What does Iceland mean?

Definitions for Iceland
ˈaɪs ləndIce·land

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word Iceland.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. Iceland, Republic of Icelandnoun

    an island republic on the island of Iceland; became independent of Denmark in 1944

  2. Icelandnoun

    a volcanic island in the North Atlantic near the Arctic Circle

Wiktionary

  1. Icelandnoun

    A country in Europe. Official name: Republic of Iceland.

  2. Icelandnoun

    An island in the North Atlantic Ocean.

Freebase

  1. Iceland

    Iceland is a Nordic island country situated at the confluence of the North Atlantic and Arctic Oceans, on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The country has a population of about 320,000 and a total area of 103,000 km², which makes it the most sparsely populated country in Europe. The capital and largest city is Reykjavík, with the surrounding areas in the southwestern region of the country being home to two-thirds of the country's population. The nation's capital is the most northern capital in the world. Iceland is volcanically and geologically active. The interior consists mainly of a plateau characterised by sand and lava fields, mountains and glaciers, while many glacial rivers flow to the sea through the lowlands. Iceland is warmed by the Gulf Stream and has a temperate climate despite a high latitude just outside the Arctic Circle. According to Landnámabók, the settlement of Iceland began in AD 874 when the chieftain Ingólfr Arnarson became the first permanent Norse settler on the island. Others had visited the island earlier and stayed over winter. Over the following centuries, Norsemen settled Iceland, bringing with them thralls of Gaelic origin. From 1262 to 1918, Iceland was part of the Norwegian and later the Danish monarchies. The country became independent in 1918 and a republic was declared in 1944. Until the 20th century, the Icelandic population relied largely on fishing and agriculture, and the country was one of the poorest and least developed in the world. Industrialisation of the fisheries and aid from the Marshall Plan brought prosperity in the years after World War II, and by the 1990s, Iceland became one of the wealthiest and most developed nations in the world. In 1994, Iceland became party to the European Economic Area, which made it possible for the economy to diversify into economic and financial services.

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Iceland

    a volcanic island larger by a third than Scotland, lying just S. of the polar circle, between Greenland and Norway, distant 250 m. from the former and 500 from the latter; consists of a plateau 2000 ft. high, sometimes sloping to the sea, sometimes ending in sheer precipices, from which rise numerous snow-clad volcanoes, some, like Hecla, still active. "A wild land of barrenness and lava," Carlyle characterises it, "swallowed up many months of the year in black tempests, yet with a wild gleaming beauty in summer time, towering up there stern and grim, with its snow jokuls and roaring geysers, and horrid volcanic chasms, like the waste chaotic battlefield of frost and fire." The interior comprises lava and sand tracts, and ice-fields, but outside these are river valleys and lake districts affording pasturage, and arable land capable of producing root crops. The climate is changeable, mild for the latitude, but somewhat colder than Scotland. There are few trees, and these small; cranberries grow among the heather, and Iceland moss is a plentiful article of food. The island exports sheep and ponies; the fisheries are important, including cod, seals, and whales; sulphur and coal are found; the hot springs are famous, especially the Great Geyser, near Hecla. Discovered by Irishmen and colonised by Norwegians in the 9th century, Iceland passed over to the Danes in 1388, who granted it home rule in 1893. The religion has been Protestant since 1550; its elementary education is excellent. Reykjavik (3) is the capital; two towns have 500 inhabitants each; the rest of the population is scattered in isolated farms; stock-raising and fishing are the principal industries, and the manufacture of homespun for their own use.

Etymology and Origins

  1. Iceland

    So called because its north and west coasts are generally blocked with ice that has drifted down from Greenland.

Matched Categories

How to pronounce Iceland?

How to say Iceland in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of Iceland in Chaldean Numerology is: 4

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of Iceland in Pythagorean Numerology is: 3

Examples of Iceland in a Sentence

  1. Olafur Eliasson:

    One of the main sources of inspiration was for me my childhood in Iceland where the harbour,... where I spent a lot of time as my father was a sailor, sometimes filled up with boats so you could cross the harbour by going from one deck to the next.

  2. Matthias Kjartansson:

    It is a tourism tsunami, all over Iceland, there are no hotel rooms. It is crazy.

  3. Kolbrn Reykfjr Gylfadttir:

    TEXAS GRANDMOTHER RESCUED AFTER POSING ON ICEBERG THRONE THAT DRIFTED OUT TO SEA DURING ICELAND VACATION In Iceland, the iconic Reynisfjara Beach has been the site where several tourists have died over the past decade due to the waves, with many close calls also being reported. Around the same time of the incident caught on video, another tourist was injured when he was also knocked over by a wave and nearly dragged out to sea, Icelandic news site Visir reported. A warning sign at Reynisfjara Beach in Iceland as seen in October 2018. ( Travis Fedschun/Fox News) The entrance to the beach area does feature warning signs that highlight the risk, but officials said the two incidents have prompted a safety review of the tourist site. CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP At a meeting on Friday, government officials introduced measures to improve safety at the beach that could allow police to close the site for five to seven days from November till March every year due to weather conditions, Icelandic news outlet Morgunblai reported. A group of tourists in Iceland were left scampering to safety when a large chunk of a nearby glacier suddenly collapsed into the sea, producing a gigantic wave that caught the adventurers by surprise. Another project in the works is a wave forecast system for the beach with a connected warning system to inform tourists who plan on traveling to the site. The project would also include a mast on the beach with a light that would flash a warning at times of danger, according to the Iceland Review. Icelandic Minister of Tourism, Industry and Innovation rds Kolbrn Reykfjr Gylfadttir has said the recent incidents prove why a risk evaluation of the area is necessary. Its unacceptable that theres a risk of a massive accident in one of the most popular tourist locations in the country, without the necessary arrangements in place, certain improvements have been made, but the responsibility for the case is complicated as well as the fact that travelers often ignore warnings, putting themselves at great risk.

  4. Paul Whelan:

    He liked to travel wherever he could. He has been to India and Iceland, all over the place. He has friends in Russia, so that would be an extra draw, people he's met on social media, but I don't know that Russia was a particular place of return for him.

  5. International Data Corporation Nebuloni:

    I think there is certainly an opportunity (for Iceland) - especially for workloads such as technical computing, high performance computing and lightweight consumer Web applications.

Images & Illustrations of Iceland

  1. IcelandIcelandIcelandIcelandIceland

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Translations for Iceland

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    showing intellectual penetration or emotional depth
    • A. dependable
    • B. profound
    • C. reassuring
    • D. sought

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