What does March mean?

Definitions for March
mɑrtʃMarch

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word March.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. March, Marnoun

    the month following February and preceding April

  2. march, marchingnoun

    the act of marching; walking with regular steps (especially in a procession of some kind)

    "it was a long march"; "we heard the sound of marching"

  3. marchnoun

    a steady advance

    "the march of science"; "the march of time"

  4. marchnoun

    a procession of people walking together

    "the march went up Fifth Avenue"

  5. borderland, border district, march, marchlandnoun

    district consisting of the area on either side of a border or boundary of a country or an area

    "the Welsh marches between England and Wales"

  6. marching music, marchnoun

    genre of music written for marching

    "Sousa wrote the best marches"

  7. Master of Architecture, MArchverb

    a degree granted for the successful completion of advanced study of architecture

  8. march, processverb

    march in a procession

    "They processed into the dining room"

  9. marchverb

    force to march

    "The Japanese marched their prisoners through Manchuria"

  10. marchverb

    walk fast, with regular or measured steps; walk with a stride

    "He marched into the classroom and announced the exam"; "The soldiers marched across the border"

  11. demonstrate, marchverb

    march in protest; take part in a demonstration

    "Thousands demonstrated against globalization during the meeting of the most powerful economic nations in Seattle"

  12. parade, exhibit, marchverb

    walk ostentatiously

    "She parades her new husband around town"

  13. marchverb

    cause to march or go at a marching pace

    "They marched the mules into the desert"

  14. border, adjoin, edge, abut, march, butt, butt against, butt onverb

    lie adjacent to another or share a boundary

    "Canada adjoins the U.S."; "England marches with Scotland"

Wiktionary

  1. Marchnoun

    The third month of the Gregorian calendar, following February and preceding April. Abbreviation: Mar or Mar.

    Etymology: March, from Marche, from marz, from martius, from earlier Mavors.

  2. Marchnoun

    for someone born in March, or for someone living near a boundary (marche).

    Etymology: March, from Marche, from marz, from martius, from earlier Mavors.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Marchnoun

    the third month of the year, containing thirty-one days

    Etymology: [OE. marche, F. marche; of German origin; cf. OHG. marcha, G. mark, akin to OS. marka, AS. mearc, Goth. marka, L. margo edge, border, margin, and possibly to E. mark a sign. 106. Cf. Margin, Margrave, Marque, Marquis.]

  2. Marchnoun

    a territorial border or frontier; a region adjacent to a boundary line; a confine; -- used chiefly in the plural, and in English history applied especially to the border land on the frontiers between England and Scotland, and England and Wales

    Etymology: [OE. marche, F. marche; of German origin; cf. OHG. marcha, G. mark, akin to OS. marka, AS. mearc, Goth. marka, L. margo edge, border, margin, and possibly to E. mark a sign. 106. Cf. Margin, Margrave, Marque, Marquis.]

  3. Marchverb

    to border; to be contiguous; to lie side by side

    Etymology: [OE. marche, F. marche; of German origin; cf. OHG. marcha, G. mark, akin to OS. marka, AS. mearc, Goth. marka, L. margo edge, border, margin, and possibly to E. mark a sign. 106. Cf. Margin, Margrave, Marque, Marquis.]

  4. Marchverb

    to move with regular steps, as a soldier; to walk in a grave, deliberate, or stately manner; to advance steadily

    Etymology: [OE. marche, F. marche; of German origin; cf. OHG. marcha, G. mark, akin to OS. marka, AS. mearc, Goth. marka, L. margo edge, border, margin, and possibly to E. mark a sign. 106. Cf. Margin, Margrave, Marque, Marquis.]

  5. Marchverb

    to proceed by walking in a body or in military order; as, the German army marched into France

    Etymology: [OE. marche, F. marche; of German origin; cf. OHG. marcha, G. mark, akin to OS. marka, AS. mearc, Goth. marka, L. margo edge, border, margin, and possibly to E. mark a sign. 106. Cf. Margin, Margrave, Marque, Marquis.]

  6. Marchverb

    tO cause to move with regular steps in the manner of a soldier; to cause to move in military array, or in a body, as troops; to cause to advance in a steady, regular, or stately manner; to cause to go by peremptory command, or by force

    Etymology: [OE. marche, F. marche; of German origin; cf. OHG. marcha, G. mark, akin to OS. marka, AS. mearc, Goth. marka, L. margo edge, border, margin, and possibly to E. mark a sign. 106. Cf. Margin, Margrave, Marque, Marquis.]

  7. Marchnoun

    the act of marching; a movement of soldiers from one stopping place to another; military progress; advance of troops

    Etymology: [OE. marche, F. marche; of German origin; cf. OHG. marcha, G. mark, akin to OS. marka, AS. mearc, Goth. marka, L. margo edge, border, margin, and possibly to E. mark a sign. 106. Cf. Margin, Margrave, Marque, Marquis.]

  8. Marchnoun

    hence: Measured and regular advance or movement, like that of soldiers moving in order; stately or deliberate walk; steady onward movement

    Etymology: [OE. marche, F. marche; of German origin; cf. OHG. marcha, G. mark, akin to OS. marka, AS. mearc, Goth. marka, L. margo edge, border, margin, and possibly to E. mark a sign. 106. Cf. Margin, Margrave, Marque, Marquis.]

  9. Marchnoun

    the distance passed over in marching; as, an hour's march; a march of twenty miles

    Etymology: [OE. marche, F. marche; of German origin; cf. OHG. marcha, G. mark, akin to OS. marka, AS. mearc, Goth. marka, L. margo edge, border, margin, and possibly to E. mark a sign. 106. Cf. Margin, Margrave, Marque, Marquis.]

  10. Marchnoun

    a piece of music designed or fitted to accompany and guide the movement of troops; a piece of music in the march form

    Etymology: [OE. marche, F. marche; of German origin; cf. OHG. marcha, G. mark, akin to OS. marka, AS. mearc, Goth. marka, L. margo edge, border, margin, and possibly to E. mark a sign. 106. Cf. Margin, Margrave, Marque, Marquis.]

Freebase

  1. March

    March is the third month of the year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. It is one of seven months that are 31 days long. In the Northern Hemisphere, the meteorological beginning of spring occurs on the first day of March. The March equinox on the 20th marks the astronomical beginning of spring in the Northern Hemisphere and the beginning of autumn in the Southern Hemisphere, where September is the seasonal equivalent of the Northern Hemisphere's March. March starts on the same day of the week as November every year, and February in common years only. March ends on the same day of the week as June every year. In leap years, March starts on the same day as September and December of the previous year. In common years, March starts on the same day as June of the previous year.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. March

    märch, n. the third month of the year, named from Mars, the god of war. [L. Martius (mensis), (the month) of Mars.]

  2. March

    märch, n. a border: boundary of a territory:—used chiefly in pl. March′es.—v.i. to border: to be adjacent.—ns. March′man, a borderer; March′-trea′son, the betrayal of a border or march to an enemy.—Riding the marches, a ceremony in which the magistrates and chief men of a city ride on horseback round the bounds of the property of the city, so as to mark plainly what are its limits. [A.S. mearc; doublet of mark.]

  3. March

    märch, v.i. to move in order, as soldiers: to walk in a grave or stately manner.—v.t. to cause to march.—n. the movement of troops: regular advance: a piece of music fitted for marching to: the distance passed over.—March past, the march of a body of soldiers in front of one remaining stationary to review them; Forced march, a march in which the men are vigorously pressed forward for combative or strategic purposes; Rogue's march, music played in derision of a person when he is expelled as a soldier, &c. [Fr. marcher. Ety. dub.; acc. to Scheler, prob. from L. marcus, a hammer (cf. 'to beat time'); others suggest root of march, a frontier.]

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. March

    the third month of our year; was before 1752 reckoned first month as in the Roman calendar, the legal year beginning on the 25th; it is proverbially dusty and stormy, and is the season of the spring equinox; it was dedicated to the Roman god Mars, whence the name.

Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

  1. march

    The movement of a body of men from one place to another. In marching it cannot be too strongly inculcated that every just movement and manœuvre depends upon the correct equality of march established and practiced by all the troops of the same army, and that when this is not attended to confusion must follow on the junction of several battalions. Also, the distance marched over; as, a march of 20 miles.

  2. march

    To cause to move in military array; to push forward, as troops; to cause to advance in a steady, regular, or stately manner.

  3. march

    The military signal for soldiers to move; a piece of music, designed or fitted to accompany and guide the movement of troops; or a piece of music composed after the measure of a march. Also, the command for soldiers to move.

  4. march

    The length of a day’s march for troops of any arm depends, to a great extent, upon the condition of the roads, the supply of water, forage, etc.; also upon the advantages to be gained over an enemy.

Editors Contribution

  1. march

    A month of a specific calendar year.

    March is a month of the gregorian calendar.

    Submitted by MaryC on March 17, 2020  

Suggested Resources

  1. march

    Song lyrics by march -- Explore a large variety of song lyrics performed by march on the Lyrics.com website.

Etymology and Origins

  1. March

    In honour of Mars, the Roman god of war.

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'March' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #650

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'March' in Written Corpus Frequency: #1541

  3. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'March' in Nouns Frequency: #2447

  4. Verbs Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'March' in Verbs Frequency: #757

How to pronounce March?

  1. Alex
    US English
    Daniel
    British
    Karen
    Australian
    Veena
    Indian

How to say March in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of March in Chaldean Numerology is: 6

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of March in Pythagorean Numerology is: 7

Examples of March in a Sentence

  1. Jenny Beth Martin:

    I think that all of those things show that what I said back in March of 2016, I wasn't right, donald Trump's proving that Donald Trump's keeping Donald Trump promises, unlike most politicians who come to Washington.

  2. Richard Benson:

    March was a period of wild deleveraging, sharp reversals, and extreme moves.

  3. Andrew Young:

    Like people said in March, it was like the' Hunger Games'( for vaccines), hospital systems were crashing, and the supply wasn't there, right now, I can tell you I'm a lot more relaxed.

  4. Ole Arve Misund:

    Normally by March, these waters would be frozen over, a layer of ice so thick that people would take their snowmobiles from town to outlying areas, but the last time they froze was a decade ago.

  5. Maria Martinez:

    Chase made the decision to exit the Canadian credit card market, as part of that exit, all credit card accounts were closed on or before March 2018. A further business decision has been made to forgive all outstanding balances in order to complete the exit.

Images & Illustrations of March

  1. MarchMarchMarchMarchMarch

Popularity rank by frequency of use

March#1#492#10000

Translations for March

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

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    identifying word or words by which someone or something is called and classified or distinguished from others
    • A. eloquent
    • B. butch
    • C. incumbent
    • D. appellative

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