What does accretion mean?

Definitions for accretion
əˈkri ʃənac·cre·tion

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word accretion.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. accretion, accumulationnoun

    an increase by natural growth or addition

  2. accretionnoun

    something contributing to growth or increase

    "he scraped away the accretions of paint"; "the central city surrounded by recent accretions"

  3. accretionnoun

    (astronomy) the formation of a celestial object by the effect of gravity pulling together surrounding objects and gases

  4. accretionnoun

    (biology) growth by addition as by the adhesion of parts or particles

  5. accretionnoun

    (geology) an increase in land resulting from alluvial deposits or waterborne sediment

  6. accretionnoun

    (law) an increase in a beneficiary's share in an estate (as when a co-beneficiary dies or fails to meet some condition or rejects the inheritance)

Wiktionary

  1. accretionnoun

    The act of increasing by natural growth; especially the increase of organic bodies by the internal accession of parts; organic growth.

  2. accretionnoun

    The act of increasing, or the matter added, by an accession of parts externally; an extraneous addition; as, an accretion of earth.

    A mineral ... augments not by grown, but by accretion.

  3. accretionnoun

    Something added externally to promote growth the external growth of an item.

  4. accretionnoun

    concretion; coherence of separate particles; as, the accretion of particles so as to form a solid mass.

  5. accretionnoun

    A growing together of parts naturally separate, as of the fingers or toes.

  6. accretionnoun

    The gradual increase of land by deposition of water-borne sediment.

  7. accretionnoun

    The adhering of property to something else, by which the owner of one thing becomes possessed of a right to another; generally, gain of land by the washing up of sand or sail from the sea or a river, or by a gradual recession of the water from the usual watermark.

  8. accretionnoun

    Gain to an heir or legatee, failure of a coheir to the same succession, or a co-legatee of the same thing, to take his share.

  9. Etymology: * First attested in the 1610's.

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. ACCRETIONnoun

    The act of growing to another, so as to encrease it.

    Etymology: accretio, Lat.

    Plants do nourish; inanimate bodies do not: they have an accretion, but no alimentation. Francis Bacon, Nat. Hist. №. 602.

    The changes seem to be effected by the exhaling of the moisture, which may leave the tinging corpuscles more dense, and something augmented by the accretion of the oily and earthy parts of that moisture. Isaac Newton, Opticks.

    Infants support abstinence worst, from the quantity of aliment consumed in accretion. John Arbuthnot, on Aliments.

ChatGPT

  1. accretion

    Accretion is the process of incremental growth or increase in size, usually by gradual accumulation, addition, or adherence of external parts or particles. This term is often used in various fields such as geology, astronomy, and finance.

  2. accretion

    Accretion is the process of growth or increase, typically by gradual accumulation or addition of layers or matter. This term is often used in various sciences such as geology, astronomy and biology to describe how something grows or expands over time.

  3. accretion

    Accretion is the process or act of accumulation or growth, typically referring to the increase in size and mass of something over time. This term is often used in various fields such as astronomy, geology, finance, and biology to describe different types of growth or expansion.

  4. accretion

    Accretion is a natural or artificial process of growth or increase in size, typically by a gradual accumulation of additional layers or matter. It can occur in various fields such as astronomy, geology, finance, and biology. In finance, it refers to the gradual increase of the value of an investment due to compounding interest or reinvestment. In astronomy or geology, it refers to the process by which mass is added to a celestial body or landmass.

  5. accretion

    Accretion is a process where an object increases or grows by gradual addition or accumulation. This term is often used in various fields such as sciences, finance, and law, referring to the growth of planets, increase in assets, or addition to land, respectively. It involves a gradual build-up or layering over time.

  6. accretion

    Accretion is the process of growth or increase in size or amount, typically by the gradual accumulation of additional layers or matter. This term is often used in various scientific fields such as physics, geology, and astronomy to describe processes such as the formation of planets or growth of crystals.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Accretionnoun

    the act of increasing by natural growth; esp. the increase of organic bodies by the internal accession of parts; organic growth

  2. Accretionnoun

    the act of increasing, or the matter added, by an accession of parts externally; an extraneous addition; as, an accretion of earth

  3. Accretionnoun

    concretion; coherence of separate particles; as, the accretion of particles so as to form a solid mass

  4. Accretionnoun

    a growing together of parts naturally separate, as of the fingers toes

  5. Accretionnoun

    the adhering of property to something else, by which the owner of one thing becomes possessed of a right to another; generally, gain of land by the washing up of sand or sail from the sea or a river, or by a gradual recession of the water from the usual watermark

  6. Accretionnoun

    gain to an heir or legatee, failure of a coheir to the same succession, or a co-legatee of the same thing, to take his share

  7. Etymology: [L. accretio, fr. accrescere to increase. Cf. Crescent, Increase, Accrue.]

Wikidata

  1. Accretion

    In astrophysics, the term accretion is used for at least two distinct processes. The first and most common is the growth of a massive object by gravitationally attracting more matter, typically gaseous matter in an accretion disk. Accretion disks are common around smaller stars or stellar remnants in a close binary or black holes in the centers of spiral galaxies. Some dynamics in the disk are necessary to allow orbiting gas to lose angular momentum and fall onto the central massive object. Occasionally, this can result in stellar surface fusion. The second process is somewhat analogous to the one in atmospheric science. In the nebular theory, accretion refers to the collision and sticking of cooled microscopic dust and ice particles electrostatically, in protoplanetary disks and gas giant protoplanet systems, eventually leading to planetesimals which gravitationally accrete more small particles and other planetesimals. Use of the term accretion disk for the protoplanetary disk thus leads to confusion over the planetary accretion process, although in many cases it may well be that both accretion processes are happening simultaneously. T Tauri is an example of this phenomenon.

Anagrams for accretion »

  1. anorectic

  2. neoarctic

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of accretion in Chaldean Numerology is: 4

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of accretion in Pythagorean Numerology is: 7

Examples of accretion in a Sentence

  1. Alexander Graham Bell:

    The most successful men in the end are those whose success is the result of steady accretion... It is the man who carefully advances step by step, with his mind becoming wider and wider - and progressively better able to grasp any theme or situation - persevering in what he knows to be practical, and concentrating his thought upon it, who is bound to succeed in the greatest degree.

  2. Elena Murchikova:

    This should help improve our understanding of how accretion onto black holes works.

  3. Moncef Slaoui:

    Any accretion in value of everything I own that has anything to do with Covid, which is my GlaxoSmithKline shares, any accretion in value by the end of my mission will look -- if there has been increasing value with it -- I'll sell those shares, and I'll give that incremental value to the NIH for research.

  4. Neil Dwane:

    ABI is paying a high price but accretion to earnings from low debt costs would be something in the region of 15 percent. However, we think the return on this deal could be a relatively disappointing 8 percent after 10 years.

  5. Erin Kara:

    Tidal disruption events offer us this rare view at the most common kind of supermassive black hole in the universe— these so-called dormant supermassive black holes, tidal disruption events, where the stellar debris causes the formation of a temporary accretion disk, offers us a way to probe this population of supermassive black holes.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

accretion#10000#33870#100000

Translations for accretion

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"accretion." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 19 May 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/accretion>.

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