What does Poetry mean?

Definitions for Poetry
ˈpoʊ ɪ triPoetry

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word Poetry.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. poetry, poesy, verse(noun)

    literature in metrical form

  2. poetry(noun)

    any communication resembling poetry in beauty or the evocation of feeling

Wiktionary

  1. poetry(Noun)

    The class of literature comprising poems.

    Etymology: From ποίησις, from ποιέω.

  2. poetry(Noun)

    Composition in verse or language exhibiting conscious attention to patterns.

    Etymology: From ποίησις, from ποιέω.

  3. poetry(Noun)

    A poet's literary production

    Etymology: From ποίησις, from ποιέω.

  4. poetry(Noun)

    A 'poetical' quality, artistic and/or artfull, which appeals or stirs the imagination, in any medium

    That 'Swan Lake' choreography is poetry in motion, fitting the musical poetry of Tchaikovski's divine score well beyond the literary inspiration

    Etymology: From ποίησις, from ποιέω.

Wikipedia

  1. Poetry

    Poetry (derived from the Greek poiesis, "making") is a form of literature that uses aesthetic and rhythmic qualities of language—such as phonaesthetics, sound symbolism, and metre—to evoke meanings in addition to, or in place of, the prosaic ostensible meaning. Poetry has a long history dating back to prehistoric times with hunting poetry in Africa, and to panegyric and elegiac court poetry of the empires of the Nile, Niger, and Volta River valleys. Some of the earliest written poetry in Africa is found among the Pyramid Texts written during the 25th century BCE. The earliest Western Asian epic poetry, the Epic of Gilgamesh, was written in Sumerian. Early poems in the Eurasian continent evolved from folk songs such as the Chinese Shijing; or from a need to retell oral epics, as with the Sanskrit Vedas, the Zoroastrian Gathas, and the Homeric epics, the Iliad and the Odyssey. Ancient Greek attempts to define poetry, such as Aristotle's Poetics, focused on the uses of speech in rhetoric, drama, song, and comedy. Later attempts concentrated on features such as repetition, verse form, and rhyme, and emphasized the aesthetics which distinguish poetry from more objectively-informative prosaic writing. Poetry uses forms and conventions to suggest differential interpretation to words, or to evoke emotive responses. Devices such as assonance, alliteration, onomatopoeia, and rhythm are sometimes used to achieve musical or incantatory effects. The use of ambiguity, symbolism, irony, and other stylistic elements of poetic diction often leaves a poem open to multiple interpretations. Similarly, figures of speech such as metaphor, simile, and metonymy create a resonance between otherwise disparate images—a layering of meanings, forming connections previously not perceived. Kindred forms of resonance may exist, between individual verses, in their patterns of rhyme or rhythm. Some poetry types are specific to particular cultures and genres and respond to characteristics of the language in which the poet writes. Readers accustomed to identifying poetry with Dante, Goethe, Mickiewicz, or Rumi may think of it as written in lines based on rhyme and regular meter. There are, however, traditions, such as Biblical poetry, that use other means to create rhythm and euphony. Much modern poetry reflects a critique of poetic tradition, testing the principle of euphony itself or altogether forgoing rhyme or set rhythm. In today's increasingly globalized world, poets often adapt forms, styles, and techniques from diverse cultures and languages.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Poetry(noun)

    the art of apprehending and interpreting ideas by the faculty of imagination; the art of idealizing in thought and in expression

    Etymology: [OF. poeterie. See Poet.]

  2. Poetry(noun)

    imaginative language or composition, whether expressed rhythmically or in prose. Specifically: Metrical composition; verse; rhyme; poems collectively; as, heroic poetry; dramatic poetry; lyric or Pindaric poetry

    Etymology: [OF. poeterie. See Poet.]

Freebase

  1. Poetry

    Poetry is a form of literary art which uses aesthetic and rhythmic qualities of language—such as phonaesthetics, sound symbolism, and metre—to evoke meanings in addition to, or in place of, the prosaic ostensible meaning. Poetry has a long history, dating back to the Sumerian Epic of Gilgamesh. Early poems evolved from folk songs such as the Chinese Shijing, or from a need to retell oral epics, as with the Sanskrit Vedas, Zoroastrian Gathas, and the Homeric epics, the Iliad and the Odyssey. Ancient attempts to define poetry, such as Aristotle's Poetics, focused on the uses of speech in rhetoric, drama, song and comedy. Later attempts concentrated on features such as repetition, verse form and rhyme, and emphasized the aesthetics which distinguish poetry from more objectively-informative, prosaic forms of writing. From the mid-20th century, poetry has sometimes been more generally regarded as a fundamental creative act employing language. Poetry uses forms and conventions to suggest differential interpretation to words, or to evoke emotive responses. Devices such as assonance, alliteration, onomatopoeia and rhythm are sometimes used to achieve musical or incantatory effects. The use of ambiguity, symbolism, irony and other stylistic elements of poetic diction often leaves a poem open to multiple interpretations. Similarly, metaphor, simile and metonymy create a resonance between otherwise disparate images—a layering of meanings, forming connections previously not perceived. Kindred forms of resonance may exist, between individual verses, in their patterns of rhyme or rhythm.

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Poetry

    the gift of penetrating into the inner soul or secret of a thing, and bodying it forth rhythmically so as to captivate the imagination and the heart.

The Roycroft Dictionary

  1. poetry

    1. A substitute for the impossible. 2. The bill and coo of sex.

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Poetry

    Works that consist of literary and oral genre expressing meaning via symbolism and following formal or informal patterns.

Suggested Resources

  1. poetry

    Poetry Forms -- Read about the various poetry forms and types including definitions and examples.

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Poetry' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #3294

  2. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Poetry' in Nouns Frequency: #1409

How to pronounce Poetry?

  1. Alex
    Alex
    US English
    Daniel
    Daniel
    British
    Karen
    Karen
    Australian
    Veena
    Veena
    Indian

How to say Poetry in sign language?

  1. poetry

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of Poetry in Chaldean Numerology is: 9

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of Poetry in Pythagorean Numerology is: 9

Examples of Poetry in a Sentence

  1. Jean Cocteau:

    Poetry is indispensable --if I only knew what for.

  2. Johnson:

    Poetry cannot be translated; and, therefore, it is the poets that preserve the languages; for we would not be at the trouble to learn a language if we could have all that is written in it just as well in a translation. But as the beauties of poetry cannot be preserved in any language except that in which it was originally written, we learn the language.

  3. Yevgeny Aleksandrovich Yevtushenko:

    A poet's autobiography is his poetry. Anything else can be only a footnote.

  4. Andre Emmanuel Bendavi ben-YEHU:

    The immorality and amorality reign in the hearts of the 'leaders' of the world, political and religious; from Vatican to Canterbury, and on through their subdivisions, and through the 'Holy Tribunal of The Inquisition', DBA now as The United Nations Security Council. — Andre Emmanuel Bendavi ben-YEHU As long as governments and religious leaders function in accordance with the daily prescribed rules of ERIS and ARES, PLUTO will be working full time, enjoying the smell of the holocaust of children on the four corners of the Earth. — Andre Emmanuel Bendavi ben-YEHU Blissed are the eyes that can scan the soul of words within their breath of meaning, and reveal the colors of their images with hues of understanding. — Andre Emmanuel Bendavi ben-YEHU The mind of a Poet is a creative engine of beauty, wonders and grace to diffuse love, harmony; to learn and to teach; to instruct and defend art and the language; and to stimulate intuition and imagination. — Andre Emmanuel Bendavi ben-YEHU Poets have written the most important facts and events of our planet, and of the universe. They have been the fountain of knowledge for historians in all fields of the human culture; for philologists, linguisticians, and grammarians; — mothers, fathers and guardians — of the languages, throughout the history of Mankind. — Andre Emmanuel Bendavi ben-YEHU A Poet may express her/his natural emotions, the intergalactic wonders, or serve as an interpreter for what is possible to exist, could have existed or exists around her/his perception. — Andre Emmanuel Bendavi ben-YEHU Friends are linked by the most powerful energy of the nature of the Human Race; the energy that is the sister of Motherhood; the energy of Friendship. — Andre Emmanuel Bendavi ben-YEHU A free thinker is one that acts self directed, and learns through resourceful thoughts; that questions everything, and knows the words she/he conveys. — Andre Emmanuel Bendavi ben-YEHU Know the words that You use, — for once they are used — they will identify the true picture of one's intelligence. — Andre Emmanuel Bendavi ben-YEHU Words are the vehicle of Soul’s creation, and the voice of one’s heart. — Andre Emmanuel Bendavi ben-YEHU Inspiration is a tourist in the artistic land of hard work. — Andre Emmanuel Bendavi ben-YEHU What makes the history of a Poet is not the number of pages written, but the number of souls inspired by her or his work. — Andre Emmanuel Bendavi ben-YEHU A poem is a spice for everyone’s cerebral diet; a sublime companion, always present to ignite one’s intellectual dynamo; and to prod the heart to pump beauty.— Andre Emmanuel Bendavi ben-YEHU A poem is a precious jar of perfume that needs to be packed accordingly. — Andre Emmanuel Bendavi ben-YEHU Words can have beauty and meaning, but when they are poetized, they have the meaning of beauty. — Andre Emmanuel Bendavi ben-YEHU A Poet paints with words, and writes with mathematized forms of geometric metaphors. — Andre Emmanuel Bendavi ben-YEHU Any one can learn mathematics, music and letters, and earn a Ph.D. in Poetics, but only a Poet can learn all that, and write with syllables of love and art. — Andre Emmanuel Bendavi ben-YEHU In English, as in any other language, there are rules that one must follow. In Poetry one must follow the language’s rules, and feel free to improve any branch of the poetic art; one has license to create around, change forms, styles and concepts, but one can never forget that there is no 'poetic license' to ignore the language and its principles. — Andre Emmanuel Bendavi ben-YEHU Let mankind understand the order of the planet./It’s time for all to gather and sow seed of justice,/Before time disallows use of tools to build ships/To rescue human children from deluge of blood! http://allpoetry.com/poem/6415503 — Andre Emmanuel Bendavi ben-YEHU When we understand that we are the human race, there will be no places for Eris and Ares on this planet. — Andre Emmanuel Bendavi ben-YEHU

  5. Samuel Taylor Coleridge:

    I wish our clever young poets would remember my homely definitions of prose and poetry that is prose words in their best order-poetry the best words in the best order.

Images & Illustrations of Poetry

  1. PoetryPoetryPoetryPoetryPoetry

Popularity rank by frequency of use

Poetry#1#3049#10000

Translations for Poetry

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

Get even more translations for Poetry »

Translation

Find a translation for the Poetry definition in other languages:

Select another language:

  • - Select -
  • 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified)
  • 繁體中文 (Chinese - Traditional)
  • Español (Spanish)
  • Esperanto (Esperanto)
  • 日本語 (Japanese)
  • Português (Portuguese)
  • Deutsch (German)
  • العربية (Arabic)
  • Français (French)
  • Русский (Russian)
  • ಕನ್ನಡ (Kannada)
  • 한국어 (Korean)
  • עברית (Hebrew)
  • Український (Ukrainian)
  • اردو (Urdu)
  • Magyar (Hungarian)
  • मानक हिन्दी (Hindi)
  • Indonesia (Indonesian)
  • Italiano (Italian)
  • தமிழ் (Tamil)
  • Türkçe (Turkish)
  • తెలుగు (Telugu)
  • ภาษาไทย (Thai)
  • Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese)
  • Čeština (Czech)
  • Polski (Polish)
  • Bahasa Indonesia (Indonesian)
  • Românește (Romanian)
  • Nederlands (Dutch)
  • Ελληνικά (Greek)
  • Latinum (Latin)
  • Svenska (Swedish)
  • Dansk (Danish)
  • Suomi (Finnish)
  • فارسی (Persian)
  • ייִדיש (Yiddish)
  • հայերեն (Armenian)
  • Norsk (Norwegian)
  • English (English)

Discuss these Poetry definitions with the community:

Word of the Day

Would you like us to send you a FREE new word definition delivered to your inbox daily?

Please enter your email address:


Citation

Use the citation below to add this definition to your bibliography:

Style:MLAChicagoAPA

"Poetry." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2020. Web. 5 Jul 2020. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/Poetry>.

Are we missing a good definition for Poetry? Don't keep it to yourself...

Free, no signup required:

Add to Chrome

Get instant definitions for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

Free, no signup required:

Add to Firefox

Get instant definitions for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

Nearby & related entries:

Alternative searches for Poetry:


Thanks for your vote! We truly appreciate your support.