What does arsenic mean?

Definitions for arsenic
ˈɑr sə nɪk, ˈɑrs nɪk; ɑrˈsɛn ɪkar·senic

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word arsenic.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. arsenic, arsenic trioxide, arsenous anhydride, arsenous oxide, white arsenic, ratsbanenoun

    a white powdered poisonous trioxide of arsenic; used in manufacturing glass and as a pesticide (rat poison) and weed killer

  2. arsenic, As, atomic number 33noun

    a very poisonous metallic element that has three allotropic forms; arsenic and arsenic compounds are used as herbicides and insecticides and various alloys; found in arsenopyrite and orpiment and realgar

Wiktionary

  1. arsenicnoun

    A nonmetallic chemical element (symbol As) with an atomic number of 33.

  2. arsenicnoun

    Arsenic trioxide.

  3. arsenicadjective

    Of, or containing arsenic with a valence of 5.

Wikipedia

  1. Arsenic

    Arsenic is a chemical element with the symbol As and atomic number 33. Arsenic occurs in many minerals, usually in combination with sulfur and metals, but also as a pure elemental crystal. Arsenic is a metalloid. It has various allotropes, but only the gray form, which has a metallic appearance, is important to industry. The primary use of arsenic is in alloys of lead (for example, in car batteries and ammunition). Arsenic is a common n-type dopant in semiconductor electronic devices. It is also a component of the III-V compound semiconductor gallium arsenide. Arsenic and its compounds, especially the trioxide, are used in the production of pesticides, treated wood products, herbicides, and insecticides. These applications are declining with the increasing recognition of the toxicity of arsenic and its compounds.A few species of bacteria are able to use arsenic compounds as respiratory metabolites. Trace quantities of arsenic are an essential dietary element in rats, hamsters, goats, chickens, and presumably other species. A role in human metabolism is not known. However, arsenic poisoning occurs in multicellular life if quantities are larger than needed. Arsenic contamination of groundwater is a problem that affects millions of people across the world. The United States' Environmental Protection Agency states that all forms of arsenic are a serious risk to human health. The United States' Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry ranked arsenic as number 1 in its 2001 Priority List of Hazardous Substances at Superfund sites. Arsenic is classified as a Group-A carcinogen.

ChatGPT

  1. arsenic

    Arsenic is a chemical element with the symbol As and atomic number 33. It is known as a metalloid, meaning it has properties of both metals and nonmetals, typically appearing as a grey solid substance. It is naturally occurring and commonly used in industrial processes, especially in the manufacturing of certain types of glass, some electronics, and some types of pharmaceuticals. Inhalation, ingestion, or skin contact with arsenic can lead to serious, even fatal, health problems, making it considered a significant environmental toxin and carcinogen.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Arsenicnoun

    one of the elements, a solid substance resembling a metal in its physical properties, but in its chemical relations ranking with the nonmetals. It is of a steel-gray color and brilliant luster, though usually dull from tarnish. It is very brittle, and sublimes at 356¡ Fahrenheit. It is sometimes found native, but usually combined with silver, cobalt, nickel, iron, antimony, or sulphur. Orpiment and realgar are two of its sulphur compounds, the first of which is the true arsenicum of the ancients. The element and its compounds are active poisons. Specific gravity from 5.7 to 5.9. Atomic weight 75. Symbol As.

  2. Arsenicnoun

    arsenious oxide or arsenious anhydride; -- called also arsenious acid, white arsenic, and ratsbane

  3. Arsenicadjective

    pertaining to, or derived from, arsenic; -- said of those compounds of arsenic in which this element has its highest equivalence; as, arsenic acid

  4. Etymology: [L. arsenicum, Gr. 'arseniko`n, 'arreniko`n, yellow orpiment, perh. fr. 'arseniko`s or better Attic 'arreniko`s masculine, 'a`rrhn male, on account of its strength, or fr. Per. zernkh: cf. F. arsenic.]

Wikidata

  1. Arsenic

    Arsenic is a chemical element with symbol As and atomic number 33. Arsenic occurs in many minerals, usually in conjunction with sulfur and metals, and also as a pure elemental crystal. It was first documented by Albertus Magnus in 1250. Arsenic is a metalloid. It can exist in various allotropes, although only the gray form has important use in industry. The main use of metallic arsenic is for strengthening alloys of copper and especially lead. Arsenic is a common n-type dopant in semiconductor electronic devices, and the optoelectronic compound gallium arsenide is the most common semiconductor in use after doped silicon. Arsenic and its compounds, especially the trioxide, are used in the production of pesticides, treated wood products, herbicides, and insecticides. These applications are declining, however. Arsenic is notoriously poisonous to multicellular life, although a few species of bacteria are able to use arsenic compounds as respiratory metabolites. Arsenic contamination of groundwater is a problem that affects millions of people across the world.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Arsenic

    ar′sen-ik, n. one of the chemical elements: a mineral poison: a soft, gray-coloured metal.—ns. Ar′senate, Arsē′niate, a salt of arsenic acid.—adjs. Arsen′ic, -al, composed of or containing arsenic: in chemistry, applied to compounds; Arsē′nious, of or containing arsenic.—n. Ar′senite, a salt of arsenious acid. [Gr. arsenikon, arsen, male; the alchemists fancied some metals male, others female.]

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Arsenic

    A shiny gray element with atomic symbol As, atomic number 33, and atomic weight 75. It occurs throughout the universe, mostly in the form of metallic arsenides. Most forms are toxic. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985), arsenic and certain arsenic compounds have been listed as known carcinogens. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)

Suggested Resources

  1. arsenic

    The arsenic symbol -- In this Symbols.com article you will learn about the meaning of the arsenic symbol and its characteristic.

Anagrams for arsenic »

  1. arcsine

  2. carnies

  3. sarcine

  4. cerasin

How to pronounce arsenic?

How to say arsenic in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of arsenic in Chaldean Numerology is: 2

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of arsenic in Pythagorean Numerology is: 6

Examples of arsenic in a Sentence

  1. Winston Churchill:

    Lady Astor: Sir, if you were my husband I would put arsenic in your tea! Churchill: If I were your husband I would drink it!

  2. Janine Barchas:

    The next leap in logic : Do they evidence cataracts ? I'm not a medical expert, but my medical experts who I consulted don't necessarily draw that conclusion, and are cataracts caused by arsenic, well, that's another quantum leap in itself.

  3. Jason Jacobs:

    The safety of infants and children is Beech-Nut's top priority. We are issuing this voluntary recall, because we learned through routine sampling by the State of Alaska that a limited quantity of Beech-Nut Single Grain Rice Cereal products had levels of naturally-occurring inorganic arsenic above the FDA guidance level, even though the rice flour used to produce these products tested below the FDA guidance level for inorganic arsenic.

  4. Kaare Lund Rasmussen:

    Next step is to warn librarians and readers of old books to wear protective gloves, and to advise libraries to store any green painted old books in a dry, dark environment out of harm’s way of people inhaling the air above the books, the reason for the latter recommendation is that arsenic has a tendency to transform to the airborne arsine (AsH3) given the right conditions of humidity and light. Besides the toxicity, arsenic is also carcinogenic.

  5. Donna Lisenby:

    The water in the Cape Fear River next to Duke's Sutton plant had twice as much arsenic in it as the toxic gray coal ash slurry spilling straight out of the pipe into the Dan River in 2014.

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Translations for arsenic

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"arsenic." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 17 Apr. 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/arsenic>.

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