What does Manchester mean?

Definitions for Manchester
ˈmænˌtʃɛs tər, -tʃə stərman·ches·ter

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word Manchester.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. Manchesternoun

    largest city in New Hampshire; located in southeastern New Hampshire on the Merrimack river

  2. Manchesternoun

    a city in northwestern England (30 miles to the east of Liverpool); heart of the most densely populated area of England

Wiktionary

  1. Manchesternoun

    Major city in the north-west of England.

  2. Manchesternoun

    Name of several towns and cities in the United States of America.

  3. manchesternoun

    Household linen.

  4. manchesternoun

    The section of a department store dealing with household linen.

  5. manchesternoun

    A type of velveteen cloth; cotton velveteen.

  6. Etymology: After the city of Manchester, England, once an important centre for the manufacture of cotton textile goods.

Wikipedia

  1. Manchester

    Manchester () is a city and metropolitan borough in Greater Manchester, England. The city has the country's fifth-largest population at 547,627 (as of 2018) and lies within the United Kingdom's second-most populous urban area, with a population of 2.7 million, third most-populous county, at around 2.8 million. It is fringed by the Cheshire Plain to the south, the Pennines to the north and east, and an arc of towns with which it forms a continuous conurbation. The local authority for the city is Manchester City Council. The recorded history of Manchester began with the civilian settlement associated with the Roman fort of Mamucium or Mancunium, which was established in about AD 79 on a sandstone bluff near the confluence of the rivers Medlock and Irwell. Although historically and traditionally a part of Lancashire, areas of Cheshire south of the River Mersey were incorporated into Manchester in the 20th century. The first to be included, Wythenshawe, was added to the city in 1931. Throughout the Middle Ages Manchester remained a manorial township, but began to expand "at an astonishing rate" around the turn of the 19th century. Manchester's unplanned urbanisation was brought on by a boom in textile manufacture during the Industrial Revolution, and resulted in it becoming the world's first industrialised city. Manchester achieved city status in 1853. The Manchester Ship Canal opened in 1894, creating the Port of Manchester and directly linking the city to the Irish Sea, 36 miles (58 km) to the west. Its fortune declined after the Second World War, owing to deindustrialisation, but the IRA bombing in 1996 led to extensive investment and regeneration. Following successful redevelopment after the IRA bombing, Manchester was the host city for the 2002 Commonwealth Games. The city is notable for its architecture, culture, musical exports, media links, scientific and engineering output, social impact, sports clubs and transport connections. Manchester Liverpool Road railway station was the world's first inter-city passenger railway station. At the University of Manchester, Ernest Rutherford first split the atom in 1917, Frederic C. Williams, Tom Kilburn and Geoff Tootill developed the world's first stored-program computer in 1948, and Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov isolated the first graphene in 2004.

ChatGPT

  1. manchester

    Manchester is a city in the northwest region of England, known for its impact on the industrial revolution in the 18th century. It is also renowned for its music scene, sports, architecture, and its association with the top football clubs, Manchester United and Manchester City. The name "Manchester" can refer to either the city itself or the wider metropolitan borough.

Wikidata

  1. Manchester

    Manchester is the largest city in the U.S. state of New Hampshire, the tenth largest city in New England, and the largest city in northern New England, an area comprising the states of Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont. It is in Hillsborough County along the banks of the Merrimack River, which divides the city into eastern and western sections. Manchester is near the northern end of the Northeast megalopolis. As of the 2010 census, the city had a population of 109,565, the most of any city in northern New England. In 2009 CNNMoney.com rated Manchester 13th in a list of the 100 best cities to live and launch a business in the United States. In addition, Kiplinger voted Manchester the second most tax friendly city in the United States, second only to Anchorage, Alaska. Also in 2009, Forbes magazine ranked the Manchester region first on its list of "America's 100 Cheapest Places to Live."

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Manchester

    on the Irwell, in the SE. of Lancashire, 30 m. E. of Liverpool, the centre of the English cotton manufacturing district, with many other textile and related industries, is an ancient, rich, and prosperous city; it has many fine buildings, including a Gothic Town Hall and Assize Court-House by Waterhouse; there is a picture-gallery, philosophic and other institutions, and technical school; Owens College is the nucleus of Victoria University; the substitution of steam for hand power began here about 1750; the industrial struggles in the beginning of the 19th century were severe, and included the famous "Peterloo massacre"; the Anti-Corn-Law League originated in Manchester, and Manchester has given its name to a school of Liberal politicians identified with the advocacy of peace abroad, free trade, no government interference with industry, and laissez-faire principles at home; the Bridgewater Canal 1762, the railway 1830, and the Ship Canal to the mouth of the Mersey 1894, mark steps in the city's progress; since 1888 Manchester with Salford (198), on the opposite bank of the Irwell, have formed a county.

Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

  1. manchester

    A city of England, in Lancashire, on the Irwell. In the time of the Druids, it was one of their principal stations. It was one of the seats of the Brigantes, who had a castle or stronghold called Mancenion; and was, about 79, selected by the Romans as a station, and called Mancunium. Called by the Saxons Manceastre. Taken from the Britons, 488; captured by Edwin of Northumbria, 620; taken by the Danes, 877; retaken, 923.

Etymology and Origins

  1. Manchester

    Expresses the Anglo-Saxon for a common on the site of a Roman camp. The Friesic man in this sense enters into many place names also on the Continent.

Surnames Frequency by Census Records

  1. MANCHESTER

    According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Manchester is ranked #6538 in terms of the most common surnames in America.

    The Manchester surname appeared 5,182 times in the 2010 census and if you were to sample 100,000 people in the United States, approximately 2 would have the surname Manchester.

    91.9% or 4,765 total occurrences were White.
    3.2% or 168 total occurrences were Black.
    2.1% or 109 total occurrences were of Hispanic origin.
    1.5% or 81 total occurrences were of two or more races.
    0.7% or 40 total occurrences were Asian.
    0.3% or 19 total occurrences were American Indian or Alaskan Native.

Matched Categories

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Manchester' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #2118

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Manchester' in Written Corpus Frequency: #2072

Anagrams for Manchester »

  1. searchment

  2. tense charm

  3. rent me cash

How to pronounce Manchester?

How to say Manchester in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of Manchester in Chaldean Numerology is: 1

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of Manchester in Pythagorean Numerology is: 7

Examples of Manchester in a Sentence

  1. The FA:

    A comment posted on the Manchester United striker’s Instagram page was insulting, abusive, improper and brought the game into disrepute contrary to FA Rule E3.1, the post also constitutes an ‘aggravated breach’, which is defined in FA Rule E3.2, as it included reference, whether express or implied, to colour and/or race and/or ethnic origin.

  2. Paul Pogba:

    First of all( we must) win the league for the first time with Manchester United because I hadn't won the league when I left, the Champions League of course, and personally, one of my dreams is to win the Ballon d'Or.

  3. Christian Eriksen:

    Manchester United is Manchester United, and I can not wait to get started, i have had the privilege of playing at Old Trafford many times but to do it in the red shirt of Manchester United will be an amazing feeling.

  4. Isaac Asimov:

    Dalton's records, carefully preserved for a century, were destroyed during the World War II bombing of Manchester. It is not only the living who are killed in war.

  5. The AFA:

    The Manchester United player today suffered a joint (injury) in his right knee that requires surgery.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

Manchester#1#3443#10000

Translations for Manchester

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"Manchester." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 13 Apr. 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/Manchester>.

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