What does Knock mean?

Definitions for Knock
nɒkKnock

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word Knock.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. knock, knockingnoun

    the sound of knocking (as on a door or in an engine or bearing)

    "the knocking grew louder"

  2. knock, roastnoun

    negative criticism

  3. knock, bash, bang, smash, beltnoun

    a vigorous blow

    "the sudden knock floored him"; "he took a bash right in his face"; "he got a bang on the head"

  4. knocknoun

    a bad experience

    "the school of hard knocks"

  5. knock, belt, rap, whack, whangverb

    the act of hitting vigorously

    "he gave the table a whack"

  6. knock, strike hardverb

    deliver a sharp blow or push :"He knocked the glass clear across the room"

  7. knockverb

    rap with the knuckles

    "knock on the door"

  8. bump, knockverb

    knock against with force or violence

    "My car bumped into the tree"

  9. tap, rap, knock, pinkverb

    make light, repeated taps on a surface

    "he was tapping his fingers on the table impatiently"

  10. pink, ping, knockverb

    sound like a car engine that is firing too early

    "the car pinged when I put in low-octane gasoline"; "The car pinked when the ignition was too far retarded"

  11. knock, criticize, criticise, pick apartverb

    find fault with; express criticism of; point out real or perceived flaws

    "The paper criticized the new movie"; "Don't knock the food--it's free"

GCIDE

  1. Knockverb

    To criticise; to find fault with; to disparage.

Wiktionary

  1. knocknoun

    An abrupt rapping sound, as from an impact of a hard object against wood

    I heard a knock on my door.

    Etymology: Akin to Old Norse knoka (compare Swedish knocka, Danish knuge, to hug) and Middle High German knochen, to hit.

  2. knocknoun

    An impact.

    He took a knock on the head.

    Etymology: Akin to Old Norse knoka (compare Swedish knocka, Danish knuge, to hug) and Middle High German knochen, to hit.

  3. knocknoun

    a batsman's innings.

    He played a slow but sure knock of 35.

    Etymology: Akin to Old Norse knoka (compare Swedish knocka, Danish knuge, to hug) and Middle High German knochen, to hit.

  4. knocknoun

    A type of abnormal combustion occurring in spark ignition engines caused by self-ignition or the characteristic knocking sound associated with it.

    Etymology: Akin to Old Norse knoka (compare Swedish knocka, Danish knuge, to hug) and Middle High German knochen, to hit.

  5. knockverb

    To rap one's knuckles against something, especially wood.

    Knock on the door and find out if they're home.

    Etymology: Akin to Old Norse knoka (compare Swedish knocka, Danish knuge, to hug) and Middle High German knochen, to hit.

  6. knockverb

    To bump or impact.

    I knocked against the table and bruised my leg.

    Etymology: Akin to Old Norse knoka (compare Swedish knocka, Danish knuge, to hug) and Middle High German knochen, to hit.

  7. knockverb

    To denigrate, undervalue.

    Don't knock it until you've tried it.

    Etymology: Akin to Old Norse knoka (compare Swedish knocka, Danish knuge, to hug) and Middle High German knochen, to hit.

  8. knockverb

    To pass, kick a ball towards another player.

    Etymology: Akin to Old Norse knoka (compare Swedish knocka, Danish knuge, to hug) and Middle High German knochen, to hit.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Knockverb

    to drive or be driven against something; to strike against something; to clash; as, one heavy body knocks against another

    Etymology: [OE. knoken, AS. cnocian, cnucian; prob. of imitative origin; cf. Sw. knacka. Cf. Knack.]

  2. Knockverb

    to strike or beat with something hard or heavy; to rap; as, to knock with a club; to knock on the door

    Etymology: [OE. knoken, AS. cnocian, cnucian; prob. of imitative origin; cf. Sw. knacka. Cf. Knack.]

  3. Knockverb

    to strike with something hard or heavy; to move by striking; to drive (a thing) against something; as, to knock a ball with a bat; to knock the head against a post; to knock a lamp off the table

    Etymology: [OE. knoken, AS. cnocian, cnucian; prob. of imitative origin; cf. Sw. knacka. Cf. Knack.]

  4. Knockverb

    to strike for admittance; to rap upon, as a door

    Etymology: [OE. knoken, AS. cnocian, cnucian; prob. of imitative origin; cf. Sw. knacka. Cf. Knack.]

  5. Knocknoun

    a blow; a stroke with something hard or heavy; a jar

    Etymology: [OE. knoken, AS. cnocian, cnucian; prob. of imitative origin; cf. Sw. knacka. Cf. Knack.]

  6. Knocknoun

    a stroke, as on a door for admittance; a rap

    Etymology: [OE. knoken, AS. cnocian, cnucian; prob. of imitative origin; cf. Sw. knacka. Cf. Knack.]

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Knock

    nok, v.i. to strike with something hard or heavy: to drive or be driven against: to strike for admittance: to rap.—v.t. to strike: to drive against.—n. a sudden stroke: a rap.—adj. Knock′-down, such as to overthrow.—ns. Knock′er, the hammer suspended to a door for making a knock: a goblin inhabiting a mine who points out the presence of ore by knocks; Knock′ing, a beating on a door: a rap.—adj. Knock′-kneed, having knees that knock or touch in walking.—Knock about (slang), to saunter, loaf about; Knock down, to fell with a blow: assign to a bidder with a tap of the auctioneer's hammer; Knock into a cocked hat (see Cock); Knock off, to desist, cease: to accomplish hastily; Knock on the head, to bring to a sudden stop; Knock out, to beat in a boxing match, to overcome generally: to lose the scent—of hounds in fox-hunting; Knock-out auction, an auction where the bidders are largely swindling confederates; Knock together, to get together or construct hastily; Knock under, to give in, yield; Knock up, to rouse by knocking: weary out, or be worn out: to construct hastily: (U.S.) to get with child. [A.S. cnucian, cnocian; imit. like knack; cf. Gael. cnac, cnag, &c.]

British National Corpus

  1. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Knock' in Written Corpus Frequency: #1853

  2. Verbs Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Knock' in Verbs Frequency: #430

How to pronounce Knock?

How to say Knock in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of Knock in Chaldean Numerology is: 1

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of Knock in Pythagorean Numerology is: 9

Examples of Knock in a Sentence

  1. Joe Conlon:

    Down in Central and South America, they’re using these thermal foggers— that can work and knock down the mosquito, but in the U.S, they’re not going to allow federal and state folks to allow them into their homes to do that, it’s not something that mosquito abatement will do, but public pressure may make them do that. People might demand something like that of their own volition.

  2. Edward Blackwell:

    Hark, a knock at the door!

  3. Ted Cruz:

    No, I don't intend to send jackboots to knock on your door and every door in America, that's not how we enforce the law for any crime.

  4. Latino President Darryl Morin:

    Never once did he knock on the door or ring, press the ring doorbell to get ahold of the person inside to try to deliver the package, the only information this driver had that could serve as a trigger for this deep-seated hate was the name on the package. The addressee, the person [to] whom the package was addressed, had never met this individual in their life.

  5. President Mahamadou Issoufou:

    We will beat them, our adversaries, and with a knock-out blow that will be a historical milestone, since it will be the first time that a candidate will win in the first round.

Images & Illustrations of Knock

  1. KnockKnockKnockKnockKnock

Popularity rank by frequency of use

Knock#1#9810#10000

Translations for Knock

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    separate or cut with a tool, such as a sharp instrument
    • A. summon
    • B. loom
    • C. efface
    • D. cleave

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