What does PROTEUS mean?

Definitions for PROTEUS
ˈproʊ ti əs, -tyuspro·teus

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word PROTEUS.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. Proteusnoun

    (Greek mythology) a prophetic god who served Poseidon; was capable of changing his shape at will

  2. Proteus, genus Proteusnoun

    type genus of the Proteidae

GCIDE

  1. Proteusnoun

    A genus of gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria, including some species pathogenic in man.

Wiktionary

  1. Proteusnoun

    A sea god who could change his shape at will.

  2. Proteusnoun

    The sixth satellite of the planet Neptune

  3. proteusnoun

    Any of many gram-negative bacteria, of the genus Proteus, several of which are responsible for human infections.

  4. Etymology: From Πρωτεύς.

Wikipedia

  1. Proteus

    In Greek mythology, Proteus (; Ancient Greek: Πρωτεύς, Prōteus) is an early prophetic sea-god or god of rivers and oceanic bodies of water, one of several deities whom Homer calls the "Old Man of the Sea" (hálios gérôn). Some who ascribe a specific domain to Proteus call him the god of "elusive sea change", which suggests the constantly changing nature of the sea or the liquid quality of water. He can foretell the future, but, in a mytheme familiar to several cultures, will change his shape to avoid doing so; he answers only to those who are capable of capturing him. From this feature of Proteus comes the adjective protean, meaning "versatile", "mutable", or "capable of assuming many forms". "Protean" has positive connotations of flexibility, versatility and adaptability.

ChatGPT

  1. proteus

    Proteus is a term with definitions in various fields: 1. In Greek mythology, Proteus is a sea god who is capable of shape-shifting and prophecy. 2. In microbiology, Proteus is a genus of Gram-negative Proteobacteria, known for their ability to move across surfaces and for causing urinary tract infections in humans. 3. In literature, "proteus" is often used as a metaphor to describe something that frequently changes or is variable in nature. This is derived from the mythical figure's shape-shifting ability. 4. The Proteus Effect is a psychological phenomenon where individuals behavior adapts to their digital self-representation in virtual reality. Note: The context of conversation or text needs to be considered to determine which definition is most relevant.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Proteusnoun

    a sea god in the service of Neptune who assumed different shapes at will. Hence, one who easily changes his appearance or principles

  2. Proteusnoun

    a genus of aquatic eel-shaped amphibians found in caves in Austria. They have permanent external gills as well as lungs. The eyes are small and the legs are weak

  3. Proteusnoun

    a changeable protozoan; an amoeba

  4. Etymology: [L., Gr. .]

Wikidata

  1. Proteus

    In Greek mythology, Proteus is an early sea-god, one of several deities whom Homer calls the "Old Man of the Sea". Some who ascribe to him a specific domain call him the god of "elusive sea change," which suggests the constantly changing nature of the sea or the liquid quality of water in general. He can foretell the future, but, in a mytheme familiar to several cultures, will change his shape to avoid having to; he will answer only to someone who is capable of capturing him. From this feature of Proteus comes the adjective protean, with the general meaning of "versatile", "mutable", "capable of assuming many forms". "Protean" has positive connotations of flexibility, versatility and adaptability. The earliest attested form of the name is the Mycenaean Greek

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Proteus

    See Protean.

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Proteus

    in the Greek mythology a divinity of the sea endowed with the gift of prophecy, but from whom it was difficult to extort the secrets of fate, as he immediately changed his shape when any one attempted to force him, for it was only in his proper form he could enunciate these secrets.

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Proteus

    A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that occurs in the intestines of humans and a wide variety of animals, as well as in manure, soil, and polluted waters. Its species are pathogenic, causing urinary tract infections and are also considered secondary invaders, causing septic lesions at other sites of the body.

CrunchBase

  1. Proteus

    Founded in 1996, Proteus was a pioneer in developing dynamic, scalable Internet, wireless and interactive television applications.Proteus’ first major client was Omnipoint Communications (later acquired by Voicestream & T-Mobile). Other early work focused on database driven applications for Newsweek, The Washington Post, AOL, Sony and Motorola.In late 1997, Proteus began working with Omnipoint on a first of its kind, text-messaging application allowing Omnipoint customers to push text messages to their phone from www.omnipoint.com. In 1999, Proteus teamed with Motorola to produce a suite of database driven WAP applications to coincide with the introduction of Motorola™s first WAP enabled handset, the Timeport. Perhaps the most exciting wireless milestone in Proteus’ history was the introduction of wireless interactive television during Super Bowl XXXVI. Supported by Motorola and through tight technical integration with FOX Sports, Proteus produced the first on air wireless polling application. Viewers were invited through broadcast television prompts to answer Super Bowl related questions directly from their mobile handsets. This experience lead to a rich succession of wireless milestones including:¢ The first U.S. TV to SMS application in 2002 (Cingular Wirless NASCAR Virtual Crew Chief) ¢ AT&T Wireless March Madness Game 2003 (first SMS brackets game) ¢ HBO’s first foray into mobile gaming (Sex in the City and Sopranos) ¢ News Corp’s mobile expansion into Latin America in 2006After nearly a decade of organic growth, Proteus was acquired by Telitas AG and is now owned by 2ergo Ltd. 2ergo is AIM listed on the London Stock Exchange (LSE:RGO).

Mythology

  1. Proteus

    (Pro′teus). A marine deity, who could foretell events and convert himself at will into all sorts of shapes. According to later legends, Proteus was a son of Poseidon.

    “The changeful Proteus, whose prophetic mind, The secret cause of Bacchus’ rage divined.” (The Lusiad.)

    “What chain can hold this varying Proteus fast?” (Budgell.)

Anagrams for PROTEUS »

  1. petrous

  2. posture

  3. pourest

  4. pouters

  5. spouter

  6. store up

  7. troupes

  8. proetus

  9. septuor

How to pronounce PROTEUS?

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of PROTEUS in Chaldean Numerology is: 8

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of PROTEUS in Pythagorean Numerology is: 6

Popularity rank by frequency of use

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Translations for PROTEUS

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