What does catalysis mean?

Definitions for catalysis
kəˈtæl ə sɪs; -ˌsizcata·ly·sis

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word catalysis.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. catalysis, contact actionnoun

    acceleration of a chemical reaction induced the presence of material that is chemically unchanged at the end of the reaction

    "of the top 50 commodity chemicals, 30 are created directly by catalysis and another 6 are made from raw materials that are catalytically produced"

GCIDE

  1. Catalysisnoun

    (Chem.) (a) A process by which a chemical reaction is accelerated in the presence of certain agents which were formerly believed to exert an influence by mere contact. It is now believed that such reactions are attended with the formation of an intermediate compound or compounds, so that by alternate composition and decomposition the agent is apparenty left unchanged; as, the catalysis of making ether from alcohol by means of sulphuric acid; or catalysis in the action of enzymes (as diastase, or ptyalin) on starch. (b) The catalytic force.

Wiktionary

  1. catalysisnoun

    The increase of the rate of a chemical reaction induced by a catalyst.

Wikipedia

  1. Catalysis

    Catalysis () is the process of increasing the rate of a chemical reaction by adding a substance known as a catalyst (). Catalysts are not consumed in the reaction and remain unchanged after it. If the reaction is rapid and the catalyst recycles quickly, very small amounts of catalyst often suffice; mixing, surface area, and temperature are important factors in reaction rate. Catalysts generally react with one or more reactants to form intermediates that subsequently give the final reaction product, in the process of regenerating the catalyst. Catalysis may be classified as either homogeneous, whose components are dispersed in the same phase (usually gaseous or liquid) as the reactant, or heterogeneous, whose components are not in the same phase. Enzymes and other biocatalysts are often considered as a third category. Catalysis is ubiquitous in chemical industry of all kinds. Estimates are that 90% of all commercially produced chemical products involve catalysts at some stage in the process of their manufacture. The term "catalyst" is derived from Greek καταλύειν, kataluein, meaning "loosen" or "untie". The concept of catalysis was invented by chemist Elizabeth Fulhame, based on her novel work in oxidation-reduction experiments.

ChatGPT

  1. catalysis

    Catalysis is a chemical process where a substance known as a catalyst increases the rate of a chemical reaction by reducing the energy required for the reaction to occur, without being consumed or altered itself in the reaction. The catalyst can facilitate the reaction to occur, make it more efficient, or even enable it to happen under milder conditions.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Catalysisnoun

    dissolution; degeneration; decay

  2. Catalysisnoun

    a process by which reaction occurs in the presence of certain agents which were formerly believed to exert an influence by mere contact. It is now believed that such reactions are attended with the formation of an intermediate compound or compounds, so that by alternate composition and decomposition the agent is apparenty left unchanged; as, the catalysis of making ether from alcohol by means of sulphuric acid; or catalysis in the action of soluble ferments (as diastase, or ptyalin) on starch

  3. Catalysisnoun

    the catalytic force

  4. Etymology: [ML., fr. Gr. dissolution, fr. to destroy, dissolve; kata` down, wholly + to loose.]

Wikidata

  1. Catalysis

    Catalysis is the increase in rate of a chemical reaction due to the participation of a substance called a catalyst. Unlike other reagents in the chemical reaction, a catalyst is not consumed. A catalyst may participate in multiple chemical transformations. The effect of a catalyst may vary due to the presence of other substances known as inhibitors or poisons or promoters. Catalyzed reactions have a lower activation energy than the corresponding uncatalyzed reaction, resulting in a higher reaction rate at the same temperature. However, the mechanistic explanation of catalysis is complex. Catalysts may affect the reaction environment favorably, or bind to the reagents to polarize bonds, e.g. acid catalysts for reactions of carbonyl compounds, or form specific intermediates that are not produced naturally, such as osmate esters in osmium tetroxide-catalyzed dihydroxylation of alkenes, or cause dissociation of reagents to reactive forms, such as chemisorbed hydrogen in catalytic hydrogenation. Kinetically, catalytic reactions are typical chemical reactions; i.e. the reaction rate depends on the frequency of contact of the reactants in the rate-determining step. Usually, the catalyst participates in this slowest step, and rates are limited by amount of catalyst and its "activity". In heterogeneous catalysis, the diffusion of reagents to the surface and diffusion of products from the surface can be rate determining. A nanomaterial-based catalyst is an example of a heterogeneous catalyst. Analogous events associated with substrate binding and product dissociation apply to homogeneous catalysts.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Catalysis

    ka-tal′i-sis, n. (chem.) the decomposition of a compound and the recomposition of its elements, by the presence of a substance which does not itself suffer change, as in fermentation.—adj. Catalyt′ic. [Gr. katalysiskata, down, lyein, to loosen.]

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Catalysis

    The facilitation of a chemical reaction by material (catalyst) that is not consumed by the reaction.

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of catalysis in Chaldean Numerology is: 2

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of catalysis in Pythagorean Numerology is: 1

Popularity rank by frequency of use

catalysis#10000#34055#100000

Translations for catalysis

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"catalysis." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 28 Feb. 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/catalysis>.

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