What does abstraction mean?

Definitions for abstraction
æbˈstræk ʃənab·strac·tion

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word abstraction.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. abstraction, abstractnoun

    a concept or idea not associated with any specific instance

    "he loved her only in the abstract--not in person"

  2. abstractionnoun

    the act of withdrawing or removing something

  3. abstraction, generalization, generalisationnoun

    the process of formulating general concepts by abstracting common properties of instances

  4. abstractionnoun

    an abstract painting

  5. abstractedness, abstractionnoun

    preoccupation with something to the exclusion of all else

  6. abstraction, abstract entitynoun

    a general concept formed by extracting common features from specific examples

Wiktionary

  1. abstractionnoun

    The act of abstracting, separating, or withdrawing, or the state of being withdrawn; withdrawal.

    Etymology: * First attested around 1400.

  2. abstractionnoun

    The act of leaving out of consideration one or more properties of a complex object so as to attend to others; analysis.

    Note: Abstraction is necessary to classification, by which organisms are grouped into genera and species according to the qualities they share.

    Etymology: * First attested around 1400.

  3. abstractionnoun

    An idea or notion of an abstract, or theoretical nature; as, to fight for mere abstractions.

    Etymology: * First attested around 1400.

  4. abstractionnoun

    A separation from worldly objects; a recluse life; as, a hermit's abstraction.

    Etymology: * First attested around 1400.

  5. abstractionnoun

    Absence or absorption of mind; inattention to present objects.

    Etymology: * First attested around 1400.

  6. abstractionnoun

    The taking surreptitiously for one's own use part of the property of another; purloining.

    Etymology: * First attested around 1400.

  7. abstractionnoun

    A separation of volatile parts by the act of distillation. - Nicholson

    Etymology: * First attested around 1400.

  8. abstractionnoun

    Removal of water from a river, lake, or aquifer, typically for industrial or agricultural uses.

    Etymology: * First attested around 1400.

  9. abstractionnoun

    Any generalization technique that ignores or hides details to capture some kind of commonality between different instances for the purpose of controlling the intellectual complexity of engineered systems, particularly software systems.

    Etymology: * First attested around 1400.

  10. abstractionnoun

    Any intellectual construct produced through the technique of abstraction.

    Etymology: * First attested around 1400.

  11. abstractionnoun

    An abstract creation, or piece of art.

    Etymology: * First attested around 1400.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Abstractionadjective

    the act of abstracting, separating, or withdrawing, or the state of being withdrawn; withdrawal

    Etymology: [Cf. F. abstraction. See Abstract, a.]

  2. Abstractionadjective

    the act process of leaving out of consideration one or more properties of a complex object so as to attend to others; analysis. Thus, when the mind considers the form of a tree by itself, or the color of the leaves as separate from their size or figure, the act is called abstraction. So, also, when it considers whiteness, softness, virtue, existence, as separate from any particular objects

    Etymology: [Cf. F. abstraction. See Abstract, a.]

  3. Abstractionadjective

    an idea or notion of an abstract, or theoretical nature; as, to fight for mere abstractions

    Etymology: [Cf. F. abstraction. See Abstract, a.]

  4. Abstractionadjective

    a separation from worldly objects; a recluse life; as, a hermit's abstraction

    Etymology: [Cf. F. abstraction. See Abstract, a.]

  5. Abstractionadjective

    absence or absorption of mind; inattention to present objects

    Etymology: [Cf. F. abstraction. See Abstract, a.]

  6. Abstractionadjective

    the taking surreptitiously for one's own use part of the property of another; purloining

    Etymology: [Cf. F. abstraction. See Abstract, a.]

  7. Abstractionadjective

    a separation of volatile parts by the act of distillation

    Etymology: [Cf. F. abstraction. See Abstract, a.]

Freebase

  1. Abstraction

    Abstraction is a process by which concepts are derived from the usage and classification of literal concepts, first principles, or other methods. "An abstraction" is the product of this process – a concept that acts as a super-categorical noun for all subordinate concepts, and connects any related concepts as a group, field, or category. Abstractions may be formed by reducing the information content of a concept or an observable phenomenon, typically to retain only information which is relevant for a particular purpose. For example, abstracting a leather soccer ball to the more general idea of a ball retains only the information on general ball attributes and behavior, eliminating the other characteristics of that particular ball.

How to pronounce abstraction?

How to say abstraction in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of abstraction in Chaldean Numerology is: 6

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of abstraction in Pythagorean Numerology is: 5

Examples of abstraction in a Sentence

  1. Abraham Harold Maslow:

    Become aware of internal, subjective subverbal experiences, so that these experiences can be brought into the world of abstraction, of conversation, of naming, etc., with the consequence that it immediately becomes possible for a certain amount of control to be exerted over these hither unconscious and uncontrollable processes

  2. Henry Havelock Ellis:

    Dancing is the loftiest, the most moving, the most beautiful of the arts, because it is no mere translation or abstraction from life, it is life itself.

  3. Cobb Scott:

    There have been a couple of meta-analyses done in adult samples, but this is the first one to be done specifically in adolescent and young adult samples, we looked at everything from learning and memory to different aspects of executive functioning such as abstraction ability.

  4. Musin Almat Zhumabekovich:

    1. If naive optimism disappears, it will destroy the overwhelming majority of the economy's market. If people stop believing and sink into skepticism. The deceitful economics of marketing exists thanks to the naive optimism that tomorrow will be better. 2. Love is phantom nostalgia. 3. Thinking is a neural-gene transformation under the influence of instinctual defects and vices, paradoxes like selfishness and self-deception. What shapes the quantum deformations of the future. 4. You are immersed in an abundance of endless emptiness, where you get more and more confused and this leads you to madness. 5. The paradox is not a faceted, symbolic aphorism of the subconscious. 6. An art critic and a psychologist are very similar to each other, both of them are looking for insanity in abstraction, a grain of logic. 7. Kazakh woman is a hot deity, she is the sexiest notes of desire. Author: Musin Almat Zhumabekovich

  5. Douglas Burton:

    The main thing that’s killing 500,000 people in Nigeria, it’s not an abstraction, abstractions do n’t kill people. People kill people. And the people who are killing people are doing it in the name of religion.

Images & Illustrations of abstraction

  1. abstractionabstractionabstractionabstractionabstraction

Popularity rank by frequency of use

abstraction#10000#15864#100000

Translations for abstraction

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

Get even more translations for abstraction »

Translation

Find a translation for the abstraction definition in other languages:

Select another language:

  • - Select -
  • 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified)
  • 繁體中文 (Chinese - Traditional)
  • Español (Spanish)
  • Esperanto (Esperanto)
  • 日本語 (Japanese)
  • Português (Portuguese)
  • Deutsch (German)
  • العربية (Arabic)
  • Français (French)
  • Русский (Russian)
  • ಕನ್ನಡ (Kannada)
  • 한국어 (Korean)
  • עברית (Hebrew)
  • Gaeilge (Irish)
  • Українська (Ukrainian)
  • اردو (Urdu)
  • Magyar (Hungarian)
  • मानक हिन्दी (Hindi)
  • Indonesia (Indonesian)
  • Italiano (Italian)
  • தமிழ் (Tamil)
  • Türkçe (Turkish)
  • తెలుగు (Telugu)
  • ภาษาไทย (Thai)
  • Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese)
  • Čeština (Czech)
  • Polski (Polish)
  • Bahasa Indonesia (Indonesian)
  • Românește (Romanian)
  • Nederlands (Dutch)
  • Ελληνικά (Greek)
  • Latinum (Latin)
  • Svenska (Swedish)
  • Dansk (Danish)
  • Suomi (Finnish)
  • فارسی (Persian)
  • ייִדיש (Yiddish)
  • հայերեն (Armenian)
  • Norsk (Norwegian)
  • English (English)

Word of the Day

Would you like us to send you a FREE new word definition delivered to your inbox daily?

Please enter your email address:


Discuss these abstraction definitions with the community:

0 Comments

    Citation

    Use the citation below to add this definition to your bibliography:

    Style:MLAChicagoAPA

    "abstraction." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2021. Web. 8 Dec. 2021. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/abstraction>.

    Are we missing a good definition for abstraction? Don't keep it to yourself...

    Browse Definitions.net

    Free, no signup required:

    Add to Chrome

    Get instant definitions for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

    Free, no signup required:

    Add to Firefox

    Get instant definitions for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

    Quiz

    Are you a words master?

    »
    a wide scope
    • A. sweep
    • B. canopy
    • C. sheath
    • D. ignominy

    Nearby & related entries:

    Alternative searches for abstraction: