What does amputation mean?

Definitions for amputation
am·pu·ta·tion

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word amputation.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. amputationnoun

    a condition of disability resulting from the loss of one or more limbs

  2. amputationnoun

    a surgical removal of all or part of a limb

Wiktionary

  1. amputationnoun

    surgical removal of all or part of a limb, etc.

  2. amputationnoun

    the loss of a limb, etc. through trauma

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. Amputationnoun

    The operation of cutting off a limb, or other part of the body, with an instrument of steel. The usual method of performing it, in the instance of a leg, is as follows. The proper part for the operation being four or five inches below the knee, the skin and flesh are first to be drawn very tight upwards, and secured from returning by a ligature two or three fingers broad: above this liagure another loose one is passed, for the gripe; which being twisted by means of a stick, may be straitened to any degree at pleasure. Then the patient being conveniently situated, and the operator placed to the inside of the limb, which is to be held by one assistant above, and another below the part designed for the operation, and the gripe sufficiently twisted, to prevent too large an hæmorrhage, the flesh is, with a stroke or two, to be separated from the bone with the dismembering knife. Then the periostium being also divided from the bone with the back of the knife, saw the bone asunder, with as few strokes as possible. When two parallel bones are concerned, the flesh that grows between them must likewise be separated before the use of the saw. This being done, the gripe may be slackened, to give an opportunity of searching for the large blood vessels, and securing the hæmorrhage at their mouths. After making proper applications to the stump, loosen the first ligature, and pull both the skin and the flesh, as far as conveniently may be, over the stump, to cover it; and secure them with the cross stitch made at the depth of half or three quarters of an inch in the skin. Then apply pledgets, astringents, plaisters, and other necessaries. Ephraim Chambers

    Etymology: amputatio, Lat.

    The Amazons, by the amputation of their right breast, had the freer use of their bow. Thomas Browne, Vulgar Errours, b. iv.

Wikipedia

  1. Amputation

    Amputation is the removal of a limb by trauma, medical illness, or surgery. As a surgical measure, it is used to control pain or a disease process in the affected limb, such as malignancy or gangrene. In some cases, it is carried out on individuals as a preventive surgery for such problems. A special case is that of congenital amputation, a congenital disorder, where fetal limbs have been cut off by constrictive bands. In some countries, amputation is currently used to punish people who commit crimes. Amputation has also been used as a tactic in war and acts of terrorism; it may also occur as a war injury. In some cultures and religions, minor amputations or mutilations are considered a ritual accomplishment. When done by a person, the person executing the amputation is an amputator. The oldest evidence of this practice comes from a skeleton found buried in Liang Tebo cave, East Kalimantan, Indonesian Borneo dating back to at least 31,000 years ago, where it was done when the amputee was a young child.In the US, the majority of new amputations occur due to complications of the vascular system (the blood vessels), especially from diabetes. Between 1988 and 1996, there were an average of 133,735 hospital discharges for amputation per year in the US. In 2005, just in the US, there were 1.6 million amputees. In 2013, the US had 2.1 million amputees. Approximately 185,000 amputations occur in the United States each year. In 2009, hospital costs associated with amputation totaled more than $8.3 billion. There will be an estimated 3.6 million people in the US living with limb loss by 2050.

ChatGPT

  1. amputation

    Amputation is a surgical procedure involving the removal of the whole or a part of a body extremity such as an arm, leg, foot, hand, toe, or finger. This removal is usually performed to prevent the spread of disease, relieve pain, or as a treatment due to injury or any medical condition affecting the limb.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Amputationnoun

    the act of amputating; esp. the operation of cutting off a limb or projecting part of the body

  2. Etymology: [L. amputatio: cf. F. amputation.]

Wikidata

  1. Amputation

    Amputation is the removal of a body extremity by trauma, prolonged constriction, or surgery. As a surgical measure, it is used to control pain or a disease process in the affected limb, such as malignancy or gangrene. In some cases, it is carried out on individuals as a preventative surgery for such problems. A special case is that of congenital amputation, a congenital disorder, where fetal limbs have been cut off by constrictive bands. In some countries, amputation of the hands, feet or other body parts is or was used as a form of punishment for people who committed crimes. Amputation has also been used as a tactic in war and acts of terrorism; it may also occur as a war injury. In some cultures and religions, minor amputations or mutilations are considered a ritual accomplishment. Unlike some non-mammalian animals, once removed, human extremities do not grow back, unlike portions of some organs, such as the liver. A transplant or a prosthesis are the only options for recovering the loss. In the US, the majority of new amputations occur due to complications of the vascular system, especially from diabetes. Between 1988 and 1996, there were an average of 133,735 hospital discharges for amputation per year in the US.

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Amputation

    The removal of a limb or other appendage or outgrowth of the body. (Dorland, 28th ed)

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of amputation in Chaldean Numerology is: 5

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of amputation in Pythagorean Numerology is: 4

Examples of amputation in a Sentence

  1. Lucinda Marker:

    What blew John Tull away was the loss of time. John Tull missed Thanksgiving and Christmas, the reality of amputation didn't really sink into John Tull yet, because up until that point John Tull couldn't see John Tull feet. It wasn't until the rehab months it all sunk in.

  2. Sam Crowe:

    It's very concerning that we're seeing that number of deaths and then even people who survived there's a lot of really bad sequela including potential limb amputation and deafness. It's very serious, serious disease.

  3. Alma Faz:

    I'm in a wheelchair, post-amputation, having a CT scan, and it came to me that this is what I want to do, and this is where I want to do it, everybody was very caring and had a common goal for me. And so you can't put a price on that.

  4. Amnesty International Iran researcher:

    This punishment exposes the utter brutality of Iran's justice system and underlines the Iranian authorities' shocking disregard for basic humanity, meting out cruel and inhuman retribution punishments is not justice. Blinding, like stoning, amputation and flogging, is a form of corporal punishment prohibited by international law. Such punishments should not be carried out under any circumstances.

  5. Jeffrey Ortega:

    Five years ago, we asked doctors if amputation would be possible, i was ready for the surgery but then met someone else who had their foot amputated, and it scared me seeing them walking on their knees. I was a scared teenager, but last year I brought it up to doctors again.

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"amputation." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 4 Mar. 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/amputation>.

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