What does Temple mean?

Definitions for Temple
ˈtɛm pəltem·ple

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word Temple.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. templenoun

    place of worship consisting of an edifice for the worship of a deity

  2. templenoun

    the flat area on either side of the forehead

    "the veins in his temple throbbed"

  3. templenoun

    an edifice devoted to special or exalted purposes

  4. synagogue, temple, tabernaclenoun

    (Judaism) the place of worship for a Jewish congregation

Wiktionary

  1. templenoun

    A contrivance used in a loom for keeping the web stretched transversely.

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. Templenoun

    Etymology: temple, Fr. templum, Lat.

    The honour’d gods
    Throng our large temples with the shews of peace. William Shakespeare.

    Here we have no temple but the wood, no assembly but hornbeasts. William Shakespeare, As you like it.

    Most sacrilegious murther hath broke ope
    The lord’s anointed temple, and stole thence
    The life o’ th’ building. William Shakespeare, Macbeth.

    This guest of Summer,
    The temple haunting martlet. William Shakespeare, Macbeth.

    Her sunny locks
    Hang on her temples like a golden fleece. William Shakespeare.

    We may apply intercipients of mastich upon the temples; frontals also may be applied. Richard Wiseman, Surgery.

    To procure sleep, he uses the scratching of the temples and ears; that even mollifies wild beasts. Arbuthnot.

    The weapon enter’d close above his ear,
    Cold through his temples glides the whizzing spear. Alexander Pope.

Wikipedia

  1. Temple

    A temple (from the Latin templum) is a building reserved for spiritual rituals and activities such as prayer and sacrifice. Religions which erect temples include Christianity (whose temples are typically called churches), Hinduism (whose temples are called Mandir), Buddhism, Sikhism (whose temples are called gurudwara), Jainism (whose temples are sometimes called derasar), Islam (whose temples are called mosques), Judaism (whose temples are called synagogues), Zoroastrianism (whose temples are sometimes called Agiary), the Baha'i Faith (which are often simply referred to as Baha'i House of Worship), Taoism (which are sometimes called Daoguan), Shinto (which are sometimes called Jinja), Confucianism (which are sometimes called the Temple of Confucius), and ancient religions such as the Ancient Egyptian religion and the Ancient Greek religion. The form and function of temples are thus very variable, though they are often considered by believers to be, in some sense, the "house" of one or more deities. Typically, offerings of some sort are made to the deity, and other rituals are enacted, and a special group of clergy maintain and operate the temple. The degree to which the whole population of believers can access the building varies significantly; often parts, or even the whole main building. can only be accessed by the clergy. Temples typically have a main building and a larger precinct, which may contain many other buildings or may be a dome-shaped structure, much like an igloo. The word comes from Ancient Rome, where a templum constituted a sacred precinct as defined by a priest, or augur. It has the same root as the word "template," a plan in preparation for the building that was marked out on the ground by the augur.

ChatGPT

  1. temple

    A temple is a dedicated place of worship, typically associated with a specific religious or spiritual belief system, where rituals, ceremonies, and prayers are conducted by followers or religious leaders. Temples are often architecturally and artistically elaborate structures that serve as a focal point for religious activities and symbolize the sacredness and divinity of the beliefs practiced within. They can be found in various forms across different cultures and religions, and their design and purpose can vary greatly depending on the specific tradition they serve.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Templenoun

    a contrivence used in a loom for keeping the web stretched transversely

  2. Templenoun

    the space, on either side of the head, back of the eye and forehead, above the zygomatic arch and in front of the ear

  3. Templenoun

    one of the side bars of a pair of spectacles, jointed to the bows, and passing one on either side of the head to hold the spectacles in place

  4. Templenoun

    a place or edifice dedicated to the worship of some deity; as, the temple of Jupiter at Athens, or of Juggernaut in India

  5. Templenoun

    the edifice erected at Jerusalem for the worship of Jehovah

  6. Templenoun

    hence, among Christians, an edifice erected as a place of public worship; a church

  7. Templenoun

    fig.: Any place in which the divine presence specially resides

  8. Templeverb

    to build a temple for; to appropriate a temple to; as, to temple a god

Wikidata

  1. Temple

    A temple is a structure reserved for religious or spiritual activities, such as prayer and sacrifice, or analogous rites. A templum constituted a sacred precinct as defined by a priest, or augur. It has the same root as the word "template," a plan in preparation of the building that was marked out on the ground by the augur. Templa also became associated with the dwelling places of a god or gods. Despite the specific set of meanings associated with the religion of the ancient Rome, the word has now become quite widely used to describe a house of worship for any number of religions and is even used for time periods prior to the Romans.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Temple

    tem′pl, n. an edifice erected to a deity or for religious purposes: a place of worship: in London, two inns of court, once occupied by the Knights Templars. [L. templum, prob. for temulum, a space marked out for religious purposes, dim. of tempus, a piece cut off.]

  2. Temple

    tem′pl, n. the flat portion of either side of the head above the cheekbone.—adj. Tem′poral, pertaining to the temples. [O. Fr. temple—L. tempora, the temples, pl. of tempus, time.]

The Roycroft Dictionary

  1. temple

    A place other than a bed, where one takes one's shoes off. (There are Jewish temples, pagan temples and money temples, but no Christian temples: the latter has no need of them, because Christian religion is the only one in the world in which its believers and followers practise exactly what its Founder taught. Each Christian may point to himself and say proudly, "Ecce Temple," hence, etc., etc., etc.)

Suggested Resources

  1. temple

    The temple symbol -- In this Symbols.com article you will learn about the meaning of the temple symbol and its characteristic.

Etymology and Origins

  1. Temple

    The seat of the “Knights Templars” in this country down to the time of the dissolution of their Order by Edward II. in 1313.

Mythology

  1. Temple

    An edifice erected to the honor of a god or goddess in which the sacrifices were offered.

Entomology

  1. Temple

    the posterior part of the gena; behind, before or beneath the eye.

Surnames Frequency by Census Records

  1. TEMPLE

    According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Temple is ranked #1590 in terms of the most common surnames in America.

    The Temple surname appeared 22,549 times in the 2010 census and if you were to sample 100,000 people in the United States, approximately 8 would have the surname Temple.

    79.7% or 17,983 total occurrences were White.
    14.5% or 3,288 total occurrences were Black.
    2.2% or 514 total occurrences were of Hispanic origin.
    2.1% or 478 total occurrences were of two or more races.
    0.8% or 192 total occurrences were Asian.
    0.4% or 97 total occurrences were American Indian or Alaskan Native.

British National Corpus

  1. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Temple' in Nouns Frequency: #1793

How to pronounce Temple?

How to say Temple in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of Temple in Chaldean Numerology is: 2

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of Temple in Pythagorean Numerology is: 8

Examples of Temple in a Sentence

  1. Katharine Hepburn:

    Acting is the most minor of gifts and not a very high-class way to earn a living. After all, Shirley Temple could do it at the age of four.

  2. Rattanak Te:

    Angkor Wat is the most famous sacred ... temple in Cambodia, where everyone not only tourists but also Cambodians themselves has to pay respect, it definitely upsets me and all Cambodians, because outsiders will think we Cambodian people are careless and do not take good care of this World Heritage (site) by allowing these tourists to do such an unacceptable act.

  3. Adisorn Nuchdamrong:

    They must be of some value for the temple to keep them, but for what is beyond me.

  4. Yotin Lopnikorn:

    This is the second time I have seen this temple in this condition, now I think we need to save this place.

  5. Andrew Adeleke:

    The church is not supposed to be a graveyard, it is supposed to be a temple of celebration and worship and the beauty is to be able to express our love to God, even when things are not perfect in our lives.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

Temple#1#4338#10000

Translations for Temple

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"Temple." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 23 Apr. 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/Temple>.

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