What does cerastes mean?

Definitions for cerastes
səˈræs tizcerastes

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word cerastes.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. horned viper, cerastes, sand viper, horned asp, Cerastes cornutusnoun

    highly venomous viper of northern Africa and southwestern Asia having a horny spine above each eye

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. CERASTESnoun

    A serpent having horns, or supposed to have them.

    Etymology: ϰεϱαστὴς.

    Scorpion, and asp, and amphisbena dire,
    Cerastes horn’d, hydrus, and elops drear. Par. Lost, b. x.

Wikipedia

  1. Cerastes

    The cerastes (Greek: κεράστης, transliteration: kerastēs, meaning "having horns") is a creature of Greek legend, a serpent that is incredibly flexible—so much so that it is said to have no spine. Cerastae can have either two large ram-like horns or two pairs of smaller horns. The cerastes hides its head in the sand with only the horns protruding out of the surface; this is meant to deceive other animals into thinking it is food. When the animal approaches the cerastes, the cerastes promptly kills it.The legend is most likely derived from the habits of the horned viper, whose genus, Cerastes, is named after the mythological creature. They are desert-dwelling animals, which can have horn-like protrusions over their eyes, and are ambush predators, though not nearly large enough to take prey items much larger than a mouse or small lizard.Leonardo da Vinci wrote the following on the cerastes: This has four movable little horns; so, when it wants to feed, it hides under leaves all of its body except these little horns which, as they move, seem to the birds to be some small worms at play. Then they immediately swoop down to pick them and the Cerastes suddenly twines round them and encircles and devours them.

ChatGPT

  1. cerastes

    Cerastes refers to a genus of venomous vipers found in the deserts of Northern Africa and parts of the Middle East. They are known for their sidewinding movement and the presence of horns above their eyes. The term is often associated with the horned viper species, Cerastes cerastes and Cerastes gasperetti. The name itself is derived from the Greek word "Kerastes" which means "horned".

Webster Dictionary

  1. Cerastesnoun

    a genus of poisonous African serpents, with a horny scale over each eye; the horned viper

  2. Etymology: [L., a horned serpent, fr. Gr. kera`sths horned, fr. ke`ras horn.]

Wikidata

  1. Cerastes

    The cerastes is a creature of Greek legend, a serpent that is incredibly flexible—so much so that it is said to have no spine. Cerastae can have either two large ram-like horns or four pairs of smaller horns. The cerastes hides its head in the sand with only the horns protruding out of the surface; this is meant to deceive other animals into thinking it is food. When the animal approaches the cerastes, the cerastes promptly kills it. The legend is most likely derived from the habits of the horned viper, whose genus, Cerastes, is named after the mythological creature. They are desert-dwelling animals, which can have horn-like protrusions over their eyes, and are ambush predators, though not nearly large enough to take prey items much larger than a mouse or small lizard. Leonardo da Vinci wrote the following on Cerastes: This has four movable little horns; so, when it wants to feed, it hides under leaves all of its body except these little horns which, as they move, seem to the birds to be some small worms at play. Then they immediately swoop down to pick them and the Cerastes suddenly twines round them and encircles and devours them

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Cerastes

    se-ras′tēz, n. a genus of poisonous snakes having a horny process over each eye. [L.; Gr. kerastēskeras, a horn.]

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of cerastes in Chaldean Numerology is: 8

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of cerastes in Pythagorean Numerology is: 9

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"cerastes." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 24 Jul 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/cerastes>.

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