What does Professor mean?

Definitions for Professor
prəˈfɛs ərPro·fes·sor

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word Professor.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. professor, prof(noun)

    someone who is a member of the faculty at a college or university

Wiktionary

  1. professor(Noun)

    A teacher or faculty member at a college or university.

    Etymology: From proffessur, from professor, from the past participle stem of profiteor.

  2. professor(Noun)

    A higher ranking for a teacher or faculty member at a college or university. Abbreviated Prof.

    Etymology: From proffessur, from professor, from the past participle stem of profiteor.

  3. professor(Noun)

    An honorific title for a higher ranking teacher. (Capitalised)

    Professor Plum or Prof. Plum.

    Etymology: From proffessur, from professor, from the past participle stem of profiteor.

  4. professor(Noun)

    One who professes.

    Etymology: From proffessur, from professor, from the past participle stem of profiteor.

  5. professor(Noun)

    A pianist in a saloon, brothel, etc.

    Etymology: From proffessur, from professor, from the past participle stem of profiteor.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Professor(noun)

    one who professed, or makes open declaration of, his sentiments or opinions; especially, one who makes a public avowal of his belief in the Scriptures and his faith in Christ, and thus unites himself to the visible church

    Etymology: [L., a teacher, a public teacher: cf. F. professeur. See Profess.]

  2. Professor(noun)

    one who professed, or publicly teaches, any science or branch of learning; especially, an officer in a university, college, or other seminary, whose business it is to read lectures, or instruct students, in a particular branch of learning; as a professor of theology, of botany, of mathematics, or of political economy

    Etymology: [L., a teacher, a public teacher: cf. F. professeur. See Profess.]

Freebase

  1. Professor

    A professor is a scholarly teacher; the precise meaning of the term varies by country. Literally, professor derives from Latin as a "person who professes" being usually an expert in arts or sciences, a teacher of high rank. In much of the world, including most Commonwealth nations and northern Europe professor is reserved only for the most senior academics at a university, typically a department chair, or an awarded chair specifically bestowed recognizing an individual at a university or similar institution. A professor is a highly accomplished and recognized academic, and the title is in most cases awarded only after decades of scholarly work to senior academics. In the United States and Canada the title of professor is granted to most scholars with doctorate degrees or equivalent qualifications who teach in two- and four-year colleges and universities, and is used in the titles assistant professor and associate professor, which are not considered professor-level positions elsewhere, as well as for full professors. In countries on the northern European mainland, such as the Netherlands and the Scandinavian countries, usage of professor as a legal title is limited much the same way as in most Commonwealth countries, that is, it is reserved for someone who holds a chair. In the United States, "professor" as a proper noun generally implies a person with a Ph.D. who holds a permanent position at the college or university level, regardless of rank.

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Professor' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #2017

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Professor' in Written Corpus Frequency: #2566

  3. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Professor' in Nouns Frequency: #856

How to pronounce Professor?

  1. Alex
    Alex
    US English
    Daniel
    Daniel
    British
    Karen
    Karen
    Australian
    Veena
    Veena
    Indian

How to say Professor in sign language?

  1. professor

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of Professor in Chaldean Numerology is: 9

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of Professor in Pythagorean Numerology is: 5

Examples of Professor in a Sentence

  1. Michael Schill:

    I have forcefully articulated the view that, under my leadership, we will not tolerate sexual violence at the University of Oregon. We have put in place ambitious programs aimed at educating students and staff about how to prevent sexual assaults from happening, although these issues predate my joining the university, there is no doubt that this incident was a tragedy and marked a very difficult time at UO. We have worked hard to build bridges, and I am pleased to say that I enjoy an open dialog with Professor Freyd.

  2. Eric Garcetti:

    CORONAVIRUS: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW We outweigh the risks of our situation for other goals, health benefits of connection, and normal routine. It can make people vulnerable to suggestions to bend COVID-19 safety guidelines, she said. We initially may have been fearful, but as we start to gain control we become more confident to confront situations that may have scared us. As a result, as the pandemic continues, some of us have adjusted and started to underestimate the actual threat, ignore situational hazards, and dont take COVID-19 risks as seriously. Speaking to Fox News, Dr. Collin Reiff, a psychiatrist and clinical assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry at NYU Langone Health, likened caution fatigue to swimming in the ocean. People go swimming in the ocean, a potentially dangerous place, and dont take flotation devices with them. If you dont see anyone drown, you feel fine doing it, he said. But if we hear that 100,000 people died [while swimming in the ocean], and 180,000 could drown by October, you would see more people wearing a flotation device, he said, referringto a recent report that U.S. coronavirus deaths are projected to reach 180,000 by the beginning of October unless the majority of people start wearing face masks. Reiff also hypothesized that cognitive dissonance might play a part in those who find themselves having a more lax attitude toward recommended safety precautions. Experts still recommend safety precautions such as practicing social distancing, frequent hand washing and wearing a face covering while in public. (iStock) I think some of it is fatigue, but I think another part of it is that a lot of people havent been [as directly] impacted by the novel coronavirus, he said, noting that the virus had a more direct impact on those living in cities that were hit hard at the start of the pandemic, such as New York City and Philadelphia. CORONAVIRUS INFECTS 60 UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS STUDENTS ON SPRING BREAK TRIP TO MEXICO It may not be so much fatigue but their experience with COVID [the precautions] are not convenient for me any longer.

  3. Texas President Greg Fenves:

    I empathize with the many faculty members, staffers, students and parents of students who signed petitions, sent emails and letters, and organized to ban guns from campus and especially classrooms, as a professor, I understand the deep concerns raised by so many. However, as president, I have an obligation to uphold the law.

  4. Søren Kierkegaard, Asluttende uvidenskabeligt Efterskrift:

    Alas! While the speculative honourable professor explains the entire existence has he in distraction forgotten his own name, that he is a man, purely and simply a man, not a fantastic 38 of a paragraph.

  5. Daniel Munoz:

    As a percentage of homicides, these mass killings are also accounting for more deaths. He believes its partially a byproduct of an angry and frustrated time that we are living in. Densley also said crime tends to go in waves with the 1970s and 1980s seeing a number of serial killers, the 1990s marked by school shootings and child abductions and the early 2000s dominated by concerns over terrorism. This seems to be the age of mass shootings, Densley said. EL PASO SHOOTING LEAVES 20 DEAD, 26 INJURED He and James Alan Fox, a criminologist and professor at Northeastern University, also expressed worries about the contagion effect, the focus on mass killings fueling other mass killings. These are still rare events. Clearly the risk is low but the fear is high, Fox said. What fuels contagion is fear. The mass shootings this year include the three in August in Texasand Daytonthat stirred fresh urgency,especially among Democratic presidential candidates, to restrict access to firearms. While the large death tolls attracted much of the attention, the killings inflicted a mental and physical toll on dozens of others. The database does not have a complete count of victims who were wounded, but among the three mass shootings in August alone, more than 65 people were injured. DAYTON, OHIO, SHOOTING THAT LEFT 9 DEAD, 27 HURT HALTED IN UNDER A MINUTE BY COPS WHO SHOT SUSPECT: MAYOR Daniel Munoz, 28, of Odessa, was caught in the crossfire ofthe shooting that took place between a 10-mile stretch in West Texas. He was on his way to meet a friend at a bar when he saw a gunman and the barrel of a firearm. Instinctively, he got down just as his car was sprayed with bullets. Munoz, who moved to Texas about a year ago to work in the oil industry, said he had actually been on edge since the Walmart shooting, which took place just 28 days earlier and about 300 miles (480 kilometers) away, worried that a shooting could happen anywhere at any time. He remembers calling his motherafter the El Paso shootingto encourage her to have a firearm at home or with her in case she needed to defend herself. He would say the same to friends, telling them before they went to a Walmart to bring a firearm in case they needed to protect themselves or others during an attack. BEFORE MASS SHOOTING, TEXAS GUNMAN WAS ON A LONG SPIRAL DOWN, INVESTIGATOR SAYS You cant just always assume youre safe. In that moment, as soon as the El Paso shooting happened, I was on edge.

Images & Illustrations of Professor

  1. ProfessorProfessorProfessorProfessorProfessor

Popularity rank by frequency of use

Professor#1#2001#10000

Translations for Professor

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"Professor." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2020. Web. 5 Aug. 2020. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/Professor>.

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