What does Storm mean?

Definitions for Storm
stɔrmstorm

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word Storm.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. storm, violent stormnoun

    a violent weather condition with winds 64-72 knots (11 on the Beaufort scale) and precipitation and thunder and lightning

  2. storm, tempestnoun

    a violent commotion or disturbance

    "the storms that had characterized their relationship had died away"; "it was only a tempest in a teapot"

  3. stormverb

    a direct and violent assault on a stronghold

  4. ramp, rage, stormverb

    behave violently, as if in state of a great anger

  5. storm, forceverb

    take by force

    "Storm the fort"

  6. stormverb

    rain, hail, or snow hard and be very windy, often with thunder or lightning

    "If it storms, we'll need shelter"

  7. stormverb

    blow hard

    "It was storming all night"

  8. storm, surpriseverb

    attack by storm; attack suddenly

Wiktionary

  1. stormnoun

    Any disturbed state of the atmosphere, especially as affecting the earth's surface, and strongly implying destructive or unpleasant weather.

  2. stormnoun

    a wind scale for very strong wind, stronger than a gale, less than a hurricane (10 or higher on the Beaufort scale).

  3. stormnoun

    A violent assault on a stronghold or fortified position.

  4. stormverb

    To move quickly and noisily like a storm, usually in a state of uproar or anger.

    She stormed out of the room.

  5. stormverb

    To assault (a stronghold or fortification) with military forces.

    Troops stormed the complex.

  6. Etymology: sturmaz, whence also Old High German sturm, Old Norse stormr

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. STORMnoun

    Etymology: ystorm, Welsh; storm , Saxon; storm, Dutch; stormo, Italian.

    O turn thy rudder hitherward a while,
    Here may thy storm-beat vessel safely ride. Edmund Spenser.

    We hear this fearful tempest sing,
    Yet seek no shelter to avoid the storm. William Shakespeare.

    Them she upstays, mindless the while
    Herself, though fairest unsupported flower,
    From her best prop so far and storm so nigh. John Milton.

    Sulphurous hail shot after us in storm. John Milton.

    Then stay my child! storms beat and rolls the main;
    Oh, beat those storms and roll the seas in vain. Alexander Pope.

    How by storm the walls were won,
    Or how the victor sack’d and burnt the town. Dryden.

    Whilst I in Ireland nourish a mighty band,
    I will stir up in England some black storm. William Shakespeare.

    Her sister
    Began to scold and raise up such a storm,
    That mortal ears might hardly endure the din. William Shakespeare.

    As oft as we are delivered from those either imminent or present calamities, against the storm and tempest whereof we all instantly craved favour from above, let it be a question what we should render unto God for his blessings, universally, sensibly, and extraordinarily bestowed. Richard Hooker.

  2. To Stormverb

    To attack by open force.

    Etymology: from the noun.

    From ploughs and harrows sent to seek renown,
    They fight in fields, and storm the shaken town. Dryden.

    There the brazen tow’r was storm’d of old,
    When Jove descended in almighty gold. Alexander Pope.

  3. To Stormverb

    So now he storms with many a sturdy stoure,
    So now his blustering blast each coast doth scoure. Edmund Spenser.

    Hoarse, and all in rage,
    As mock’d they storm. John Milton, Paradise Lost.

    When you return, the master storms, the lady scolds. Jonathan Swift.

    While thus they rail, and scold, and storm,
    It passes but for common form. Jonathan Swift.

Wikipedia

  1. Storm

    A storm is any disturbed state of the natural environment or the atmosphere of an astronomical body. It may be marked by significant disruptions to normal conditions such as strong wind, tornadoes, hail, thunder and lightning (a thunderstorm), heavy precipitation (snowstorm, rainstorm), heavy freezing rain (ice storm), strong winds (tropical cyclone, windstorm), wind transporting some substance through the atmosphere such as in a dust storm, among other forms of severe weather. Storms have the potential to harm lives and property via storm surge, heavy rain or snow causing flooding or road impassibility, lightning, wildfires, and vertical and horizontal wind shear. Systems with significant rainfall and duration help alleviate drought in places they move through. Heavy snowfall can allow special recreational activities to take place which would not be possible otherwise, such as skiing and snowmobiling. The English word comes from Proto-Germanic *sturmaz meaning "noise, tumult".Storms are created when a center of low pressure develops with the system of high pressure surrounding it. This combination of opposing forces can create winds and result in the formation of storm clouds such as cumulonimbus. Small localized areas of low pressure can form from hot air rising off hot ground, resulting in smaller disturbances such as dust devils and whirlwinds.

ChatGPT

  1. storm

    A storm is a weather phenomenon characterized by intense and turbulent atmospheric disturbances, often including strong winds, rain, lightning, and thunder. Storms typically occur due to a combination of atmospheric instability, temperature variations, and pressure differences, resulting in violent disturbances in the Earth's atmosphere. Storms can take various forms, such as thunderstorms, hurricanes, blizzards, or tornadoes, and their severity and duration can vary greatly.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Stormnoun

    a violent disturbance of the atmosphere, attended by wind, rain, snow, hail, or thunder and lightning; hence, often, a heavy fall of rain, snow, or hail, whether accompanied with wind or not

  2. Stormnoun

    a violent agitation of human society; a civil, political, or domestic commotion; sedition, insurrection, or war; violent outbreak; clamor; tumult

  3. Stormnoun

    a heavy shower or fall, any adverse outburst of tumultuous force; violence

  4. Stormnoun

    a violent assault on a fortified place; a furious attempt of troops to enter and take a fortified place by scaling the walls, forcing the gates, or the like

  5. Stormverb

    to assault; to attack, and attempt to take, by scaling walls, forcing gates, breaches, or the like; as, to storm a fortified town

  6. Stormverb

    to raise a tempest

  7. Stormverb

    to blow with violence; also, to rain, hail, snow, or the like, usually in a violent manner, or with high wind; -- used impersonally; as, it storms

  8. Stormverb

    to rage; to be in a violent passion; to fume

  9. Etymology: [Cf. AS. styrman.]

Wikidata

  1. Storm

    A storm is any disturbed state of an astronomical body's atmosphere especially affecting its surface, and strongly implying severe weather. It may be marked by strong wind, hail, thunder and/or lightning, heavy precipitation, heavy freezing rain, strong winds, or wind transporting some substance through the atmosphere as in a dust storm, blizzard, sandstorm, etc. Storms generally lead to negative impacts to lives and property such as storm surge, heavy rain or snow, lightning, wildfires, and vertical wind shear; however, systems with significant rainfall can alleviate drought in places they move through. Heavy snowfall can allow special recreational activities to take place which would not be possible otherwise, such as skiing and snowmobiling. The English word comes from Proto-Germanic *sturmaz meaning "noise, tumult".

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Storm

    storm, n. a violent commotion of the atmosphere producing wind, rain, &c.: a tempest: a fall of snow, a prolonged frost: an outbreak of anger, or the like: violent agitation of society: commotion: tumult: calamity: (mil.) an assault.—v.i. to raise a tempest: to blow with violence: to be in a violent passion.—v.t. to attack by open force: to assault.—n. Storm′-ā′rea, the area covered by a storm.—adjs. Storm′-beat, -beat′en, beaten or injured by storms.—ns. Storm′-belt, a belt of maximum storm frequency; Storm′-bird, a petrel.—adj. Storm′bound, delayed by storms.—ns. Storm′-card, a sailors' chart showing from the direction of the wind the ship's position in relation to a storm-centre, and accordingly the proper course to be shaped; Storm′-cen′tre, the position of lowest pressure in a cyclonic storm; Storm′-cock, the fieldfare: the mistle-thrush; Storm′-cone, a cone of canvas stretched on a frame 3 feet high as a storm-signal; Storm′-door, an outer supplementary door to shelter the interior of a building; Storm′-drum, a canvas cylinder extended on a hoop 3 feet high by 3 feet wide, hoisted in conjunction with the cone as a storm-signal.—adj. Storm′ful, abounding with storms.—ns. Storm′fulness; Storm′-glass, a tube containing a solution of camphor, the amount of the precipitate varying with the weather; Storm′-house, a temporary shelter for men working on a railway, &c.; Storm′iness; Storm′ing-par′ty, the party of men who first enter the breach or scale the walls in storming a fortress.—adj. Storm′less, without storms.—ns. Storm′-sail, a sail of the strongest canvas, for stormy weather; Storm′-sig′nal, a signal displayed on seacoasts, &c., to intimate the approach of a storm by the cone and drum, or by flags and lanterns in the United States; Storm′-stay, a stay on which a storm-sail is set.—adjs. Storm′-stayed, hindered from proceeding by storms; Storm′-tossed, tossed about by storms: much agitated by conflicting passions.—ns. Storm′-wind, a wind that brings a storm, a hurricane; Storm′-win′dow, a window raised above the roof, slated above and at the sides.—adj. Storm′y, having many storms: agitated with furious winds: boisterous: violent: passionate. [A.S. storm; Ice. stormr; from root of stir.]

Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

  1. storm

    A violent assault on a fortified place; a furious attempt of troops to enter and take a fortified place by scaling the walls, forcing the gates, and the like. Also, to assault; to attack and attempt to take by scaling the walls, forcing gates or breaches, and the like; as, to storm a fortified town.

Suggested Resources

  1. storm

    Song lyrics by storm -- Explore a large variety of song lyrics performed by storm on the Lyrics.com website.

Surnames Frequency by Census Records

  1. STORM

    According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Storm is ranked #3596 in terms of the most common surnames in America.

    The Storm surname appeared 9,895 times in the 2010 census and if you were to sample 100,000 people in the United States, approximately 3 would have the surname Storm.

    93.1% or 9,219 total occurrences were White.
    2.1% or 209 total occurrences were of Hispanic origin.
    1.9% or 196 total occurrences were of two or more races.
    1.1% or 112 total occurrences were Black.
    1% or 106 total occurrences were American Indian or Alaskan Native.
    0.5% or 53 total occurrences were Asian.

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Storm' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #4062

  2. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Storm' in Nouns Frequency: #1476

How to pronounce Storm?

How to say Storm in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of Storm in Chaldean Numerology is: 2

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of Storm in Pythagorean Numerology is: 4

Examples of Storm in a Sentence

  1. Andrew Frankel:

    You're definitely witnessing a perfect storm in terms of China timing, people on vacation that affects liquidity, and you've got a lot of questions on the Fed and people are obviously focused on oil, if you're buying a stock, you're dipping a toe in here.

  2. Greg Abbott:

    As Tropical Storm Beta approaches, I call on all Texans in the Gulf Coast region to heed the advice of local officials and take the necessary precautions to keep themselves and their loved ones out of harm's way, the State of Texas is prepared to support communities in the path of the storm, where substantial amounts of rainfall and flash flooding are a significant threat. We will continue to closely monitor the storm and work collaboratively with officials to ensure our fellow Texans are safe.

  3. The HHS secretary:

    The challenge in this storm is, because of the incredible flooding that has occurred, is getting the resources to the individual, so the pharmaceutical supplies are available.

  4. Jessica Kitt:

    The zoomies offer substantial flexibility with respect to their design, for example, we can use color, size, and flickering to indicate various risks such as extreme wind speeds, rainfall, or storm surge, and those can be perceived within the ensemble.

  5. Jonathan Reiner:

    And that was really the story of the pandemic in 1918 -- the flu pandemic. We had a U-shaped curve. It was the young and the old dying for different reasons, but the reason the young died was because they had a vigorous immune response -- the so-called cytokine storm, where your body makes immunological proteins that actually cause harm.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

Storm#1#3413#10000

Translations for Storm

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

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"Storm." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 20 Jul 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/Storm>.

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