What does chronicle mean?

Definitions for chronicle
ˈkrɒn ɪ kəlchron·i·cle

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word chronicle.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. history, account, chronicle, storyverb

    a record or narrative description of past events

    "a history of France"; "he gave an inaccurate account of the plot to kill the president"; "the story of exposure to lead"

  2. chronicleverb

    record in chronological order; make a historical record

Wiktionary

  1. chroniclenoun

    A written account of events and when they happened, ordered by time.

  2. chronicleverb

    To record in or as in a chronicle.

  3. Etymology: chronica, from χρονικός, from χρόνος

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. CHRONICLEnoun

    Etymology: chronique, Fr. from χρόνος, time.

    No more yet of this;
    For ’tis a chronicle of day by day,
    Not a relation for a breakfast. William Shakespeare, Tempest.

    You lean too confidently on those Irish chronicles, which are most fabulous and forged. Edmund Spenser, on Ireland.

    If from the field I should return once more,
    I and my sword will earn my chronicle. William Shakespeare, Ant. and Cleop.

    I’m traduc’d by tongues, which neither knows
    My faculties nor person, yet will be
    The chronicles of my doing. William Shakespeare, Henry VIII.

    I give up to historians the generals and heroes which crowd their annals, together with those which you are to produce for the British chronicle. Dryden.

  2. To Chronicleverb

    Etymology: from the noun.

    This to rehearse, should rather be to chronicle times than to search into reformation of abuses in that realm. Edmund Spenser, Irel.

    For now the devil, that told me I did well,
    Says that this deed is chronicled in hell. William Shakespeare, Rich. III.

    Love is your master; for he masters you:
    And he that is so yoked by a fool,
    Methinks, should not be chronicled for wise. William Shakespeare.

    I shall be the jest of the town; nay, in two days I expect to be chronicled in ditty, and sung in woful ballad. William Congreve, Old Bat.

Wikipedia

  1. Chronicle

    A chronicle (Latin: chronica, from Greek χρονικά chroniká, from χρόνος, chrónos – "time") is a historical account of events arranged in chronological order, as in a timeline. Typically, equal weight is given for historically important events and local events, the purpose being the recording of events that occurred, seen from the perspective of the chronicler. A chronicle which traces world history is a universal chronicle. This is in contrast to a narrative or history, in which an author chooses events to interpret and analyze and excludes those the author does not consider important or relevant. The information sources for chronicles vary. Some are written from the chronicler's direct knowledge, others from witnesses or participants in events, still others are accounts passed down from generation to generation by oral tradition. Some used written material, such as charters, letters, and earlier chronicles. Still others are tales of unknown origin that have mythical status. Copyists also changed chronicles in creative copying, making corrections or in updating or continuing a chronicle with information not available to the original chronicler. Determining the reliability of particular chronicles is important to historians.Many newspapers and other periodical literature have adopted "chronicle" as part of their name. Various fictional stories have also adopted "chronicle" as part of their title, to give an impression of epic proportion to their stories.

ChatGPT

  1. chronicle

    A chronicle is typically a factual written account of significant or historical events in the order of their occurrence. It can also refer to a detailed record or narrative description of past events.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Chroniclenoun

    an historical register or account of facts or events disposed in the order of time

  2. Chroniclenoun

    a narrative of events; a history; a record

  3. Chroniclenoun

    the two canonical books of the Old Testament in which immediately follow 2 Kings

  4. Chronicleverb

    to record in a history or chronicle; to record; to register

Wikidata

  1. Chronicle

    Generally a chronicle is a historical account of facts and events ranged in chronological order, as in a time line. Typically, equal weight is given for historically important events and local events, the purpose being the recording of events that occurred, seen from the perspective of the chronicler. This is in contrast to a narrative or history, which sets selected events in a meaningful interpretive context and excludes those the author does not see as important. Where a chronicler obtained the information varies; some chronicles are written from first-hand knowledge, some are from witnesses or participants in events, still others are accounts passed mouth to mouth prior to being written down. Some made use of written materials; charters, letters, or the works of earlier chroniclers. Still others are tales of such unknown origins so as to hold mythical status. Copyists also affected chronicles in creative copying, making corrections or in updating or continuing a chronicle with information not available to the original author. The reliability of a particular chronicle is an important determination for modern historians.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Chronicle

    kron′i-kl, n. a bare record of events in order of time: a history: (pl.) name of two of the Old Testament books: a story, account.—v.t. to record.—n. Chron′icler, a historian. [O. Fr. chronique—L.—Gr. chronika, annals—chronos, time.]

Matched Categories

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of chronicle in Chaldean Numerology is: 7

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of chronicle in Pythagorean Numerology is: 6

Examples of chronicle in a Sentence

  1. Jim Steinle:

    A day later, he reiterated his campaign promise to build a wall along the U.S. / Mexico border. In 2015, prior to when Kate’s law was passed by the U.S. House of representatives, Trump tweeted that he supported the law. In another tweet, he criticized former President Barack Obama for not calling Steinle’s family. Jim Steinle told the San Francisco Chronicle the family was saddened and shocked by the verdict. There's no other way you can coin it. Justice was rendered, but it was not served.

  2. Letitia Elizabeth Landon:

    The history of most fictions would be far stranger than the fictions themselves ; but it would be a dark and sad chronicle.

  3. Ritika:

    It's better to let the past be buried in the past itself,because if not so it hinders the working of the present and future.Those dreams which didn't turn true before was because there's some better dream yet to come into light.So never long for those memories to be alive again,let them remain memories itself because you never know that your life's chronicle still holds your most beautiful and the best dream ever which it's going to reveal later.

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Translations for chronicle

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"chronicle." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 4 Mar. 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/chronicle>.

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