What does PALE mean?

Definitions for PALE
peɪlPALE

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word PALE.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. picket, pale(adj)

    a wooden strip forming part of a fence

  2. pale(adj)

    very light colored; highly diluted with white

    "pale seagreen"; "pale blue eyes"

  3. pale, pallid, wan, sick(adj)

    (of light) lacking in intensity or brightness; dim or feeble

    "the pale light of a half moon"; "a pale sun"; "the late afternoon light coming through the el tracks fell in pale oblongs on the street"; "a pallid sky"; "the pale (or wan) stars"; "the wan light of dawn"

  4. pale, pallid(adj)

    lacking in vitality or interest or effectiveness

    "a pale rendition of the aria"; "pale prose with the faint sweetness of lavender"; "a pallid performance"

  5. pale, pallid, wan(adj)

    abnormally deficient in color as suggesting physical or emotional distress

    "the pallid face of the invalid"; "her wan face suddenly flushed"

  6. pale(verb)

    not full or rich

    "high, pale, pure and lovely song"

  7. pale, blanch, blench(verb)

    turn pale, as if in fear

GCIDE

  1. Pale(n.)

    Hence: A region within specified bounds, whether or not enclosed or demarcated.

  2. Origin: [F. pal, fr. L. palus: cf. D. paal. See Pole a stake, and 1st Pallet.]

Webster Dictionary

  1. Pale(verb)

    wanting in color; not ruddy; dusky white; pallid; wan; as, a pale face; a pale red; a pale blue

  2. Pale(verb)

    not bright or brilliant; of a faint luster or hue; dim; as, the pale light of the moon

  3. Pale(noun)

    paleness; pallor

  4. Pale(verb)

    to turn pale; to lose color or luster

  5. Pale(verb)

    to make pale; to diminish the brightness of

  6. Pale(noun)

    a pointed stake or slat, either driven into the ground, or fastened to a rail at the top and bottom, for fencing or inclosing; a picket

  7. Pale(noun)

    that which incloses or fences in; a boundary; a limit; a fence; a palisade

  8. Pale(noun)

    a space or field having bounds or limits; a limited region or place; an inclosure; -- often used figuratively

  9. Pale(noun)

    a stripe or band, as on a garment

  10. Pale(noun)

    one of the greater ordinaries, being a broad perpendicular stripe in an escutcheon, equally distant from the two edges, and occupying one third of it

  11. Pale(noun)

    a cheese scoop

  12. Pale(noun)

    a shore for bracing a timber before it is fastened

  13. Pale(verb)

    to inclose with pales, or as with pales; to encircle; to encompass; to fence off

  14. Origin: [F. ple, fr. plir to turn pale, L. pallere to be or look pale. Cf. Appall, Fallow, pall, v. i., Pallid.]

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Pale

    pāl, n. a narrow piece of wood driven into the ground for use in enclosing grounds: anything that encloses or fences in: any enclosed field or space: limit: district: a broad stripe from top to bottom of a shield in heraldry.—v.t. to enclose with stakes: to encompass.—n. Palificā′tion, act of strengthening by stakes.—adj. Pal′iform.—English pale, the district in Ireland within which alone the English had power for centuries after the invasion in 1172. [Fr. pal—L. palus, a stake.]

  2. Pale

    pāl, adj. somewhat white in colour: not ruddy or fresh: wan: of a faint lustre, dim: light in colour.—v.t. to make pale.—v.i. to turn pale.—ns. Pale′-ale, a light-coloured pleasant bitter ale; Pale′buck, an antelope, the oribi.—adj. Pale′-eyed (Shak.), having the eyes dimmed.—n. Pale′-face, a white person.—adj. Pale′-heart′ed (Shak.), dispirited.—adv. Pale′ly.—n. Pale′ness.—adjs. Pale′-vis′aged (Shak.), having no colour in the face; Pā′lish, somewhat pale. [Fr.,—L. pallidus, pale.]

Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

  1. pale

    In heraldry, one of the figures known as ordinaries, consisting of a horizontal band in the middle of the shield, of which it is said to occupy one-third. Several charges of any kind are said to be “in pale” when they stand over each other horizontally, as do the three lions of England. A shield divided through the middle by a horizontal line is said to be “parted per pale.” The pallet is the diminutive of the pale, and is most generally not borne singly. Three pallets gules were the arms of Raymond, count of Provence. When the field is divided into an even number of parts by perpendicular lines, it is called “paly of” so many pieces. When divided by lines perpendicular and bendways crossing, it is called “paly bendy.” An endorse is a further diminutive of the pallet, and a pale placed between two endorses is said to be endorsed.

  2. pale

    In Irish history, means that portion of the kingdom over which the English rule and English law were acknowledged. There is so much vagueness in the meaning of the term, that a few words of explanation appear necessary. The vagueness arises from the great fluctuations which the English authority underwent in Ireland at various periods, and from the consequent fluctuation of the actual territorial limits of the Pale. The designation dates from the reign of John, who distributed the portion of Ireland then nominally subject to England into twelve counties palatine, Dublin, Meath, Kildare, Louth, Carlow, Kilkenny, Wexford, Waterford, Cork, Kerry, Tipperary, and Limerick. To this entire district, in a general way, was afterwards given the designation of the Pale. But as it may be said that the term is commonly applied by the writers of each age to the actual English territory of the period, and as this varied much, care must be taken to allude to the age of which the name Pale is used. Thus at the close of the reign of Edward III., the English law extended only to the four counties of Dublin, Carlow, Meath, and Louth. In the reign of Henry VI., the limits were still further restricted. In a general way, however, the Pale may be considered as comprising the counties of Dublin, Meath, Carlow, Kilkenny, and Louth. This, although not quite exact, will be sufficient for most purposes.

Editors Contribution

  1. pale

    A light shade of a color.

    We decided to paint the room a pale grey.

    Submitted by MaryC on August 8, 2016  

Suggested Resources

  1. PALE

    What does PALE stand for? -- Explore the various meanings for the PALE acronym on the Abbreviations.com website.

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'PALE' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #2842

  2. Adjectives Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'PALE' in Adjectives Frequency: #361

How to pronounce PALE?

  1. Alex
    Alex
    US English
    Daniel
    Daniel
    British
    Karen
    Karen
    Australian
    Veena
    Veena
    Indian

How to say PALE in sign language?

  1. pale

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of PALE in Chaldean Numerology is: 8

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of PALE in Pythagorean Numerology is: 7

Examples of PALE in a Sentence

  1. Andrew Frisch:

    This is beyond the pale, and I think it was clear.

  2. Elizabeth Barrett Browning:

    Experience, like a pale musician, holds a dulcimer of patience in his hand.

  3. Bettina Elias Siegel:

    This is really beyond the pale in terms of its aggressive marketing to kids.

  4. Horace:

    Pale death knocks with impartial foot at poor men's hovels and king's palaces.

  5. Matt Schlapp:

    At this moment, we need a conservative who speaks not in pale pastels but bold colors.

Images & Illustrations of PALE

  1. PALEPALEPALEPALEPALE

Popularity rank by frequency of use

PALE#1#9332#10000

Translations for PALE

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

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Translation

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