What does Norman mean?

Definitions for Norman
ˈnɔr mənNor·man

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word Norman.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. Norman, Jessye Norman(noun)

    United States operatic soprano (born in 1945)

  2. Norman, Greg Norman, Gregory John Norman(noun)

    Australian golfer (born in 1955)

  3. Norman(adj)

    an inhabitant of Normandy

  4. Norman(adj)

    of or relating to or characteristic of Normandy

    "Norman beaches"

  5. Norman(adj)

    of or relating to or characteristic of the Normans

    "the Norman Invasion in 1066"

Wiktionary

  1. Norman(Noun)

    A person whose ancestors are from Normandy or who resides in Normandy.

    Etymology: It is certain that the word is derived from the base of the words for north and the Germanic base of the words for man. However, given the frequent movement of Germanic groups especially into and out of Britain in the post-classical world, it is unclear in what tongue it came to be used first. In addition, the generally accepted meaning, a person from Normandy or one of the many French speaking invaders to Britain, was used chiefly by Anglo-Norman and , though it originally referred to any Scandinavian of the time. See also Northman.

  2. Norman(Noun)

    A member of the mixed Scandinavian and Frankish peoples who in the 11th century were a major military power in Western Europe and who conquered the English in 1066.

    Etymology: It is certain that the word is derived from the base of the words for north and the Germanic base of the words for man. However, given the frequent movement of Germanic groups especially into and out of Britain in the post-classical world, it is unclear in what tongue it came to be used first. In addition, the generally accepted meaning, a person from Normandy or one of the many French speaking invaders to Britain, was used chiefly by Anglo-Norman and , though it originally referred to any Scandinavian of the time. See also Northman.

  3. Norman(Noun)

    A Northman.

    Etymology: It is certain that the word is derived from the base of the words for north and the Germanic base of the words for man. However, given the frequent movement of Germanic groups especially into and out of Britain in the post-classical world, it is unclear in what tongue it came to be used first. In addition, the generally accepted meaning, a person from Normandy or one of the many French speaking invaders to Britain, was used chiefly by Anglo-Norman and , though it originally referred to any Scandinavian of the time. See also Northman.

  4. Norman(Adjective)

    Of or pertaining to Normandy or its inhabitants (present or past).

    Etymology: It is certain that the word is derived from the base of the words for north and the Germanic base of the words for man. However, given the frequent movement of Germanic groups especially into and out of Britain in the post-classical world, it is unclear in what tongue it came to be used first. In addition, the generally accepted meaning, a person from Normandy or one of the many French speaking invaders to Britain, was used chiefly by Anglo-Norman and , though it originally referred to any Scandinavian of the time. See also Northman.

  5. Norman(Adjective)

    Relating to the Norman language.

    Norman vocabulary

    Etymology: It is certain that the word is derived from the base of the words for north and the Germanic base of the words for man. However, given the frequent movement of Germanic groups especially into and out of Britain in the post-classical world, it is unclear in what tongue it came to be used first. In addition, the generally accepted meaning, a person from Normandy or one of the many French speaking invaders to Britain, was used chiefly by Anglo-Norman and , though it originally referred to any Scandinavian of the time. See also Northman.

  6. Norman(Adjective)

    Referring to the dialect of French spoken in Normandy.

    Etymology: It is certain that the word is derived from the base of the words for north and the Germanic base of the words for man. However, given the frequent movement of Germanic groups especially into and out of Britain in the post-classical world, it is unclear in what tongue it came to be used first. In addition, the generally accepted meaning, a person from Normandy or one of the many French speaking invaders to Britain, was used chiefly by Anglo-Norman and , though it originally referred to any Scandinavian of the time. See also Northman.

  7. Norman(Adjective)

    Relating to the Romanesque architecture developed by the Normans after the Norman Conquest, characterized by large arches and heavy columns.

    Etymology: It is certain that the word is derived from the base of the words for north and the Germanic base of the words for man. However, given the frequent movement of Germanic groups especially into and out of Britain in the post-classical world, it is unclear in what tongue it came to be used first. In addition, the generally accepted meaning, a person from Normandy or one of the many French speaking invaders to Britain, was used chiefly by Anglo-Norman and , though it originally referred to any Scandinavian of the time. See also Northman.

  8. Norman(ProperNoun)

    The langue d'oïl variant, closely related to the French of "Ile de France" (i.e. Paris), spoken in Normandy and the Channel Islands, which influenced the development of Quebec French (until the mid 20th century), and was for several centuries the ruling language of England (see Anglo-Norman).

    Etymology: It is certain that the word is derived from the base of the words for north and the Germanic base of the words for man. However, given the frequent movement of Germanic groups especially into and out of Britain in the post-classical world, it is unclear in what tongue it came to be used first. In addition, the generally accepted meaning, a person from Normandy or one of the many French speaking invaders to Britain, was used chiefly by Anglo-Norman and , though it originally referred to any Scandinavian of the time. See also Northman.

  9. Norman(ProperNoun)

    used in the Middle Ages and revived in the 19th century.

    Etymology: It is certain that the word is derived from the base of the words for north and the Germanic base of the words for man. However, given the frequent movement of Germanic groups especially into and out of Britain in the post-classical world, it is unclear in what tongue it came to be used first. In addition, the generally accepted meaning, a person from Normandy or one of the many French speaking invaders to Britain, was used chiefly by Anglo-Norman and , though it originally referred to any Scandinavian of the time. See also Northman.

  10. Norman(ProperNoun)

    The langue d'oïl variant, closely related to the French of "Ile de France", spoken in Normandy and the Channel Islands, and was for several centuries the ruling language of England.

    Etymology: From Middle English Norman, from Old English Norman (a variant of Norþman) and Old French Normant. It is certain that the word is derived from the base of the Germanic words for north and the Germanic base of the words for man. However, given the frequent movement of Germanic groups especially into and out of Britain in the post-classical world, it is unclear in what tongue it came to be used first. In addition, the generally accepted meaning, a person from Normandy or one of the many French speaking invaders to Britain, was used chiefly by Anglo-Norman and Old French , though it originally referred to any Scandinavian of the time. See also Northman.

  11. Norman(ProperNoun)

    A surname, for someone from Normandy, or for a Viking.

    Etymology: From Middle English Norman, from Old English Norman (a variant of Norþman) and Old French Normant. It is certain that the word is derived from the base of the Germanic words for north and the Germanic base of the words for man. However, given the frequent movement of Germanic groups especially into and out of Britain in the post-classical world, it is unclear in what tongue it came to be used first. In addition, the generally accepted meaning, a person from Normandy or one of the many French speaking invaders to Britain, was used chiefly by Anglo-Norman and Old French , though it originally referred to any Scandinavian of the time. See also Northman.

  12. Norman(ProperNoun)

    A male given name from Old English used in the Middle Ages and revived in the 19th century.

    "Let him be named Norman", said the lady; "it was the name of him who last - it was the name of the youngest son of Macalbin."

    Etymology: From Middle English Norman, from Old English Norman (a variant of Norþman) and Old French Normant. It is certain that the word is derived from the base of the Germanic words for north and the Germanic base of the words for man. However, given the frequent movement of Germanic groups especially into and out of Britain in the post-classical world, it is unclear in what tongue it came to be used first. In addition, the generally accepted meaning, a person from Normandy or one of the many French speaking invaders to Britain, was used chiefly by Anglo-Norman and Old French , though it originally referred to any Scandinavian of the time. See also Northman.

  13. Norman(ProperNoun)

    A city, the county seat of Cleveland County, Oklahoma, United States

    Etymology: From Middle English Norman, from Old English Norman (a variant of Norþman) and Old French Normant. It is certain that the word is derived from the base of the Germanic words for north and the Germanic base of the words for man. However, given the frequent movement of Germanic groups especially into and out of Britain in the post-classical world, it is unclear in what tongue it came to be used first. In addition, the generally accepted meaning, a person from Normandy or one of the many French speaking invaders to Britain, was used chiefly by Anglo-Norman and Old French , though it originally referred to any Scandinavian of the time. See also Northman.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Norman(noun)

    a wooden bar, or iron pin

    Etymology: [F. normand.]

  2. Norman(adj)

    of or pertaining to Normandy or to the Normans; as, the Norman language; the Norman conquest

    Etymology: [F. normand.]

  3. Norman(noun)

    a native or inhabitant of Normandy; originally, one of the Northmen or Scandinavians who conquered Normandy in the 10th century; afterwards, one of the mixed (Norman-French) race which conquered England, under William the Conqueror

    Etymology: [F. normand.]

Freebase

  1. Norman

    Norman is a city in the state of Oklahoma that is located 20 miles south of downtown Oklahoma City. It is part of the Oklahoma City metropolitan area. With a full-time population of 110,925 as of the 2010 census, Norman is the third-largest city in Oklahoma and the 235th-largest city in the United States. The city serves as the county seat of Cleveland County. Norman was settled during the Land Run of 1889, which opened the former Indian Territory and Unassigned Lands to American pioneer settlement. The city was named in honor of its first land surveyor, Abner Norman, and was formally incorporated on May 13, 1891. Today the city is known for its higher education and related research industries. Norman is home to the University of Oklahoma, the largest university in the state with approximately 30,000 students enrolled. The university is well known for its sporting events, with over 80,000 people routinely attending football games. The university is also home to several museums including the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, which contains the largest collection of French Impressionist art ever given to an American university. The National Weather Center, located in Norman, houses a unique collection of university, state, and federal organizations that work together to improve the understanding of events related to the Earth's atmosphere. Norman lies within Tornado Alley, a geographic region where tornadic activity is predominant. The Oklahoma City metropolitan area, including Norman, is the most tornado-prone area in the United States. In addition to this, the SPC or Storm Prediction Center, a branch of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, is located in Norman due to its location. The facility is used for forecasting severe storm and tornado outbreaks in addition to housing various experimental weather radars.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Norman

    nor′man, n. a native or inhabitant of Normandy: one of that Scandinavian race which settled in northern France about the beginning of the 10th century, founded the Duchy of Normandy, and conquered England in 1066—the Norman Conquest.—adj. pertaining to the Normans or to Normandy.—v.t. Nor′manise, to give a Norman character to.—Norman architecture, a round-arched style, a variety of Romanesque, prevalent in England from the Norman Conquest (1066) till the end of the 12th century, of massive simplicity, the churches cruciform with semicircular apse and a great tower rising from the intersection of nave and transept, deeply recessed doorways, windows small, round-headed, high in wall; Norman French, a form of French spoken by the Normans, which came into England at the Norman Conquest, modified the spelling, accent, and pronunciation of Anglo-Saxon, and enriched it with a large infusion of new words relating to the arts of life, &c. [Northmen.]

  2. Norman

    nor′man, n. (naut.) a bar inserted in a windlass, on which to fasten or veer a rope or cable.

Dictionary of Nautical Terms

  1. norman

    A short wooden bar thrust into one of the holes of the windlass or capstan in a merchantman, whereon to veer a rope or fasten the cable, if there be little strain upon it. Also fixed through the head of the rudder, in some ships, to prevent the loss of the rudder. Also, a pin placed in the bitt-cross-piece to confine the cable from falling off.

Suggested Resources

  1. norman

    Song lyrics by norman -- Explore a large variety of song lyrics performed by norman on the Lyrics.com website.

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Norman' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #4033

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Norman' in Written Corpus Frequency: #3796

How to pronounce Norman?

  1. Alex
    Alex
    US English
    Daniel
    Daniel
    British
    Karen
    Karen
    Australian
    Veena
    Veena
    Indian

How to say Norman in sign language?

  1. norman

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of Norman in Chaldean Numerology is: 6

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of Norman in Pythagorean Numerology is: 3

Examples of Norman in a Sentence

  1. Jimmy Kimmel:

    The fact that a group of Oscar winners eagerly agreed to play these iconic characters is a testament to the greatness of these shows and their creator, Norman Lear, to be a part of this is a dream come true for me and for everyone involved.

  2. Anthony Sadler:

    The three of us beat up the guy, i begin to tie him up with help from Chris (Norman), another passenger.

  3. Norman Pearlstine:

    I believe many men, under similar circumstances, have shared my preference for silence while encouraging women to assert their reproductive rights, while eschewing opinion, I believe burying the facts is neither moral nor noble in the face of heated emotions and recent efforts to make abortion again illegal. I think it important to remind Norman Pearlstine and to tell others what life was like before Roe vs. Wade.

  4. P. G. Wodehouse:

    The village of Market Blandings is one of those sleepy hamlets which modern progress has failed to touch... The church is Norman, and the intelligence of the majority of the natives palaeozoic.

  5. Norman Seabrook:

    Norman Seabrook got paid.

Images & Illustrations of Norman

  1. NormanNormanNormanNormanNorman

Popularity rank by frequency of use

Norman#1#6137#10000

Translations for Norman

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

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    call in an official matter, such as to attend court
    • A. embellish
    • B. abide
    • C. denudate
    • D. summon

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