What does buckler mean?

Definitions for buckler
ˈbʌk lərbuck·ler

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word buckler.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. shield, bucklernoun

    armor carried on the arm to intercept blows

Wiktionary

  1. bucklernoun

    A kind of shield, of various shapes and sizes, worn on one of the arms (usually the left) for protecting the front of the body. In the sword and buckler play of the Middle Ages in England, the buckler was a small shield, used, not to cover the body, but to stop or parry blows.

  2. bucklernoun

    A shield resembling the Roman scutum. In modern usage, a smaller variety of shield is usually implied by this term.

  3. bucklernoun

    One of the large, bony, external plates found on many ganoid fishes.

  4. bucklernoun

    The anterior segment of the shell of trilobites.

  5. bucklernoun

    A block of wood or plate of iron made to fit a hawse hole, or the circular opening in a half-port, to prevent water from entering when the vessel pitches.

  6. bucklerverb

    To shield; to defend.

    Can Oxford, that did ever fence the right, / Now buckler falsehood with a pedigree? uE000122658uE001 Shakespeare.

  7. Etymology: From boucler, bucler, from *, from buccula.

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. BUCKLERnoun

    A shield; a defensive weapon buckled on the arm.

    Etymology: bwccled, Welch; bouclier, Fr.

    He took my arms, and, while I forc’d my way,
    Through troops of foes, which did our passage stay;
    My buckler o’er my aged father cast,
    Still fighting, still defending as I past. John Dryden, Aurengzebe.

    This medal compliments the emperour in the same sense as the old Romans did their dictator Fabius, when they called him the buckler of Rome. Joseph Addison, on ancient Medals.

  2. To Bucklerverb

    To support; to defend.

    Etymology: from the noun.

    Fear not, sweet wench, they shall not touch thee, Kate;
    I’ll buckler thee against a million. William Shakespeare, Tam. the Shrew.

    Can Oxford, that did ever fence the right,
    Now buckler falshood with a pedigree? William Shakespeare, Henry VI.

Wikipedia

  1. Buckler

    A buckler (French bouclier 'shield', from Old French bocle, boucle 'boss') is a small shield, up to 45 cm (up to 18 in) in diameter, gripped in the fist with a central handle behind the boss. While being used in Europe since antiquity, it became more common as a companion weapon in hand-to-hand combat during the Medieval and Renaissance periods. Its size made it poor protection against missile weapons (e.g., arrows) but useful in deflecting the blow of an opponent's weapons, binding his arms, hindering his movements, or punching him. MS I.33, considered the earliest extant armed-combat manual, (around 1300) contains an early description of a system of combat with buckler and sword.

ChatGPT

  1. buckler

    A buckler is a small, round shield that is typically gripped in the fist or worn on the forearm. Historically, it was used in hand-to-hand combat during the Middle Ages for deflecting and blocking attacks.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Bucklernoun

    a kind of shield, of various shapes and sizes, worn on one of the arms (usually the left) for protecting the front of the body

  2. Bucklernoun

    one of the large, bony, external plates found on many ganoid fishes

  3. Bucklernoun

    the anterior segment of the shell of trilobites

  4. Bucklernoun

    a block of wood or plate of iron made to fit a hawse hole, or the circular opening in a half-port, to prevent water from entering when the vessel pitches

  5. Bucklerverb

    to shield; to defend

Wikidata

  1. Buckler

    A buckler is a small shield, 15 to 45 cm in diameter, gripped in the fist; it was generally used as a companion weapon in hand-to-hand combat during the Medieval and Renaissance, as its size made it poor protection against missile weapons but useful in deflecting the blow of an opponent's sword or mace. There are two major forms of medievally documented bucklers. The first is a simple round shield with the fist positioned directly behind the boss with a variety of shapes of face and depths of rim. These could also have projections from the top and bottom as in Hans Talhoffer's Fechtbücher or serrated rings around the boss as in one example in the Wallace Collection. The second major form is a corrugated rectangle as suggested by Achille Marozzo in his Opera Nova. MS I.33, considered the earliest extant armed-combat manual, contains an early description of a system of combat with buckler and sword.

Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

  1. buckler

    A kind of shield or piece of defensive armor, anciently used in war. It was often 4 feet long, and covered the whole body.

Surnames Frequency by Census Records

  1. BUCKLER

    According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Buckler is ranked #8419 in terms of the most common surnames in America.

    The Buckler surname appeared 3,926 times in the 2010 census and if you were to sample 100,000 people in the United States, approximately 1 would have the surname Buckler.

    94.8% or 3,723 total occurrences were White.
    2.2% or 88 total occurrences were Black.
    1.4% or 58 total occurrences were of Hispanic origin.
    1% or 42 total occurrences were of two or more races.

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of buckler in Chaldean Numerology is: 5

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of buckler in Pythagorean Numerology is: 9

Popularity rank by frequency of use

buckler#10000#70634#100000

Translations for buckler

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"buckler." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 23 Jul 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/buckler>.

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