What does all mean?

Definitions for all
ɔlall

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word all.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. all(a)(adj)

    quantifier; used with either mass or count nouns to indicate the whole number or amount of or every one of a class

    "we sat up all night"; "ate all the food"; "all men are mortal"; "all parties are welcome"

  2. all(adverb)

    completely given to or absorbed by

    "became all attention"

  3. wholly, entirely, completely, totally, all, altogether, whole(adverb)

    to a complete degree or to the full or entire extent (`whole' is often used informally for `wholly')

    "he was wholly convinced"; "entirely satisfied with the meal"; "it was completely different from what we expected"; "was completely at fault"; "a totally new situation"; "the directions were all wrong"; "it was not altogether her fault"; "an altogether new approach"; "a whole new idea"

Wiktionary

  1. all(Noun)

    Everything possible.

    She gave her all, and collapsed at the finish line.

  2. all(Noun)

    The totality of one's possessions.

  3. all(Adverb)

    Every individual or anything of the given class, with no exceptions (the noun or noun phrase denoting the class must be plural or uncountable).

  4. all(Adverb)

    Throughout the whole of (a stated period of time; generally used with units of a day or longer).

    The score was 30 all when the rain delay started.

  5. all(Adverb)

    Everyone.

    Don't want to go? All the better since I lost the tickets.

  6. all(Adverb)

    Everything.

  7. all(Adverb)

    Intensifier.

    It suddenly went all quiet.

    Etymology: From Middle English all, from Old English eall ("all, every, entire, whole, universal") , from Proto-Germanic *allaz ("all, whole, every") , from Proto-Indo-European *h₂el- ("all") . Cognate with West Frisian al ("all") , Dutch al ("all") , Scots a' ("all") , German all ("all") , Swedish all ("all") , Norwegian all ("all") , Icelandic allur ("all") , Welsh oll ("all") , Irish uile ("all") , Lithuanian aliái ("all, each, every") .

  8. all(Adverb)

    Entirely.

    'Tis mystery all: th'Immortal dies

    Etymology: From Middle English all, from Old English eall ("all, every, entire, whole, universal") , from Proto-Germanic *allaz ("all, whole, every") , from Proto-Indo-European *h₂el- ("all") . Cognate with West Frisian al ("all") , Dutch al ("all") , Scots a' ("all") , German all ("all") , Swedish all ("all") , Norwegian all ("all") , Icelandic allur ("all") , Welsh oll ("all") , Irish uile ("all") , Lithuanian aliái ("all, each, every") .

  9. all(Adverb)

    Apiece; each.

    The score was 30 all when the rain delay started.

    Etymology: From Middle English all, from Old English eall ("all, every, entire, whole, universal") , from Proto-Germanic *allaz ("all, whole, every") , from Proto-Indo-European *h₂el- ("all") . Cognate with West Frisian al ("all") , Dutch al ("all") , Scots a' ("all") , German all ("all") , Swedish all ("all") , Norwegian all ("all") , Icelandic allur ("all") , Welsh oll ("all") , Irish uile ("all") , Lithuanian aliái ("all, each, every") .

  10. all(Adverb)

    So much.

    Don't want to go? All the better since I lost the tickets.

    Etymology: From Middle English all, from Old English eall ("all, every, entire, whole, universal") , from Proto-Germanic *allaz ("all, whole, every") , from Proto-Indo-European *h₂el- ("all") . Cognate with West Frisian al ("all") , Dutch al ("all") , Scots a' ("all") , German all ("all") , Swedish all ("all") , Norwegian all ("all") , Icelandic allur ("all") , Welsh oll ("all") , Irish uile ("all") , Lithuanian aliái ("all, each, every") .

  11. all(Adverb)

    Even; just.

    All as his straying flock he fed.

    Etymology: From Middle English all, from Old English eall ("all, every, entire, whole, universal") , from Proto-Germanic *allaz ("all, whole, every") , from Proto-Indo-European *h₂el- ("all") . Cognate with West Frisian al ("all") , Dutch al ("all") , Scots a' ("all") , German all ("all") , Swedish all ("all") , Norwegian all ("all") , Icelandic allur ("all") , Welsh oll ("all") , Irish uile ("all") , Lithuanian aliái ("all, each, every") .

Webster Dictionary

  1. All(adj)

    the whole quantity, extent, duration, amount, quality, or degree of; the whole; the whole number of; any whatever; every; as, all the wheat; all the land; all the year; all the strength; all happiness; all abundance; loss of all power; beyond all doubt; you will see us all (or all of us)

    Etymology: [Orig. all, adv., wholly: used with though or if, which being dropped before the subjunctive left all as if in the sense although.]

  2. All(adj)

    any

    Etymology: [Orig. all, adv., wholly: used with though or if, which being dropped before the subjunctive left all as if in the sense although.]

  3. All(adj)

    only; alone; nothing but

    Etymology: [Orig. all, adv., wholly: used with though or if, which being dropped before the subjunctive left all as if in the sense although.]

  4. All(adverb)

    wholly; completely; altogether; entirely; quite; very; as, all bedewed; my friend is all for amusement

    Etymology: [Orig. all, adv., wholly: used with though or if, which being dropped before the subjunctive left all as if in the sense although.]

  5. All(adverb)

    even; just. (Often a mere intensive adjunct.)

    Etymology: [Orig. all, adv., wholly: used with though or if, which being dropped before the subjunctive left all as if in the sense although.]

  6. All(noun)

    the whole number, quantity, or amount; the entire thing; everything included or concerned; the aggregate; the whole; totality; everything or every person; as, our all is at stake

    Etymology: [Orig. all, adv., wholly: used with though or if, which being dropped before the subjunctive left all as if in the sense although.]

  7. All

    although; albeit

    Etymology: [Orig. all, adv., wholly: used with though or if, which being dropped before the subjunctive left all as if in the sense although.]

Freebase

  1. All

    All is an American punk rock band originally from Los Angeles, currently based in Fort Collins, Colorado, formed by Descendents members Bill Stevenson, Karl Alvarez, and Stephen Egerton.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. All

    awl, adj. the whole of: every one of: any whatever.—adv. wholly: completely: entirely: (Shak.) only, alone.—n. the whole: everything: the totality of things—the universe.—n. All′-Fath′er, God.—All (obs.), entirely, altogether, as in 'all to-brake' (Judges, ix. 53). The prefix to- originally belonged to the verb (tó brecan), but as verbs with this prefix were rarely used without all, the fact was forgotten, and the to was erroneously regarded as belonging to the all. Hence came into use all-to = wholly, utterly; All but, everything short of, almost; All in all, all things in all respects, all or everything together—(adverbially) altogether; All over, thoroughly, entirely; All over with, finished, done with (also coll., All up with); All right, a colloquial phrase expressing assent or approbation; All's one, it is just the same; All to one (obs.), altogether.—After all, when everything has been considered, nevertheless; And all, and everything else; And all that, and all the rest of it, et cetera; At all, in the least degree or to the least extent.—For all, notwithstanding; For good and all, finally.—Once for all, once only. [A.S. all, eal; Ger. all, Gael. uile, W. oll.]

Dictionary of Nautical Terms

  1. all

    The total quantity; quite; wholly.--All aback, when all the sails are taken aback by the winds.--All ahoo, or all-a-ugh, confused; hanging over; crooked.--All-a-taunt-o, a ship fully rigged, with masts in and yards crossed.--All hands, the whole ship's company.--All hands ahoy, the boatswain's summons for the whole crew to repair on deck, in distinction from the watch.--All hands make sail! the cheering order when about to chase a strange vessel.--All hands to quarters! the call in armed merchantmen, answering to the Beat to quarters in a man-of-war.--All in the wind, when a vessel's head is too close to the wind, so that all her sails are shivering.--All over, resemblance to a particular object, as a ship in bad kelter: "she's a privateer all over."--All overish, the state of feeling when a man is neither ill nor well, restless in bed and indifferent to meals. In the tropics this is considered as the premonitory symptom of disease, and a warning which should be looked to.--All ready, the answer from the tops when the sails are cast loose, and ready to be dropped.--All standing, fully equipped, or with clothes on. To be brought up all standing, is to be suddenly checked or stopped, without any preparation.--Paid off all standing, without unrigging or waiting to return stores; perhaps recommissioned the next day or hour.--All's well, the sentry's call at each bell struck (or half hour) between the periods of broad daylight, or from 8 P.M. to 4 A.M.--All to pieces, a phrase used for out-and-out, extremely, or excessively; as, "we beat her in sailing all to pieces."--All weathers, any time or season; continually.

Editors Contribution

  1. all

    Every animal on planet earth.

    We all know we are here to create a world where all have optimum health, human rights and a world where wealth, resources and income are shared for the prosperity of all human beings and animals on the earth.

    Submitted by MaryC on April 20, 2020  
  2. all

    Every human being on planet earth.

    We all know we are here to create a world where all have optimum health, human rights and a world where wealth, resources and income are shared for the prosperity of all human beings and animals on the earth.

    Submitted by MaryC on May 18, 2020  
  3. all

    The whole amount.

    All political parties remain united for the benefit of the whole nation.

    Submitted by MaryC on February 15, 2020  

Suggested Resources

  1. all

    Song lyrics by all -- Explore a large variety of song lyrics performed by all on the Lyrics.com website.

  2. ALL

    What does ALL stand for? -- Explore the various meanings for the ALL acronym on the Abbreviations.com website.

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'all' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #47

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'all' in Written Corpus Frequency: #49

  3. Adverbs Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'all' in Adverbs Frequency: #68

How to pronounce all?

  1. Alex
    Alex
    US English
    Daniel
    Daniel
    British
    Karen
    Karen
    Australian
    Veena
    Veena
    Indian

How to say all in sign language?

  1. all

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of all in Chaldean Numerology is: 7

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of all in Pythagorean Numerology is: 7

Examples of all in a Sentence

  1. Anthony Burgess:

    We all need money, but there are degrees of desperation.

  2. Noria Morales:

    Working parents might only have a few hours with a kid at night -- and forget seeing friends, we wanted to balance all of these things and imagine a place where we could all come together. It's striking a chord with a lot of people.

  3. Ron Mastrogiovanni:

    There are all sorts of programs to help seniors.

  4. Mike Chinoy:

    All the choices with North Korea are bad, there's no evidence that the sanctions that have been in place in one form or another for many, many years have had any impact on North Korean behavior, even if they have hurt the North Koreans to some degree economically. So a ratcheting up of sanctions is unlikely to have the desired effect.

  5. Michael Short:

    We all knew Hillary Clinton was desperate to avoid the media after months of controversy, but employing a moving rope line takes ducking reporters to absurd new heights, clearly the Fourth of July for Hillary Clinton means independence from answering tough questions.

Images & Illustrations of all

  1. allallallallall

Popularity rank by frequency of use

all#1#25#10000

Translations for all

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

Get even more translations for all »

Translation

Find a translation for the all definition in other languages:

Select another language:

  • - Select -
  • 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified)
  • 繁體中文 (Chinese - Traditional)
  • Español (Spanish)
  • Esperanto (Esperanto)
  • 日本語 (Japanese)
  • Português (Portuguese)
  • Deutsch (German)
  • العربية (Arabic)
  • Français (French)
  • Русский (Russian)
  • ಕನ್ನಡ (Kannada)
  • 한국어 (Korean)
  • עברית (Hebrew)
  • Gaeilge (Irish)
  • Українська (Ukrainian)
  • اردو (Urdu)
  • Magyar (Hungarian)
  • मानक हिन्दी (Hindi)
  • Indonesia (Indonesian)
  • Italiano (Italian)
  • தமிழ் (Tamil)
  • Türkçe (Turkish)
  • తెలుగు (Telugu)
  • ภาษาไทย (Thai)
  • Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese)
  • Čeština (Czech)
  • Polski (Polish)
  • Bahasa Indonesia (Indonesian)
  • Românește (Romanian)
  • Nederlands (Dutch)
  • Ελληνικά (Greek)
  • Latinum (Latin)
  • Svenska (Swedish)
  • Dansk (Danish)
  • Suomi (Finnish)
  • فارسی (Persian)
  • ייִדיש (Yiddish)
  • հայերեն (Armenian)
  • Norsk (Norwegian)
  • English (English)

Discuss these all definitions with the community:

Word of the Day

Would you like us to send you a FREE new word definition delivered to your inbox daily?

Please enter your email address:


Citation

Use the citation below to add this definition to your bibliography:

Style:MLAChicagoAPA

"all." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2020. Web. 14 Aug. 2020. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/all>.

Are we missing a good definition for all? Don't keep it to yourself...

Free, no signup required:

Add to Chrome

Get instant definitions for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

Free, no signup required:

Add to Firefox

Get instant definitions for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

Nearby & related entries:

Alternative searches for all:


Thanks for your vote! We truly appreciate your support.