What does Hamburg mean?

Definitions for Hamburg
ˈhæm bɜrg, ˈhɑm bʊərgHam·burg

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word Hamburg.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. Hamburgnoun

    a port city in northern Germany on the Elbe River that was founded by Charlemagne in the 9th century and is today the largest port in Germany; in 1241 it formed an alliance with Lubeck that became the basis for the Hanseatic League

Wiktionary

  1. Hamburgnoun

    One of the component states of Germany according to the current administrative division of the nation.

    Etymology: From the name of a fortress in the area, Hammaburg.

  2. Hamburgnoun

    A city in Germany.

    Etymology: From the name of a fortress in the area, Hammaburg.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Hamburgnoun

    a commercial city of Germany, near the mouth of the Elbe

Freebase

  1. Hamburg

    Hamburg, officially Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg, is the second largest city in Germany and the sixth largest city in the European Union. It is also the thirteenth largest German state. The city is home to over 1.8 million people, while the Hamburg Metropolitan Region has more than 5 million inhabitants. Situated on the river Elbe, the port of Hamburg is the second largest port in Europe and tenth largest worldwide. Hamburg's official name, Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg, reflects Hamburg's history as a member of the medieval Hanseatic League, as a free imperial city of the Holy Roman Empire, and that Hamburg is a city-state and one of the sixteen States of Germany. Before the 1871 Unification of Germany, Hamburg was a fully sovereign state of its own. Prior to the constitutional changes in 1919, the stringent civic republic was ruled by a class of hereditary grand burghers or Hanseaten. Hamburg is a major transport hub in Northern Germany and is one of the most affluent cities in Europe. It has become a media and industrial centre, with plants and facilities belonging to Airbus, Blohm + Voss and Aurubis. The radio and television broadcaster Norddeutscher Rundfunk and publishers such as Gruner + Jahr and Spiegel-Verlag are pillars of the important media industry in Hamburg. Hamburg has been an important financial centre for centuries, and is the seat of the world's second oldest bank, Berenberg Bank. In total, there are more than 120,000 enterprises.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Hamburg

    ham′burg, n. a black variety of grape—often Black Hamburg: a small-sized variety of the domestic fowl, with blue legs, including the Black, Gold- and Silver-pencilled, and Gold- and Silver-spangled Hamburgs.

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Hamburg

    a small German State (623) which includes the free city of Hamburg (323; suburbs, 245), Bergedorf, and Cuxhaven; the city, the chief emporium of German commerce, is situated on the Elbe, 75 m. E. of the North Sea and 177 NW. of Berlin; was founded by Charlemagne in 808, and is to-day the fifth commercial city of the world; the old town is intersected by canals, while the new portion, built since 1842, is spaciously laid out; the town library, a fine building, contains 400,000 volumes; its principal manufactures embrace cigar-making, distilling, brewing, sugar-refining, &c.

Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

  1. hamburg

    A famous free city of Germany, and one of the most important commercial ports in Europe, is situated on the right bank of the Elbe, about 70 miles from its mouth. It is said to have been founded in the 8th century by Charlemagne. In the 13th century it joined Lubeck in the formation of the Hanseatic League. It was occupied by the French from 1806 to 1809, and was annexed to France in 1810. The Russians became masters of it in 1813, but the French regained possession of it in the same year, and Marshal Davoust sustained a memorable siege here in 1813-14. In 1871 Hamburg became a member of the German empire.

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of Hamburg in Chaldean Numerology is: 5

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of Hamburg in Pythagorean Numerology is: 7

Examples of Hamburg in a Sentence

  1. Erie County:

    All evidence related to this case that was given to Erie County Central Police Services by the Town of Hamburg Police Department is accounted for and remains in its original packaging in the possession of Erie County Central Police Services.

  2. Uwe Becker:

    Richard Grenell has a strong and convincing background in foreign policy with Richard Grenell long term experience at the United Nations and in other positions, not having a serving American ambassador under the American flag besides the Brandenburg Gate is not a good symbol for the deep friendship that we have with the United States. Carsten Ovens, a Christian Democratic Union politician in the German city-state of Hamburg, told Fox News it is regrettable the appointed U.S. Ambassador Richard Grenell can not start Carsten Ovens service.

  3. Anders Levermann:

    The sea level rise from Western Antarctica will eventually submerge Hamburg, Shanghai, New York and Hong Kong, you can't negotiate with physics: that's the dilemma here.

  4. Colin Farrell:

    I dedicate this award to Joko and Klass, thank you very much. There is a saying in Hamburg, which is, ‘bye bye!’.

  5. Howard Zinn:

    Was all this bloodshed and deceit - from Columbus to Cortes, Pizarro the Puritans - a necessity for the human race to progress from savagery to civilization? Was Morison right in burying the story of genocide inside a more important story of human progress? Perhaps a persuasive argument can be made - as it was made by Stalin when he killed pesants for industrial progress in the Soviet Union, as it was made by Churchill explaining the bombings of Dresden and Hamburg, and Truman explaining Hiroshima. But how can the judgement be made if the benefits and losses cannot be balanced because the losses are either unmentioned or mentioned quickly?

Images & Illustrations of Hamburg

  1. HamburgHamburgHamburgHamburgHamburg

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Translations for Hamburg

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    having a build with little fat or muscle but with long limbs
    • A. ectomorphic
    • B. indiscernible
    • C. elusive
    • D. epidemic

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