What does River mean?

Definitions for River
ˈrɪv ərriv·er

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word River.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. rivernoun

    a large natural stream of water (larger than a creek)

    "the river was navigable for 50 miles"

Wiktionary

  1. rivernoun

    A large and often winding stream which drains a land mass, carrying water down from higher areas to a lower point, ending at an ocean or in an inland sea. Occasionally rivers overflow their banks and cause floods.

  2. rivernoun

    Any large flow of a liquid in a single body (e.g., 'a river of blood').

  3. rivernoun

    The last card dealt in a hand.

  4. riververb

    To improve one's hand to beat another player on the final card in a poker game.

    Johnny rivered me by drawing that Ace of spades

  5. Etymology: From riviere, from *, from riparius, from riparia, from ripa, from rei-.

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. Rivernoun

    A land current of water bigger than a brook.

    Etymology: riviere, Fr. rivus, Lat.

    It is a most beautiful country, being stored throughout with many goodly rivers, replenished with all sorts of fish. Edmund Spenser.

    The first of these rivers has been celebrated by the Latin poets for the gentleness of its course, as the other for its rapidity. Joseph Addison, Remarks on Italy.

Wikipedia

  1. River

    A river is a natural flowing watercourse, usually freshwater stream, flowing on the surface or inside underground caves towards another waterbody at a lower elevation, such as an ocean, sea, bay, lake, wetland or another river. In some cases, a river flows into the ground or becomes dry at the end of its course without reaching another body of water. Small rivers can be referred to using names such as creek, brook, rivulet and rill. There are no official definitions for the generic term river as applied to geographic features, although in some countries or communities a stream is defined by its size. Many names for small rivers are specific to geographic location; examples are "run" in some parts of the United States, "burn" in Scotland and Northeast England, and "beck" in Northern England. Sometimes a river is defined as being larger than a creek, but not always: the language is vague. Rivers are an important part of the water cycle. Water from a drainage basin generally collects into a river through surface runoff from precipitation, meltwater released from natural ice and snowpacks, and other underground sources such as groundwater recharge and springs. Rivers are often considered major features within a landscape; however, they actually only cover around 0.1% of the land on Earth. Rivers are significant to mankind since many human settlements and civilizations are built around sizeable rivers and streams. Most of the major cities of the world are situated on the banks of rivers, as they are (or were) depended upon as a vital source of drinking water, for food supply via fishing and agricultural irrigation, for shipping, as natural borders and/or defensive terrains, as a source of hydropower to drive machinery or generate electricity, for bathing, and as a means of disposing of waste. In the pre-industrial era, larger rivers were a major obstacle to movement of people, goods, and armies across regions. Towns often developed at the few locations suitable for fording, to build bridges or to support ports, and many major cities such as London are located at the narrowest and most reliable site at which a river could be crossed via bridges or ferries.In Earth science disciplines, potamology is the scientific study of rivers, while limnology is the study of inland waters in general.

ChatGPT

  1. river

    A river is a large, natural flowing watercourse, usually formed by the accumulation of water from precipitation, such as rain or snowmelt, that typically moves towards a sea, ocean, lake, or another river.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Rivernoun

    one who rives or splits

  2. Rivernoun

    a large stream of water flowing in a bed or channel and emptying into the ocean, a sea, a lake, or another stream; a stream larger than a rivulet or brook

  3. Rivernoun

    fig.: A large stream; copious flow; abundance; as, rivers of blood; rivers of oil

  4. Riververb

    to hawk by the side of a river; to fly hawks at river fowl

  5. Etymology: [F. rivre a river, LL. riparia river, bank of a river, fr. L. riparius belonging to a bank or shore, fr. ripa a bank or shore; of uncertain origin. Cf. Arrive, Riparian.]

Wikidata

  1. River

    A river is a natural watercourse, usually freshwater, flowing towards an ocean, a lake, a sea, or another river. In a few cases, a river simply flows into the ground or dries up completely at the end of its course, and does not reach another body of water. Small rivers may be called by several other names, including stream, creek, brook, rivulet, and rill. There are no official definitions for generic terms, such as river, as applied to geographic features, although in some countries or communities a stream may be defined by its size. Many names for small rivers are specific to geographic location; examples are "run" in the United States, "burn" in Scotland and northeast England, and "beck" in northern England. Sometimes a river is defined as being larger than a creek, but not always: the language is vague. Rivers are part of the hydrological cycle. Water generally collects in a river from precipitation through a drainage basin from surface runoff and other sources such as groundwater recharge, springs, and the release of stored water in natural ice and snowpacks. Potamology is the scientific study of rivers while limnology is the study of inland waters in general.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. River

    riv′ėr, n. a large running stream of water.—adj. Riv′erain, riparian.—ns. Riv′er-bank, the bank of a river; Riv′er-bās′in, the whole region drained by a river and its affluents; Riv′er-bed, the channel in which a river flows; Riv′er-birch, the red birch; Riv′er-bott′om, the alluvial land along the margin of a river; Riv′er-carp, the common carp; Riv′er-chub, the horny-head or jerker; Riv′er-course, the bed of a river; Riv′er-crab, a fresh-water crab; Riv′er-craft, small vessels which ply on rivers; Riv′er-cray′fish, a crayfish proper; Riv′er-dol′phin, a Gangetic dolphin; Riv′er-drag′on (Milt.), a crocodile; Riv′er-duck, a fresh-water duck; Riv′eret, Riv′erling, a small river; Riv′er-flat, alluvial land along a river; Riv′er-god, the tutelary deity of a river; Riv′er-head, the spring of a river; Riv′er-hog, the capybara; Riv′er-horse, the hippopotamus.—adj. Riv′erine, pertaining to, or resembling, a river.—ns. Riv′er-jack, the common water-snake of Europe; Riv′er-man, one who makes his livelihood by dragging the river for sunken goods; River-muss′el, a fresh-water mussel; Riv′er-ott′er, the common European otter; Riv′er-perch, a Californian surf-fish; Riv′er-pie, the water-ousel; Riv′er-shore, the shore or bank of a river; Riv′er-side, the bank of a river; Riv′er-smelt, the gudgeon; Riv′er-snail, a pond snail; Riv′er-swall′ow, the sand-martin; Riv′er-tide, the tide from the sea rising or ebbing in a river; Riv′er-tor′toise, a soft-shelled turtle; Riv′er-wall, a wall made to confine the waters of a river within definite bounds.—adj. Riv′ery, pertaining to rivers, like rivers. [Fr. rivière (It. riviera, shore, river)—Low L. riparia, a shore district—L. ripa, a bank.]

Editors Contribution

  1. river

    A body of water.

    The river brings much freedom and joy to the children during the various seasons.


    Submitted by MaryC on March 17, 2020  

Suggested Resources

  1. river

    Song lyrics by river -- Explore a large variety of song lyrics performed by river on the Lyrics.com website.

Surnames Frequency by Census Records

  1. RIVER

    According to the U.S. Census Bureau, River is ranked #26313 in terms of the most common surnames in America.

    The River surname appeared 928 times in the 2010 census and if you were to sample 100,000 people in the United States, approximately 0 would have the surname River.

    52.3% or 486 total occurrences were White.
    28.7% or 267 total occurrences were of Hispanic origin.
    12.2% or 114 total occurrences were Black.
    2.8% or 26 total occurrences were Asian.
    2.6% or 25 total occurrences were of two or more races.
    1% or 10 total occurrences were American Indian or Alaskan Native.

Matched Categories

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'River' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #1050

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'River' in Written Corpus Frequency: #1850

  3. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'River' in Nouns Frequency: #389

How to pronounce River?

How to say River in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of River in Chaldean Numerology is: 7

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of River in Pythagorean Numerology is: 9

Examples of River in a Sentence

  1. Colby Pellegrino:

    But( the pumping station) coming online is also a symbol of how serious the situation is on Colorado River right now, reservoir levels are lower than they've ever been in both Lake Powell and Lake Mead since the time that they filled.

  2. Mark Leary:

    If we're not able to travel on the river, we're all 100 percent dependent on air travel, which is hugely expensive.

  3. Viking Cruises Chairman Torstein Hagen:

    We are excited about the prospect of bringing modern river cruising to the Mississippi.

  4. Christopher Darlington Morley:

    Time is a flowing river. Happy those who allow themselves to be carried, unresisting, with the current. They float through easy days. They live, unquestioning, in the moment.

  5. Eugene Kabambi:

    We are searching for as many as 100 people in the Congo River as well as assisting these people with body bags, medical kit, one of the boats was totally destroyed and that is the one we believe was carrying the missing.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

River#1#1027#10000

Translations for River

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"River." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 28 Feb. 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/River>.

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