What does chord mean?

Definitions for chord
kɔrdchord

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word chord.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. chord(noun)

    a straight line connecting two points on a curve

  2. chord(verb)

    a combination of three or more notes that blend harmoniously when sounded together

  3. chord(verb)

    play chords on (a string instrument)

  4. harmonize, harmonise, chord(verb)

    bring into consonance, harmony, or accord while making music or singing

Wiktionary

  1. chord(Noun)

    In music, a combination of any three or more notes sounded simultaneously.

    Etymology: From Latin chorda, from (Doric) χορδά, (Ionic) χορδή

  2. chord(Noun)

    A straight line between two points of a curve.

    Etymology: From Latin chorda, from (Doric) χορδά, (Ionic) χορδή

  3. chord(Noun)

    A horizontal member of a truss.

    Etymology: From Latin chorda, from (Doric) χορδά, (Ionic) χορδή

  4. chord(Noun)

    The distance between the leading and trailing edge of a wing, measured in the direction of the normal airflow.

    Etymology: From Latin chorda, from (Doric) χορδά, (Ionic) χορδή

  5. chord(Noun)

    A keyboard shortcut that involves two or more distinct keypresses, such as Ctrl+M followed by P.

    Etymology: From Latin chorda, from (Doric) χορδά, (Ionic) χορδή

  6. chord(Verb)

    To write chords for.

    Etymology: From Latin chorda, from (Doric) χορδά, (Ionic) χορδή

  7. chord(Verb)

    To accord; to harmonize together.

    This note chords with that one.

    Etymology: From Latin chorda, from (Doric) χορδά, (Ionic) χορδή

Webster Dictionary

  1. Chord(noun)

    the string of a musical instrument

    Etymology: [L chorda a gut, a string made of a gut, Gr. chordh`. In the sense of a string or small rope, in general, it is written cord. See Cord.]

  2. Chord(noun)

    a combination of tones simultaneously performed, producing more or less perfect harmony, as, the common chord

    Etymology: [L chorda a gut, a string made of a gut, Gr. chordh`. In the sense of a string or small rope, in general, it is written cord. See Cord.]

  3. Chord(noun)

    a right line uniting the extremities of the arc of a circle or curve

    Etymology: [L chorda a gut, a string made of a gut, Gr. chordh`. In the sense of a string or small rope, in general, it is written cord. See Cord.]

  4. Chord(noun)

    a cord. See Cord, n., 4

    Etymology: [L chorda a gut, a string made of a gut, Gr. chordh`. In the sense of a string or small rope, in general, it is written cord. See Cord.]

  5. Chord(noun)

    the upper or lower part of a truss, usually horizontal, resisting compression or tension

    Etymology: [L chorda a gut, a string made of a gut, Gr. chordh`. In the sense of a string or small rope, in general, it is written cord. See Cord.]

  6. Chord(verb)

    to provide with musical chords or strings; to string; to tune

    Etymology: [L chorda a gut, a string made of a gut, Gr. chordh`. In the sense of a string or small rope, in general, it is written cord. See Cord.]

  7. Chord(verb)

    to accord; to harmonize together; as, this note chords with that

    Etymology: [L chorda a gut, a string made of a gut, Gr. chordh`. In the sense of a string or small rope, in general, it is written cord. See Cord.]

Freebase

  1. Chord

    A chord in music is any harmonic set of three or more notes that is heard as if sounding simultaneously. These need not actually be played together: arpeggios and broken chords may for many practical and theoretical purposes be understood as chords. Chords and sequences of chords are frequently used in modern Western, West African and Oceanian music, whereas they are absent from the music of many other parts of the world. The most frequently encountered chords are triads, so called because they consist of three distinct notes: further notes may be added to give seventh chords, extended chords, or added tone chords. The most common chords are the major and minor triads and then the augmented and diminished triads. The descriptions "major", "minor", "augmented" and "diminished" are sometimes referred to collectively as chordal "quality". Chords are also commonly classed by their root note so, for instance, the chord C Major may be described as a triad of major quality built upon the note C. Chords may also be classified by inversion, the order in which their notes are stacked. However, since the structural meaning of a chord depends exclusively upon the degree of the scale on which it is built, chords are usually analysed by numbering them, using Roman numerals, upwards from the key-note. Common ways of notating or representing chords in western music other than conventional staff notation include Roman numerals, figured bass, macro symbols, and various systems of symbols and notations such as are typically found in the lead sheets, fake books and chord charts used in popular music to lay out the harmonic groundplan of a piece so that the musician may improvise, "jam", "vamp", "busk" or "head arrange" a part.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Chord

    kord, n. (mus.) the simultaneous and harmonious union of sounds of a different pitch.—The Common chord is a note with its third and perfect fifth reckoned upwards. [Formed from Accord.]

  2. Chord

    kord, n. the string of a musical instrument: (fig.) of the emotions: (geom.) a straight line joining the extremities of an arc: a straight line joining any two points in the curve of a circle, ellipse, &c. [L. chorda—Gr. chordē, an intestine.]

Dictionary of Nautical Terms

  1. chord

    In geometry, is a line which joins the extremities of any arc of a circle.

British National Corpus

  1. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'chord' in Nouns Frequency: #2991

How to pronounce chord?

  1. Alex
    Alex
    US English
    Daniel
    Daniel
    British
    Karen
    Karen
    Australian
    Veena
    Veena
    Indian

How to say chord in sign language?

  1. chord

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of chord in Chaldean Numerology is: 3

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of chord in Pythagorean Numerology is: 3

Examples of chord in a Sentence

  1. Chris Kermode:

    It has struck a chord with fans worldwide in a very short time, this event has great potential to reach new fans around the world,.

  2. Peter Faiman:

    I don’t think there’s any plans from (producer) John Cornell or from Paul (Hogan) to make another one but who knows, somebody else might come along and do it, it’s a matter of striking a chord, and that movie came along at just the right time. It was shot in the right place and had a great character, and a great team of people putting it together in a really timely fashion.

  3. Niclas Catani:

    It looks like a product that could strike a chord with the big trend of ecological consumption. In the western world, innovations in this sphere have a good chance of succeeding, it will hardly bring a revolution overnight but the start-up can nevertheless make good money out of it.

  4. Donald Trump:

    Well, we've hit a chord. And we're not as different as people think, you know we have a very good relationship. We're not as different as people think. But there is certainly a different style. You know, I have great assets and he has some great assets. But we are both resonating, there's no question about it.

  5. Micheal Martin:

    We can become the lead party in the aftermath of this election. ... This isn't a coronation for Enda Kenny. Our message has struck a chord with the people.

Images & Illustrations of chord

  1. chordchordchordchordchord

Popularity rank by frequency of use

chord#10000#13523#100000

Translations for chord

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

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