What does Glasgow mean?

Definitions for Glasgow
ˈglæs goʊ, -koʊ; for 2 also ˈglæz goʊGlas·gow

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word Glasgow.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. Glasgownoun

    largest city in Scotland; a port on the Clyde in west central Scotland; one of the great shipbuilding centers of the world

Wiktionary

  1. Glasgownoun

    A city in Lanarkshire and the largest in Scotland.

    Etymology: From glas cu; usually romantically translated as "the dear green place." Compare modern Gaelic Glaschu

Wikipedia

  1. Glasgow

    Glasgow (, also UK: , US: ; Scots: Glesca or Glesga [ˈɡlezɡə]; Scottish Gaelic: Glaschu [ˈkl̪ˠas̪əxu]) is the most populous city in Scotland. It is the third most populous city in the United Kingdom, as of the 2019 estimated city population of 611,748. Historically part of Lanarkshire, the city now forms the Glasgow City council area, one of the 32 council areas of Scotland; the local authority is Glasgow City Council. Glasgow is situated on the River Clyde in the country's West Central Lowlands. It is the fifth most visited city in the UK.Inhabitants of the city are referred to as "Glaswegians" or, in the pejorative, as "Weegies". Glasgow is also known for the Glasgow patter, a distinct dialect of the Scots language that is noted for being difficult to understand by those from outside the city. Glasgow grew from a small rural settlement on the River Clyde to become the largest seaport in Scotland, and tenth largest by tonnage in Britain. Expanding from the medieval bishopric and royal burgh, and the later establishment of the University of Glasgow in the fifteenth century, it became a major centre of the Scottish Enlightenment in the eighteenth century. From the eighteenth century onwards, the city also grew as one of Great Britain's main hubs of transatlantic trade with North America and the West Indies. With the onset of the Industrial Revolution, the population and economy of Glasgow and the surrounding region expanded rapidly to become one of the world's pre-eminent centres of chemicals, textiles and engineering; most notably in the shipbuilding and marine engineering industry, which produced many innovative and famous vessels. Glasgow was the "Second City of the British Empire" for much of the Victorian era and Edwardian period, having taken the mantle from pre-independence Dublin, which was largely recognised the second city during the Georgian era. Although many other cities argue the title was theirs, not Glasgow's.In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, Glasgow's population grew rapidly, reaching a peak of 1,127,825 people in 1938. Comprehensive urban renewal projects in the 1960s resulted in large-scale relocation of people to designated new towns, such as Cumbernauld, Livingston, East Kilbride and peripheral suburbs, followed by successive boundary changes. This process reduced the population of the City of Glasgow council area to an estimated 633,120, with 985,290 people living in the defined Greater Glasgow contiguous urban area as of 2016. The wider metropolitan area is home to over 1,800,000 people, equating to around 33% of Scotland's population. The city has one of the highest densities of any locality in Scotland at 4,023/km2. Glasgow hosted the 2014 Commonwealth Games and the first European Championships in 2018; and is also well known in the sporting world for football (particularly the Old Firm rivalry between Celtic and Rangers), rugby, athletics, tennis, golf and swimming. Today, Glasgow has a diverse architectural scene, one of the key factors leading visitors to the city. From the city centre sprawling with grand Victorian buildings, to the many glass and metal edifices in the International Financial Services District to the serpentine terraces of blonde and red sandstone in the fashionable west end and the imposing mansions which make up Pollokshields, on the south side. The banks of the River Clyde are also dotted with a plethora of futuristic-looking buildings which include Riverside Museum, Glasgow Science Centre, the SSE Hydro and the SEC Armadillo.

Freebase

  1. Glasgow

    Glasgow is the largest city in Scotland and the third largest in the United Kingdom. It is situated on the River Clyde in the country's West Central Lowlands. Inhabitants of the city are referred to as Glaswegians. Glasgow grew from a small rural settlement on the River Clyde to become one of the largest seaports in the world. Expanding from the medieval bishopric and royal burgh, and the later establishment of the University of Glasgow in the 15th century, it became a major centre of the Scottish Enlightenment in the 18th century. From the 18th century the city also grew as one of Great Britain's main hubs of transatlantic trade with North America and the West Indies. With the onset of the Industrial Revolution, the population and economy of Glasgow and the surrounding region expanded rapidly to become one of the world's pre-eminent centres of chemicals, textiles and engineering; most notably in the shipbuilding and marine engineering industry, which produced many innovative and famous vessels. Glasgow is known as the "Second City of the British Empire" for much of the Victorian era and Edwardian period. Today it is one of Europe's top ten financial centres and is home to many of Scotland's leading businesses. Glasgow is also ranked as the 57th most liveable city in the world.

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Glasgow

    the second city of the empire and the chief centre of industry in Scotland, is situated on the Clyde, in Lanarkshire, 45 m. W. from Edinburgh and 405 from London; it is conjectured that the origin of the name is found in Cleschu ("beloved green spot"), the name of a Celtic village which occupied the site previously, near which St. Mungo, or Kentigern, erected his church about A.D. 560; although a royal burgh in 1636, it was not till after the stimulus to trade occasioned by the Union (1707) that it began to display its now characteristic mercantile activity; since then it has gone forward by leaps and bounds, owing not a little of its success to its exceptionally favourable situation; besides the advantages of waterway derived from the Clyde, it is in the heart of a rich coal and iron district; spinning and weaving, shipbuilding, foundries, chemical and iron works, and all manner of industries, flourish; the city is spaciously and handsomely laid out; the cathedral (1197) is the chief building of historical and architectural interest; there is a university (1451) and a variety of other colleges, besides several public libraries and art schools; Glasgow returns seven members of Parliament.

Matched Categories

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Glasgow' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #2444

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Glasgow' in Written Corpus Frequency: #3189

How to pronounce Glasgow?

How to say Glasgow in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of Glasgow in Chaldean Numerology is: 8

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of Glasgow in Pythagorean Numerology is: 3

Examples of Glasgow in a Sentence

  1. Benjamin Strauss:

    World leaders have a fleeting opportunity to help or betray the future of humanity with their actions today on climate change, climate Impact Research in Germany and the images created from Climate Impact Research in Germany illustrate the enormous stakes behind the climate talks in Glasgow.

  2. Alok Sharma:

    2021 is absolutely going to be a critical year for climate, i want to see the golden thread of climate action woven through every international event on the road to Glasgow.

  3. Dipa Karmakar:

    There are barely any world class gymnastics facilities in the whole of India so in a small city like Agartala there was practically nothing, there were some locally made uneven bars in my small gym but they were the wrong size and looked nothing like the ones you see here in Glasgow.

  4. Jennifer Morgan:

    If the G20 was a dress rehearsal for COP26, then world leaders fluffed their lines, their communique was weak, lacking both ambition and vision, and simply failed to meet the moment. Now they move onto Glasgow where there is still a chance to seize a historic opportunity, but the likes of Australia and Saudi Arabia need to be marginalised, while rich countries need to finally grasp that the key to unlock COP26 is trust.

  5. Paul Elliott:

    We saw the same in Scotland around the Euros and visits to Wembley and matches in Glasgow, clearly it’s not just going to the match, but it’s going to the pub, being in close proximity.

Images & Illustrations of Glasgow

  1. GlasgowGlasgowGlasgowGlasgowGlasgow

Popularity rank by frequency of use

Glasgow#1#5215#10000

Translations for Glasgow

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    the formation of vesicles in or beneath the skin
    • A. witless
    • B. urban
    • C. blistering
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