What does caddis mean?

Definitions for caddis
ˈkæd ɪscad·dis

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word caddis.


Did you actually mean caddish or cattish?

Wiktionary

  1. caddisnoun

    The larva of a caddice fly that generally live in cylindrical cases, open at each end, and covered externally with debris.

  2. caddisnoun

    A rough woolen cloth; caddice

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. Caddisnoun

    He hath ribbons of all the colours of the rainbow; inkles, caddises, cambricks, lawns; why, he sings them over as if they were gods and goddesses. William Shakespeare, Winter’s Tale.

    He especially loves the mayfly, which is bred of the cod-worm, or caddis; and these make the trout bold and lusty. Izaak Walton, Angler.

Wikipedia

  1. caddis

    The caddisflies, or order Trichoptera, are a group of insects with aquatic larvae and terrestrial adults. There are approximately 14,500 described species, most of which can be divided into the suborders Integripalpia and Annulipalpia on the basis of the adult mouthparts. Integripalpian larvae construct a portable casing to protect themselves as they move around looking for food, while Annulipalpian larvae make themselves a fixed retreat in which they remain, waiting for food to come to them. The affinities of the small third suborder Spicipalpia are unclear, and molecular analysis suggests it may not be monophyletic. Also called sedge-flies or rail-flies, the adults are small moth-like insects with two pairs of hairy membranous wings. They are closely related to the Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies) which have scales on their wings; the two orders together form the superorder Amphiesmenoptera. The aquatic larvae are found in a wide variety of habitats such as streams, rivers, lakes, ponds, spring seeps and temporary waters (vernal pools), and even the ocean. The larvae of many species use silk to make protective cases, which are often strengthened with gravel, sand, twigs, bitten-off pieces of plants, or other debris. The larvae exhibit various feeding strategies, with different species being predators, leaf shredders, algal grazers, or collectors of particles from the water column and benthos. Most adults have short lives during which they do not feed. In fly fishing, artificial flies are tied to imitate adults, while larvae and pupae are used as bait. Common and widespread genera such as Helicopsyche and Hydropsyche are important in the sport, where caddisflies are known as "sedges". Caddisflies are useful as bioindicators, as they are sensitive to water pollution and are large enough to be assessed in the field. In art, the French artist Hubert Duprat has created works by providing caddis larvae with small grains of gold and precious stones for them to build into decorative cases.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Caddisnoun

    the larva of a caddice fly. These larvae generally live in cylindrical cases, open at each end, and covered externally with pieces of broken shells, gravel, bits of wood, etc. They are a favorite bait with anglers. Called also caddice worm, or caddis worm

  2. Caddisnoun

    a kind of worsted lace or ribbon

  3. Etymology: [Prov. E. caddy, cadew; cf. G. kder bait.]

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Caddis

    kad′dis, n. (Shak.) worsted ribbon. [O. Fr. cadaz, cadas.]

How to pronounce caddis?

How to say caddis in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of caddis in Chaldean Numerology is: 7

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of caddis in Pythagorean Numerology is: 4

Popularity rank by frequency of use

caddis#10000#80555#100000

Translations for caddis

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

Get even more translations for caddis »

Translation

Find a translation for the caddis definition in other languages:

Select another language:

  • - Select -
  • 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified)
  • 繁體中文 (Chinese - Traditional)
  • Español (Spanish)
  • Esperanto (Esperanto)
  • 日本語 (Japanese)
  • Português (Portuguese)
  • Deutsch (German)
  • العربية (Arabic)
  • Français (French)
  • Русский (Russian)
  • ಕನ್ನಡ (Kannada)
  • 한국어 (Korean)
  • עברית (Hebrew)
  • Gaeilge (Irish)
  • Українська (Ukrainian)
  • اردو (Urdu)
  • Magyar (Hungarian)
  • मानक हिन्दी (Hindi)
  • Indonesia (Indonesian)
  • Italiano (Italian)
  • தமிழ் (Tamil)
  • Türkçe (Turkish)
  • తెలుగు (Telugu)
  • ภาษาไทย (Thai)
  • Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese)
  • Čeština (Czech)
  • Polski (Polish)
  • Bahasa Indonesia (Indonesian)
  • Românește (Romanian)
  • Nederlands (Dutch)
  • Ελληνικά (Greek)
  • Latinum (Latin)
  • Svenska (Swedish)
  • Dansk (Danish)
  • Suomi (Finnish)
  • فارسی (Persian)
  • ייִדיש (Yiddish)
  • հայերեն (Armenian)
  • Norsk (Norwegian)
  • English (English)

Word of the Day

Would you like us to send you a FREE new word definition delivered to your inbox daily?

Please enter your email address:


Citation

Use the citation below to add this definition to your bibliography:

Style:MLAChicagoAPA

"caddis." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 14 Apr. 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/caddis>.

Discuss these caddis definitions with the community:

0 Comments

    Are we missing a good definition for caddis? Don't keep it to yourself...

    Image or illustration of

    caddis

    Credit »

    Free, no signup required:

    Add to Chrome

    Get instant definitions for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

    Free, no signup required:

    Add to Firefox

    Get instant definitions for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

    Browse Definitions.net

    Quiz

    Are you a words master?

    »
    of surpassing excellence
    A busy
    B sought
    C hatched
    D brilliant

    Nearby & related entries:

    Alternative searches for caddis: