What does cerebellum mean?

Definitions for cerebellum
ˌsɛr əˈbɛl əm; -ˈbɛl əcere·bel·lum

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word cerebellum.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. cerebellumnoun

    a major division of the vertebrate brain; situated above the medulla oblongata and beneath the cerebrum in humans

Wiktionary

  1. cerebellumnoun

    Part of the hindbrain in vertebrates. In humans it lies between the brainstem and the cerebrum. It plays an important role in sensory perception, motor output, balance and posture.

Wikipedia

  1. Cerebellum

    The cerebellum (Latin for "little brain") is a major feature of the hindbrain of all vertebrates. Although usually smaller than the cerebrum, in some animals such as the mormyrid fishes it may be as large as or even larger. In humans, the cerebellum plays an important role in motor control. It may also be involved in some cognitive functions such as attention and language as well as emotional control such as regulating fear and pleasure responses, but its movement-related functions are the most solidly established. The human cerebellum does not initiate movement, but contributes to coordination, precision, and accurate timing: it receives input from sensory systems of the spinal cord and from other parts of the brain, and integrates these inputs to fine-tune motor activity. Cerebellar damage produces disorders in fine movement, equilibrium, posture, and motor learning in humans.Anatomically, the human cerebellum has the appearance of a separate structure attached to the bottom of the brain, tucked underneath the cerebral hemispheres. Its cortical surface is covered with finely spaced parallel grooves, in striking contrast to the broad irregular convolutions of the cerebral cortex. These parallel grooves conceal the fact that the cerebellar cortex is actually a continuous thin layer of tissue tightly folded in the style of an accordion. Within this thin layer are several types of neurons with a highly regular arrangement, the most important being Purkinje cells and granule cells. This complex neural organization gives rise to a massive signal-processing capability, but almost all of the output from the cerebellar cortex passes through a set of small deep nuclei lying in the white matter interior of the cerebellum.In addition to its direct role in motor control, the cerebellum is necessary for several types of motor learning, most notably learning to adjust to changes in sensorimotor relationships. Several theoretical models have been developed to explain sensorimotor calibration in terms of synaptic plasticity within the cerebellum. These models derive from those formulated by David Marr and James Albus, based on the observation that each cerebellar Purkinje cell receives two dramatically different types of input: one comprises thousands of weak inputs from the parallel fibers of the granule cells; the other is an extremely strong input from a single climbing fiber. The basic concept of the Marr–Albus theory is that the climbing fiber serves as a "teaching signal", which induces a long-lasting change in the strength of parallel fiber inputs. Observations of long-term depression in parallel fiber inputs have provided some support for theories of this type, but their validity remains controversial.

ChatGPT

  1. cerebellum

    The cerebellum is a part of the brain located at the back of the skull. It plays a vital role in controlling motor movement, coordination, balance and spatial awareness. It also contributes to functions such as attention and language processing. Its structure includes two hemispheres and a centrally located area called the vermis.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Cerebellumnoun

    the large lobe of the hind brain in front of and above the medulla; the little brain. It controls combined muscular action. See Brain

  2. Etymology: [L., dim. of cerebrum brain.]

Wikidata

  1. Cerebellum

    The cerebellum is a region of the brain that plays an important role in motor control. It may also be involved in some cognitive functions such as attention and language, and in regulating fear and pleasure responses, but its movement-related functions are the most solidly established. The cerebellum does not initiate movement, but it contributes to coordination, precision, and accurate timing. It receives input from sensory systems of the spinal cord and from other parts of the brain, and integrates these inputs to fine tune motor activity. Because of this fine-tuning function, damage to the cerebellum does not cause paralysis, but instead produces disorders in fine movement, equilibrium, posture, and motor learning. In its anatomy, the cerebellum has the appearance of a separate structure attached to the bottom of the brain, tucked underneath the cerebral hemispheres. The surface of the cerebellum is covered with finely spaced parallel grooves, in striking contrast to the broad irregular convolutions of the cerebral cortex. These parallel grooves conceal the fact that the cerebellum is actually a continuous thin layer of tissue, tightly folded in the style of an accordion. Within this thin layer are several types of neurons with a highly regular arrangement, the most important being Purkinje cells and granule cells. This complex neural network gives rise to a massive signal-processing capability, but almost all of its output is directed to a set of small deep cerebellar nuclei lying in the interior of the cerebellum.

The Roycroft Dictionary

  1. cerebellum

    1. The knapsack of Intelligence. 2. The _pons asinorum_ between the mind and the cabeza. 3. A place whence, in democracies, politicians draw their strength, and in monarchies where the masses manufacture bombs and guillotines. _E. g._, "Now suppose," began Professor Sapnoodle, "that a tiny elevator ran up the spine; we should then call the cerebellum the ceiling of the basement."

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Cerebellum

    The part of brain that lies behind the BRAIN STEM in the posterior base of skull (CRANIAL FOSSA, POSTERIOR). It is also known as the "little brain" with convolutions similar to those of CEREBRAL CORTEX, inner white matter, and deep cerebellar nuclei. Its function is to coordinate voluntary movements, maintain balance, and learn motor skills.

Editors Contribution

  1. cerebellum

    A element of the brain.

    The cerebellum plays a role in movement, balance and posture.


    Submitted by MaryC on February 24, 2020  

Entomology

  1. Cerebellum

    has been applied to the sub-esophageal ganglion.

Matched Categories

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of cerebellum in Chaldean Numerology is: 2

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of cerebellum in Pythagorean Numerology is: 6

Examples of cerebellum in a Sentence

  1. Andrew Schneider:

    Hey, what do you think drives all this grey matter up here Electricity. It's brain waves surfing on synaptic junctions. If your radio can go out because of sun spots, why can't your cerebellum It's all a matter of reception and it seems to me these signals are going to get crossed somehow. It's all logical.

  2. David Cook:

    This pattern of brain cell loss in the cerebellum exactly matched what had been reported earlier in the brains of retired former boxers.

  3. Sorel Vorster:

    The first step is to make sure the permeation of the cerebellum tissue is connected to the symptoms that the patient is experiencing because sometimes people have this exact same permeation with no symptoms at all.

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Translations for cerebellum

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"cerebellum." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 3 Mar. 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/cerebellum>.

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