What does Italy mean?

Definitions for Italy
ˈɪt l iita·ly

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word Italy.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. Italy, Italian Republic, Italianoun

    a republic in southern Europe on the Italian Peninsula; was the core of the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire between the 4th century BC and the 5th century AD

Wiktionary

  1. Italynoun

    A country in southern Europe, one of the states of the European Union. Official name: The Italian Republic (in Italian, la Repubblica Italiana).

  2. Etymology: From Italy, Italie, from Italia, from Italia, via Ἰταλία, from (a name for the southwestern tip of the boot of Italy), meaning "land of bulls" in Oscan; usually assumed to be a cognate of vitulus, despite the different length of the i.

Wikipedia

  1. Italy

    Italy (Italian: Italia [iˈtaːlja] (listen)), officially the Italian Republic, or the Republic of Italy, is a country in Southern and Western Europe. Located in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea, it consists of a peninsula delimited by the Alps and surrounded by several islands; its territory largely coincides with the homonymous geographical region. Italy shares land borders with France, Switzerland, Austria, Slovenia and the enclaved microstates of Vatican City and San Marino. It has a territorial exclave in Switzerland, Campione. Italy covers an area of 301,230 km2 (116,310 sq mi), with a population of about 60 million. It is the third-most populous member state of the European Union, the sixth-most populous country in Europe, and the tenth-largest country in the continent by land area. Italy's capital and largest city is Rome. Italy was the native place of many civilizations such as the Italic peoples and the Etruscans, while due to its central geographic location in Southern Europe and the Mediterranean, the country has also historically been home to myriad peoples and cultures, who immigrated to the peninsula throughout history. The Latins, native of central Italy, formed the Roman Kingdom in the 8th century BC, which eventually became a republic with a government of the Senate and the People. The Roman Republic initially conquered and assimilated its neighbours on the Italian peninsula, eventually expanding and conquering a large part of Europe, North Africa and Western Asia. By the first century BC, the Roman Empire emerged as the dominant power in the Mediterranean Basin and became a leading cultural, political and religious centre, inaugurating the Pax Romana, a period of more than 200 years during which Italy's law, technology, economy, art, and literature developed.During the Early Middle Ages, Italy endured the fall of the Western Roman Empire and the Barbarian Invasions, but by the 11th century, numerous city-states and maritime republics, mostly in the North, became prosperous through trade, commerce, and banking, laying the groundwork for modern capitalism. The Renaissance began in Italy and spread to the rest of Europe, bringing a renewed interest in humanism, science, exploration, and art. During the Middle Ages, Italian explorers discovered new routes to the Far East and the New World, helping to usher in the European Age of Discovery. However, centuries of rivalry and infighting between the Italian city-states, and the invasions of other European powers during the Italian Wars of the 15th and 16th centuries, left Italy politically fragmented. Italy's commercial and political power significantly waned during the 17th and 18th centuries with the decline of the Catholic Church and the increasing importance of trade routes that bypassed the Mediterranean.By the mid-19th century, rising Italian nationalism, along with other social, economic, and military events, led to a period of revolutionary political upheaval. After centuries of political and territorial divisions, Italy was almost entirely unified in 1861 following a war of independence, establishing the Kingdom of Italy. From the late 19th century to the early 20th century, Italy rapidly industrialised, mainly in the north, and acquired a colonial empire, while the south remained largely impoverished and excluded from industrialisation, fuelling a large and influential diaspora. Despite being one of the victorious allied powers in World War I, Italy entered a period of economic crisis and social turmoil, leading to the rise of the Italian fascist dictatorship in 1922. The participation of Italy in World War II on the Axis led to the Italian surrender to Allied powers and its occupation by Nazi Germany helped by Fascists, followed by the rise of the Italian Resistance and the subsequent Italian Civil War and liberation of Italy. After the war, the country abolished its monarchy, established a democratic unitary parliamentary republic, and enjoyed a prolonged economic boom, getting a major advanced economy.Italy is a highly developed country, ranking 30th in the Human Development index. Having the tenth-largest nominal GDP (third in the European Union) in the world, the ninth-largest national wealth and the third-largest central bank gold reserve. It ranks highly in life expectancy, quality of life, healthcare,and education. The country is a great power, and it has a significant role in regional and global economic, military, cultural, and diplomatic affairs. Italy is a founding and leading member of the European Union and a member of numerous international institutions, including the United Nations, NATO, the OECD, the G7, the Latin Union, the Schengen Area, and many more. The source of many inventions and discoveries, the country is considered a cultural superpower and has long been a global centre of art, music, literature, philosophy, science and technology, tourism and fashion, as well as having greatly influenced and contributed to

ChatGPT

  1. italy

    Italy is a country located in Southern Europe on the Italian Peninsula. It is a democratic republic and its capital is Rome. Italy is known for its rich history, diverse cultural heritage, contributions to arts, sciences, and renowned cuisine. It is famous for iconic landmarks including the Colosseum, Leaning Tower of Pisa, and the Vatican City, which hosts St. Peter's Basilica and the Sistine Chapel. Italy is also noted for its major role in world events, such as being the birthplace of the Renaissance and the heart of the Roman Empire.

Wikidata

  1. Italy

    Italy, officially the Italian Republic, is a unitary parliamentary republic in Southern Europe. To the north, it borders France, Switzerland, Austria, and Slovenia along the Alps. To the south, it consists of the entirety of the Italian Peninsula, Sicily, Sardinia–the two largest islands in the Mediterranean Sea–and many other smaller islands. The independent states of San Marino and the Vatican City are enclaves within Italy, while Campione d'Italia is an Italian exclave in Switzerland. The territory of Italy covers some 301,338 km² and is influenced by a temperate seasonal climate. With 60.8 million inhabitants, it is the fifth most populous country in Europe, and the 23rd most populous in the world. Rome, the capital of Italy, has for centuries been a political and religious centre of Western civilisation as the capital of the Roman Empire and site of the Holy See. After the decline of the Roman Empire, Italy endured numerous invasions by foreign peoples, from Germanic tribes such as the Lombards and Ostrogoths, to the Byzantines and later, the Normans, among others. Centuries later, Italy became the birthplace of Maritime republics and the Renaissance. Through much of its post-Roman history, Italy was fragmented into numerous city and regional states, but was unified in 1861. In the late 19th century, through World War I, and to World War II, Italy possessed a colonial empire.

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Italy

    the central one of three peninsulas stretching into the Mediterranean Sea, in the S. of Europe, has the Adriatic and Tyrrhenian Seas respectively on the E. and W., and is separated from France, Switzerland, and Austria in the N. by the various ranges of the Alps. Between the Alps and the Apennines lies the extensive, fertile plain of Lombardy, watered by the river Po, and containing several large lakes, such as Garda, Como, and Maggiore. The Apennines form a very picturesque chain of mountains 5000 ft. high down the centre of the country. The climate varies in different districts, but is mostly warm. Malaria curses many parts in autumn. Agriculture is extensive, but primitive in manner, and the peasantry are very poor. The most important crops are cereals, including rice and maize, grapes, olives, and chestnuts, and in the S. oranges and lemons. Italian wines are of indifferent quality. Coal and iron are scarce; sulphur is produced in large quantities in Sicily. There are large quarries of marble and alabaster. The most important industries are silk, glass, and porcelain. There is an extensive foreign trade, chiefly with France and Great Britain; the exports consist of silk, sulphur, marble, fruit, and wine; the imports of coal, iron, and textile goods. The religion is Roman Catholic; education is now compulsory. The Gothic kingdom of Italy was founded on the ruins of the Roman Empire, A.D. 489. In succession the country was conquered by the forces of the Byzantine Empire, by the Lombards, and by the Franks. From the 11th century onwards its history has been one of constant internal strife and confusion. The presence of the papal power in Rome, the rise of such rich trading republics as the cities of Milan, Florence, Naples, Genoa, and Venice, the pretensions of French kings and German emperors, and factions like those of the Guelphs and Ghibellines, produced endless complications and ruinous wars. In the 16th century the influence of the Austro-Spanish house of Charles V. became dominant; his son, Philip II., was king of Milan and Naples. In more recent times the small states of Italy were continually involved in the wars which devastated Europe, and passed in alliance or in subordination into the hands of Austria, France, and Spain alternately. The last 50 years have seen the unification of the kingdom. After the abortive movement of Mazzini came Cavour and Garibaldi, who, after severe struggles against the Austrians in the North and the despots of Southern Italy, proclaimed Victor Emmanuel king of Italy in 1861. By various steps the whole of the peninsula, with the islands of Sardinia and Sicily, have been brought into the kingdom. The temporal power of the Pope ceased in 1870. The Government is a constitutional monarchy. Franchise is exercised by every citizen who can read and write. Conscription is in force for army and navy. These are both strong, the navy one of the best in Europe. Finances are bad; the debt amounts to £520,000,000, and taxation is ruinous.

Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

  1. italy

    A peninsula in the south of Europe. The invading Pelasgians from Greece, and the aborigines (Umbrians, Oscans, and Etruscans), combined, formed the renowned Latin race still possessing the southern part of Europe. The history of Italy is soon absorbed into that of Rome, founded 753 B.C. Previous to the 15th century it was desolated by intestine wars and the interference of the German emperors; since then, Spain, France, and Germany have struggled for the possession of the country, which has been divided among them several times. Spain predominated in Italy during the 16th and 17th centuries; but was compelled to yield to the house of Austria at the beginning of the 18th century. The victories of Bonaparte in 1797-98 changed the government of Italy; but the Austrian rule was re-established at the peace of 1814. In 1848 the Milanese and Venetians revolted and joined Piedmont, but were subdued by Radetzky. The hostile feeling between Austria and Piedmont gradually increased till war broke out in April, 1859, in which the Austrians were defeated, and the kingdom of Italy was re-established in 1861. Another war with Austria was declared in June, 1866, but peace was signed in October, same year, and Venetia was ceded to Italy. For other details, see Rome and the various Italian cities throughout this volume.

Etymology and Origins

  1. Italy

    The modern form of the Roman description of the country, Latium, or “broad plain.” This resulted in the designation of all the tribes of the conquered districts as Latini, or the Latins.

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Italy' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #2024

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Italy' in Written Corpus Frequency: #3452

How to pronounce Italy?

How to say Italy in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of Italy in Chaldean Numerology is: 1

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of Italy in Pythagorean Numerology is: 4

Examples of Italy in a Sentence

  1. Paolo Baretta:

    I have met many in the industry who are aware of the fact that in Italy there are too many opportunities to gamble and so there is a widespread need to rein it in order to safeguard public health.

  2. Jamie Dimon:

    If we could pull something like that off, that would be great for Italy.

  3. Richard Gilmore:

    I was sort of delegated from time to time to look after Lorelai Gilmore, and I was very, very fond of Lorelai Gilmore, one summer, I thought,' Lorelai Gilmore's not going to make it. Lorelai Gilmore's going to burn out.' But then Lorelai Gilmore went to Italy with a friend to learn cooking, and I thought.

  4. Ignazio Visco:

    Italy must now find the cohesion it needs to return to the path of development.

  5. Scott Cooper:

    Whether it's Naples, Italy or it's Detroit or it's Los Angeles or it's New York or it's Boston, crime and politics tend to interweave and lead to disastrous consequences.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

Italy#1#1355#10000

Translations for Italy

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

Get even more translations for Italy »

Translation

Find a translation for the Italy definition in other languages:

Select another language:

  • - Select -
  • 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified)
  • 繁體中文 (Chinese - Traditional)
  • Español (Spanish)
  • Esperanto (Esperanto)
  • 日本語 (Japanese)
  • Português (Portuguese)
  • Deutsch (German)
  • العربية (Arabic)
  • Français (French)
  • Русский (Russian)
  • ಕನ್ನಡ (Kannada)
  • 한국어 (Korean)
  • עברית (Hebrew)
  • Gaeilge (Irish)
  • Українська (Ukrainian)
  • اردو (Urdu)
  • Magyar (Hungarian)
  • मानक हिन्दी (Hindi)
  • Indonesia (Indonesian)
  • Italiano (Italian)
  • தமிழ் (Tamil)
  • Türkçe (Turkish)
  • తెలుగు (Telugu)
  • ภาษาไทย (Thai)
  • Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese)
  • Čeština (Czech)
  • Polski (Polish)
  • Bahasa Indonesia (Indonesian)
  • Românește (Romanian)
  • Nederlands (Dutch)
  • Ελληνικά (Greek)
  • Latinum (Latin)
  • Svenska (Swedish)
  • Dansk (Danish)
  • Suomi (Finnish)
  • فارسی (Persian)
  • ייִדיש (Yiddish)
  • հայերեն (Armenian)
  • Norsk (Norwegian)
  • English (English)

Word of the Day

Would you like us to send you a FREE new word definition delivered to your inbox daily?

Please enter your email address:


Citation

Use the citation below to add this definition to your bibliography:

Style:MLAChicagoAPA

"Italy." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 21 May 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/Italy>.

Discuss these Italy definitions with the community:

0 Comments

    Are we missing a good definition for Italy? Don't keep it to yourself...

    Image or illustration of

    Italy

    Credit »

    Free, no signup required:

    Add to Chrome

    Get instant definitions for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

    Free, no signup required:

    Add to Firefox

    Get instant definitions for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

    Browse Definitions.net

    Quiz

    Are you a words master?

    »
    the act of carrying something
    A carry
    B attend
    C observe
    D jeopardize

    Nearby & related entries:

    Alternative searches for Italy: