What does Speech mean?

Definitions for Speech
spitʃspeech

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word Speech.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. address, speechnoun

    the act of delivering a formal spoken communication to an audience

    "he listened to an address on minor Roman poets"

  2. speech, speech communication, spoken communication, spoken language, language, voice communication, oral communicationnoun

    (language) communication by word of mouth

    "his speech was garbled"; "he uttered harsh language"; "he recorded the spoken language of the streets"

  3. speechnoun

    something spoken

    "he could hear them uttering merry speeches"

  4. speechnoun

    the exchange of spoken words

    "they were perfectly comfortable together without speech"

  5. manner of speaking, speech, deliverynoun

    your characteristic style or manner of expressing yourself orally

    "his manner of speaking was quite abrupt"; "her speech was barren of southernisms"; "I detected a slight accent in his speech"

  6. lecture, speech, talking tonoun

    a lengthy rebuke

    "a good lecture was my father's idea of discipline"; "the teacher gave him a talking to"

  7. actor's line, speech, wordsnoun

    words making up the dialogue of a play

    "the actor forgot his speech"

  8. language, speechnoun

    the mental faculty or power of vocal communication

    "language sets homo sapiens apart from all other animals"

Wiktionary

  1. speechnoun

    The faculty of speech; the ability to speak or to use vocalizations to communicate.

  2. speechnoun

    A session of speaking; a long oral message given publicly usually by one person.

    The candidate made some ambitious promises in his campaign speech.

  3. Etymology: From speche, from spæc, spræc, from sprēkijō, from spereg-. Cognate with spraak, Sprache, sprog. More at speak.

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. Speechnoun

    Etymology: from speak.

    There is none comparable to the variety of instructive expressions by speech, wherewith a man alone is endowed, for the communication of his thoughts. William Holder, on Speech.

    Though our ideas are first acquired by various sensations and reflections, yet we convey them to each other by the means of certain sounds, or written marks, which we call words; and a great part of our knowledge is both obtained and communicated by these means, which are called speech. Isaac Watts.

    In speech be eight parts. Accidence.

    The acts of God to human ears
    Cannot without process of speech be told. John Milton.

    There is neither speech nor language, but their voices are heard among them. Ps. Common Prayer.

    A plague upon your epileptick visage!
    Smile you my speeches as I were a fool. William Shakespeare, K. Lear.

    The duke did of me demand
    What was the speech among the Londoners,
    Concerning the French journey. William Shakespeare.

    Speech of a man’s self ought to be seldom. Francis Bacon, Essays.

    The constant design of these orators, in all their speeches, was to drive some one particular point. Jonathan Swift.

    I, with leave of speech implor’d, reply’d. John Milton.

Wikipedia

  1. Speech

    Speech is a human vocal communication using language. Each language uses phonetic combinations of vowel and consonant sounds that form the sound of its words (that is, all English words sound different from all French words, even if they are the same word, e.g., "role" or "hotel"), and using those words in their semantic character as words in the lexicon of a language according to the syntactic constraints that govern lexical words' function in a sentence. In speaking, speakers perform many different intentional speech acts, e.g., informing, declaring, asking, persuading, directing, and can use enunciation, intonation, degrees of loudness, tempo, and other non-representational or paralinguistic aspects of vocalization to convey meaning. In their speech, speakers also unintentionally communicate many aspects of their social position such as sex, age, place of origin (through accent), physical states (alertness and sleepiness, vigor or weakness, health or illness), psychological states (emotions or moods), physico-psychological states (sobriety or drunkenness, normal consciousness and trance states), education or experience, and the like. Although people ordinarily use speech in dealing with other persons (or animals), when people swear they do not always mean to communicate anything to anyone, and sometimes in expressing urgent emotions or desires they use speech as a quasi-magical cause, as when they encourage a player in a game to do or warn them not to do something. There are also many situations in which people engage in solitary speech. People talk to themselves sometimes in acts that are a development of what some psychologists (e.g., Lev Vygotsky) have maintained is the use of silent speech in an interior monologue to vivify and organize cognition, sometimes in the momentary adoption of a dual persona as self addressing self as though addressing another person. Solo speech can be used to memorize or to test one's memorization of things, and in prayer or in meditation (e.g., the use of a mantra). Researchers study many different aspects of speech: speech production and speech perception of the sounds used in a language, speech repetition, speech errors, the ability to map heard spoken words onto the vocalizations needed to recreate them, which plays a key role in children's enlargement of their vocabulary, and what different areas of the human brain, such as Broca's area and Wernicke's area, underlie speech. Speech is the subject of study for linguistics, cognitive science, communication studies, psychology, computer science, speech pathology, otolaryngology, and acoustics. Speech compares with written language, which may differ in its vocabulary, syntax, and phonetics from the spoken language, a situation called diglossia. The evolutionary origins of speech are unknown and subject to much debate and speculation. While animals also communicate using vocalizations, and trained apes such as Washoe and Kanzi can use simple sign language, no animals' vocalizations are articulated phonemically and syntactically, and do not constitute speech.

ChatGPT

  1. speech

    Speech is a form of human communication using spoken language. It involves the vocal production of sounds, usually in a structured and conventional way, to convey a particular meaning or message. This process includes articulation, voice production, fluency, and language skills involving vocabulary, grammar, and syntax.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Speechnoun

    the faculty of uttering articulate sounds or words; the faculty of expressing thoughts by words or articulate sounds; the power of speaking

  2. Speechnoun

    he act of speaking; that which is spoken; words, as expressing ideas; language; conversation

  3. Speechnoun

    a particular language, as distinct from others; a tongue; a dialect

  4. Speechnoun

    talk; mention; common saying

  5. Speechnoun

    formal discourse in public; oration; harangue

  6. Speechnoun

    ny declaration of thoughts

  7. Speech

    to make a speech; to harangue

Wikidata

  1. Speech

    Speech is the vocalized form of human communication. It is based upon the syntactic combination of lexicals and names that are drawn from very large vocabularies. Each spoken word is created out of the phonetic combination of a limited set of vowel and consonant speech sound units. These vocabularies, the syntax which structures them, and their set of speech sound units differ, creating the existence of many thousands of different types of mutually unintelligible human languages. Most human speakers are able to communicate in two or more of them. The vocal abilities that enable humans to produce speech also provide humans with the ability to sing. A gestural form of human communication exists for the deaf in the form of sign language. Speech in some cultures has become the basis of a written language, often one that differs in its vocabulary, syntax and phonetics from its associated spoken one, a situation called diglossia. Speech in addition to its use in communication, it is suggested by some psychologists such as Vygotsky is internally used by mental processes to enhance and organize cognition in the form of an interior monologue.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Speech

    spēch, n. that which is spoken: language: the power of speaking: manner of speech, oration: any declaration of thoughts: mention: colloquy: conference.—ns. Speech′-craft, the science of language: the gift of speech; Speech′-crī′er, one who hawked the broadsides containing the dying speeches of persons executed, once common; Speech′-day, the public day at the close of a school year.—adj. Speech′ful, loquacious.—ns. Speechificā′tion, the act of making harangues; Speech′ifīer.—v.i. Speech′ify, to make speeches, harangue (implying contempt).—adj. Speech′less, destitute or deprived of the power of speech.—adv. Speech′lessly.—ns. Speech′lessness; Speech′-māk′er, one accustomed to speak in public; Speech′-māk′ing, a formal speaking before an assembly; Speech′-read′ing, the art of following spoken words by observing the speaker's lips, as taught to deaf-mutes. [A.S. spǽc, sprǽc; Ger. sprache.]

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Speech

    Communication through a system of conventional vocal symbols.

Editors Contribution

  1. speech

    The faculty or act of speaking.

    His speech and language developed at such a fast pace to his peers.


    Submitted by MaryC on January 12, 2020  


  2. speech

    To express how we feel using words and language.

    They decided a wedding speech was not necessary as they chose for everyone to come to the wedding and enjoy themselves, have fun, feel the love and unity and dance the night away.


    Submitted by MaryC on April 9, 2020  

Suggested Resources

  1. speech

    Song lyrics by speech -- Explore a large variety of song lyrics performed by speech on the Lyrics.com website.

Surnames Frequency by Census Records

  1. SPEECH

    According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Speech is ranked #91625 in terms of the most common surnames in America.

    The Speech surname appeared 201 times in the 2010 census and if you were to sample 100,000 people in the United States, approximately 0 would have the surname Speech.

    85.5% or 172 total occurrences were Black.
    8.4% or 17 total occurrences were White.
    3.9% or 8 total occurrences were of Hispanic origin.

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Speech' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #1308

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Speech' in Written Corpus Frequency: #2059

  3. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Speech' in Nouns Frequency: #532

How to pronounce Speech?

How to say Speech in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of Speech in Chaldean Numerology is: 2

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of Speech in Pythagorean Numerology is: 2

Examples of Speech in a Sentence

  1. Schuyler Moore:

    Her position would no doubt be that her tweet was First Amendment rights and that they can’t control what she does outside work, this wasn’t a sexual harassment claim and that this was just her speaking her mind. That it was not a violation of her morality clause because it requires actions, not speech.

  2. The Archdiocese of Chicago:

    There is no place in American life for discriminatory rhetoric of any kind, at a time when hate crimes are on the rise, when religious believers are murdered in their places of worship, we cannot countenance any speech that dehumanizes persons on the basis of ethnicity, religious belief, economic status or country of origin.

  3. Raphael WarnockThe:

    This time in which we feel like we are living in exile, a land made strange by a pandemic the likes of which no one living has ever seen. A land made strange by an economic turn down. A land made strange by a kind of political speech and rhetoric that continues to reach new lows. A land made strange when we witnessed the unthinkable as the very house of the people was attacked by those who are driven by the worst impulses, stirred up by demagogues, this strange time of exile, this strange time of spiritual exhaustion, this strange time in which the soul of our nation hangs in the balance.

  4. Nitsana Darshan-Leitner:

    There is a difference between freedom of expression and hate speech, there is no place for hate speech on campus. If she was attacking gays or Hispanics, there would be no tolerance for that.

  5. Randy Frederick:

    There is some optimism after Yellen's speech, she has raised the prospect of a December rate hike pretty high because the issues the Fed listed at its last meeting for not raising aren't going to go away in the next six weeks.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

Speech#1#2557#10000

Translations for Speech

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

Get even more translations for Speech »

Translation

Find a translation for the Speech definition in other languages:

Select another language:

  • - Select -
  • 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified)
  • 繁體中文 (Chinese - Traditional)
  • Español (Spanish)
  • Esperanto (Esperanto)
  • 日本語 (Japanese)
  • Português (Portuguese)
  • Deutsch (German)
  • العربية (Arabic)
  • Français (French)
  • Русский (Russian)
  • ಕನ್ನಡ (Kannada)
  • 한국어 (Korean)
  • עברית (Hebrew)
  • Gaeilge (Irish)
  • Українська (Ukrainian)
  • اردو (Urdu)
  • Magyar (Hungarian)
  • मानक हिन्दी (Hindi)
  • Indonesia (Indonesian)
  • Italiano (Italian)
  • தமிழ் (Tamil)
  • Türkçe (Turkish)
  • తెలుగు (Telugu)
  • ภาษาไทย (Thai)
  • Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese)
  • Čeština (Czech)
  • Polski (Polish)
  • Bahasa Indonesia (Indonesian)
  • Românește (Romanian)
  • Nederlands (Dutch)
  • Ελληνικά (Greek)
  • Latinum (Latin)
  • Svenska (Swedish)
  • Dansk (Danish)
  • Suomi (Finnish)
  • فارسی (Persian)
  • ייִדיש (Yiddish)
  • հայերեն (Armenian)
  • Norsk (Norwegian)
  • English (English)

Word of the Day

Would you like us to send you a FREE new word definition delivered to your inbox daily?

Please enter your email address:


Citation

Use the citation below to add this definition to your bibliography:

Style:MLAChicagoAPA

"Speech." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 1 Mar. 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/Speech>.

Discuss these Speech definitions with the community:

0 Comments

    Are we missing a good definition for Speech? Don't keep it to yourself...

    Image or illustration of

    Speech

    Credit »

    Free, no signup required:

    Add to Chrome

    Get instant definitions for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

    Free, no signup required:

    Add to Firefox

    Get instant definitions for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

    Browse Definitions.net

    Quiz

    Are you a words master?

    »
    anything that provides inspiration for later work
    • A. germ
    • B. elan
    • C. vigorish
    • D. canopy

    Nearby & related entries:

    Alternative searches for Speech: