What does Revenue mean?

Definitions for Revenue
ˈrɛv ənˌyu, -əˌnurev·enue

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word Revenue.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. gross, revenue, receiptsnoun

    the entire amount of income before any deductions are made

  2. tax income, taxation, tax revenue, revenuenoun

    government income due to taxation

Wiktionary

  1. revenuenoun

    The income returned by an investment

  2. revenuenoun

    The total income received from a given source

  3. revenuenoun

    All income generated for some political entity's treasury by taxation and other means

  4. revenuenoun

    The total sales; turnover.

  5. revenuenoun

    The net revenue, net sales.

  6. Etymology: Recorded in English from 1433, "income from property or possessions", from revenue, from "a return" (modern French 'revenu'), the prop. feminine past participle of revenir (=modern French), from revenire, from re- + venire

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. Revenuenoun

    Income; annual profits received from lands or other funds.

    Etymology: revenu, Fr.

    They privily send over unto them the revenues, wherewith they are there maintained. Edmund Spenser, State of Ireland.

    She bears a duke’s revenues on her back,
    And in her heart scorns our poverty. William Shakespeare, Hen. VI.

    Only I retain
    The name and all th’ addition to a king;
    The sway, revenue, beloved sons, be yours. William Shakespeare.

    Many offices are of so small revenue, as not to furnish a man with what is sufficient for the support of his life. William Temple.

    If the woman could have been contented with golden eggs, she might have kept that revenue on still. Roger L'Estrange.

    His vassals easy, and the owner blest,
    They pay a trifle, and enjoy the rest:
    Not so a nation’s revenues are paid;
    The servant’s faults are on the master laid. Jonathan Swift.

ChatGPT

  1. revenue

    Revenue is the total amount of income or earnings generated by the sale of goods or services related to a company's primary operations. It is also referred to as "sales" or "turnover" and serves as the starting point for a company's income statement which is then reduced by expenses to calculate profit or loss.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Revenuenoun

    that which returns, or comes back, from an investment; the annual rents, profits, interest, or issues of any species of property, real or personal; income

  2. Revenuenoun

    hence, return; reward; as, a revenue of praise

  3. Revenuenoun

    the annual yield of taxes, excise, customs, duties, rents, etc., which a nation, state, or municipality collects and receives into the treasury for public use

  4. Etymology: [F. revenu, OF. revenue, fr. revenir to return, L. revenire; pref. re- re- + venire to come. See Come.]

Wikidata

  1. Revenue

    In business, revenue or turnover is income that a company receives from its normal business activities, usually from the sale of goods and services to customers. In many countries, such as the United Kingdom, revenue is referred to as turnover. Some companies receive revenue from interest, royalties, or other fees. Revenue may refer to business income in general, or it may refer to the amount, in a monetary unit, received during a period of time, as in "Last year, Company X had revenue of $42 million." Profits or net income generally imply total revenue minus total expenses in a given period. In accounting, revenue is often referred to as the "top line" due to its position on the income statement at the very top. This is to be contrasted with the "bottom line" which denotes net income. For non-profit organizations, annual revenue may be referred to as gross receipts. This revenue includes donations from individuals and corporations, support from government agencies, income from activities related to the organization's mission, and income from fundraising activities, membership dues, and financial investments such as stock shares in companies. In general usage, revenue is income received by an organization in the form of cash or cash equivalents. Sales revenue or revenues is income received from selling goods or services over a period of time. Tax revenue is income that a government receives from taxpayers.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Revenue

    rev′en-ū (earlier rē-ven′ū), n. the receipts or rents from any source: return, as a revenue of praise: income: the income of a state.—n. Rev′enue-cut′ter, an armed vessel employed by custom-house officers in preventing smuggling.—adj. Rev′enued.—ns. Rev′enue-en′sign, a distinctive flag authorised in 1798 in United States; Rev′enue-off′icer, an officer of the customs or excise; In′land-rev′enue, revenue derived from stamps, excise, income-tax, &c. [Fr. revenue, pa.p. of revenir, to return—L. revenīrere-, back, venīre, to come.]

Dictionary of Nautical Terms

  1. revenue

    In cases of revenue proceedings, the law harshly provides that the onus probandi is to be on the claimant, however injured.

Editors Contribution

  1. revenue

    An amount of income.

    Government generates its own revenue and apportions it to various elements of society.


    Submitted by MaryC on March 7, 2020  

Matched Categories

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Revenue' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #2569

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Revenue' in Written Corpus Frequency: #2434

  3. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Revenue' in Nouns Frequency: #877

How to pronounce Revenue?

How to say Revenue in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of Revenue in Chaldean Numerology is: 7

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of Revenue in Pythagorean Numerology is: 9

Examples of Revenue in a Sentence

  1. Vittorio Colao:

    We have reached an important turning point for the group with a return to organic growth in service revenue and EBITDA (core earnings) in the first half.

  2. Thomas Sedran:

    The details, the concrete conditions, how many cents per mile are we talking about or what's the share of revenue? That's still open, at this stage, we are still working on making that technology generate revenue.

  3. Marcus Weldon:

    It's not clear yet whether the overall pie of available revenue will be bigger, or if we'll be fighting with new entrants for a similar-sized pie.

  4. R "Ray" Wang:

    If 20% of your revenue is not an insight stream by 2020, you won’t have a digital biz model." (2014)

  5. Jeff Navin:

    Some of the biggest national security questions facing the country run through Piketon and Kemmerer, a Post-Soviet dealAmerican reliance on foreign enriched uranium echoes its competitive disadvantages on microchips and the critical minerals used to make electric batteries — two essential components of the global energy transition.But in the case of uranium enrichment, United States once had an advantage and chose to give it up.In the 1950s, as the nuclear era began in earnest, Piketon became the site of one of two enormous enrichment facilities in the Ohio River Valley region, where a process called gaseous diffusion was used.Meanwhile, the Soviet Union developed centrifuges in a secret program, relying on a team of German physicists and engineers captured toward the end of World War II. Its centrifuges proved to be 20 times as energy efficient as gaseous diffusion. By the end of the Cold War, United States and Russia had roughly equal enrichment capacities, but huge differences in the cost of production.In 1993, Washington and Moscow signed an agreement, dubbed Megatons to Megawatts, in which United States purchased and imported much of Russia’s enormous glut of weapons-grade uranium, which United States then downgraded to use in power plants. This provided the U.S. with cheap fuel and Moscow with cash, and was seen as a de-escalatory gesture.But it also destroyed the profitability of America’s inefficient enrichment facilities, which were eventually shuttered. Then, instead of investing in upgraded centrifuges in United States, successive administrations kept buying from Russia.ImageA mural celebrates Piketon’s gaseous diffusion plant, long ago shuttered, and United States role in the local economy.Credit... Brian Kaiser for The New York TimesImageIn the lobby at Piketon plant, a miniature display of new centrifuges.Credit... Brian Kaiser for The New York TimesThe centrifuge plant in Piketon, operated by Centrus Energy, occupies a corner of the site of the old gaseous diffusion facility. Building United States to United States full potential would create thousands of jobs, according to Centrus Energy. And it could produce the kinds of enriched uranium needed in both current and new-age nuclear plants.Lacking Piketon’s output, plants like TerraPower’s would have to look to foreign producers, like France, that might be a more politically acceptable and reliable supplier than Russia, but would also be more expensive.TerraPower sees itself as integral to phasing out climate-warming fossil fuels in electricity. Its reactor would include a sodium-based battery that would allow the plant to ramp up electricity production on demand, offsetting fluctuations in wind or solar production elsewhere.It is part of the energy transition that coal-country senators like Mr. Manchin and John Barrasso, a Wyoming Republican, are keen to fix as they eye nuclear replacements for lost coal jobs and revenue. While Mr. Manchin in particular has complicated the Biden administration’s efforts to quicken the transition away from fossil fuels, he also pushed back against colleagues, mostly Democrats, who are skeptical of nuclear power’s role in that transition, partly because of the radioactive waste it creates.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

Revenue#1#2482#10000

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"Revenue." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 12 Jun 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/Revenue>.

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