • բետոնArmenian
  • betonIndonesian
  • steinsteypa, steypaIcelandic
  • cemento, calcestruzzo, reale, concreto, cementificare, coprire, solidificare, concretizzare, concretizzarsi, ricoprire, solidificarsi, diItalian
  • コンクリート, 具体的, 実際Japanese
  • betonKalaallisut, Greenlandic
  • 콘크리트Korean
  • BëtongLuxembourgish, Letzeburgesch
  • betons, konkrēts, konkrēta, betonaLatvian
  • betongNorwegian
  • vorm, concreet, worden, beton, aannemen, betonneren, concretiseren, betonnenDutch
  • betongNorwegian Nynorsk
  • beton, betonować, konkretny, betonowyPolish
  • concreto, betãoPortuguese
  • concret, betonRomanian
  • твердеть, реальный, определённый, бетонировать, бетонный, бетон, действительный, конкретныйRussian
  • бетон, betonSerbo-Croatian
  • betónSlovak
  • betonSlovene
  • betong, konkret, ta form, påtagligSwedish
  • కాంక్రీటుTelugu
  • dongu, betonTurkish
  • бетонUkrainian
  • bê tôngVietnamese
  • 具體Chinese

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