What does Force mean?

Definitions for Force
fɔrs, foʊrsForce

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word Force.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. force(noun)

    a powerful effect or influence

    "the force of his eloquence easily persuaded them"

  2. force(noun)

    (physics) the influence that produces a change in a physical quantity

    "force equals mass times acceleration"

  3. force, forcefulness, strength(noun)

    physical energy or intensity

    "he hit with all the force he could muster"; "it was destroyed by the strength of the gale"; "a government has not the vitality and forcefulness of a living man"

  4. force, personnel(noun)

    group of people willing to obey orders

    "a public force is necessary to give security to the rights of citizens"

  5. military unit, military force, military group, force(noun)

    a unit that is part of some military service

    "he sent Caesar a force of six thousand men"

  6. violence, force(noun)

    an act of aggression (as one against a person who resists)

    "he may accomplish by craft in the long run what he cannot do by force and violence in the short one"

  7. power, force(noun)

    one possessing or exercising power or influence or authority

    "the mysterious presence of an evil power"; "may the force be with you"; "the forces of evil"

  8. force(noun)

    a group of people having the power of effective action

    "he joined forces with a band of adventurers"

  9. effect, force(noun)

    (of a law) having legal validity

    "the law is still in effect"

  10. force out, force-out, force play, force(verb)

    a putout of a base runner who is required to run; the putout is accomplished by holding the ball while touching the base to which the runner must advance before the runner reaches that base

    "the shortstop got the runner at second on a force"

  11. coerce, hale, squeeze, pressure, force(verb)

    to cause to do through pressure or necessity, by physical, moral or intellectual means :"She forced him to take a job in the city"

    "He squeezed her for information"

  12. impel, force(verb)

    urge or force (a person) to an action; constrain or motivate

  13. push, force(verb)

    move with force, "He pushed the table into a corner"

  14. force, thrust(verb)

    impose urgently, importunately, or inexorably

    "She forced her diet fads on him"

  15. wedge, squeeze, force(verb)

    squeeze like a wedge into a tight space

    "I squeezed myself into the corner"

  16. force, drive, ram(verb)

    force into or from an action or state, either physically or metaphorically

    "She rammed her mind into focus"; "He drives me mad"

  17. pull, draw, force(verb)

    cause to move by pulling

    "draw a wagon"; "pull a sled"

  18. force(verb)

    do forcibly; exert force

    "Don't force it!"

  19. storm, force(verb)

    take by force

    "Storm the fort"

Wiktionary

  1. Force(ProperNoun)

    Falls.

    Etymology: From fors. Cognate with Swedish fors

Webster Dictionary

  1. Force(verb)

    to stuff; to lard; to farce

    Etymology: [See Farce to stuff.]

  2. Force(noun)

    a waterfall; a cascade

    Etymology: [See Farce to stuff.]

  3. Force(noun)

    strength or energy of body or mind; active power; vigor; might; often, an unusual degree of strength or energy; capacity of exercising an influence or producing an effect; especially, power to persuade, or convince, or impose obligation; pertinency; validity; special signification; as, the force of an appeal, an argument, a contract, or a term

    Etymology: [See Farce to stuff.]

  4. Force(noun)

    power exerted against will or consent; compulsory power; violence; coercion

    Etymology: [See Farce to stuff.]

  5. Force(noun)

    strength or power for war; hence, a body of land or naval combatants, with their appurtenances, ready for action; -- an armament; troops; warlike array; -- often in the plural; hence, a body of men prepared for action in other ways; as, the laboring force of a plantation

    Etymology: [See Farce to stuff.]

  6. Force(noun)

    strength or power exercised without law, or contrary to law, upon persons or things; violence

    Etymology: [See Farce to stuff.]

  7. Force(noun)

    validity; efficacy

    Etymology: [See Farce to stuff.]

  8. Force(noun)

    any action between two bodies which changes, or tends to change, their relative condition as to rest or motion; or, more generally, which changes, or tends to change, any physical relation between them, whether mechanical, thermal, chemical, electrical, magnetic, or of any other kind; as, the force of gravity; cohesive force; centrifugal force

    Etymology: [See Farce to stuff.]

  9. Force(noun)

    to constrain to do or to forbear, by the exertion of a power not resistible; to compel by physical, moral, or intellectual means; to coerce; as, masters force slaves to labor

    Etymology: [See Farce to stuff.]

  10. Force(noun)

    to compel, as by strength of evidence; as, to force conviction on the mind

    Etymology: [See Farce to stuff.]

  11. Force(noun)

    to do violence to; to overpower, or to compel by violence to one;s will; especially, to ravish; to violate; to commit rape upon

    Etymology: [See Farce to stuff.]

  12. Force(noun)

    to obtain or win by strength; to take by violence or struggle; specifically, to capture by assault; to storm, as a fortress

    Etymology: [See Farce to stuff.]

  13. Force(noun)

    to impel, drive, wrest, extort, get, etc., by main strength or violence; -- with a following adverb, as along, away, from, into, through, out, etc

    Etymology: [See Farce to stuff.]

  14. Force(noun)

    to put in force; to cause to be executed; to make binding; to enforce

    Etymology: [See Farce to stuff.]

  15. Force(noun)

    to exert to the utmost; to urge; hence, to strain; to urge to excessive, unnatural, or untimely action; to produce by unnatural effort; as, to force a consient or metaphor; to force a laugh; to force fruits

    Etymology: [See Farce to stuff.]

  16. Force(noun)

    to compel (an adversary or partner) to trump a trick by leading a suit of which he has none

    Etymology: [See Farce to stuff.]

  17. Force(noun)

    to provide with forces; to reenforce; to strengthen by soldiers; to man; to garrison

    Etymology: [See Farce to stuff.]

  18. Force(noun)

    to allow the force of; to value; to care for

    Etymology: [See Farce to stuff.]

  19. Force(verb)

    to use violence; to make violent effort; to strive; to endeavor

    Etymology: [See Farce to stuff.]

  20. Force(verb)

    to make a difficult matter of anything; to labor; to hesitate; hence, to force of, to make much account of; to regard

    Etymology: [See Farce to stuff.]

  21. Force(verb)

    to be of force, importance, or weight; to matter

    Etymology: [See Farce to stuff.]

Freebase

  1. Force

    In physics, a force is any influence that causes an object to undergo a certain change, either concerning its movement, direction, or geometrical construction. In other words, a force can cause an object with mass to change its velocity, i.e., to accelerate, or a flexible object to deform, or both. Force can also be described by intuitive concepts such as a push or a pull. A force has both magnitude and direction, making it a vector quantity. It is measured in the SI unit of newtons and represented by the symbol F. The original form of Newton's second law states that the net force acting upon an object is equal to the rate at which its momentum changes with time. If the mass of the object is constant, this law implies that the acceleration of an object is directly proportional to the net force acting on the object, is in the direction of the net force, and is inversely proportional to the mass of the object. As a formula, this is expressed as: where the arrows imply a vector quantity possessing both magnitude and direction. Related concepts to force include: thrust, which increases the velocity of an object; drag, which decreases the velocity of an object; and torque which produces changes in rotational speed of an object. In an extended body, each part usually applies forces on the adjacent parts; the distribution of such forces through the body is the so-called mechanical stress. Pressure is a simple type of stress. Stress usually causes deformation of solid materials, or flow in fluids.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Force

    fōrs, Foss, fos, n. a waterfall. [Ice. foss, fors.]

  2. Force

    fōrs, v.t. (cook.) to stuff, as a fowl.—n. Force′meat, meat chopped fine and highly seasoned, used as a stuffing or alone. [A corr. of farce.]

The Standard Electrical Dictionary

  1. Force

    Force may be variously defined. (a) Any cause of change of the condition of matter with respect to motion or rest. (b) A measurable action upon a body under which the state of rest of that body, or its state of uniform motion in a straight line, suffers change. (c) It may be defined by its measurement as the rate of change of momentum, or (d) as the rate at which work is done per unit of space traversed. Force is measured by the acceleration or change of motion it can impart to a body of unit mass in a unit of time, or, calling force, F, mass, m acceleration per second a we have F = m a. The dimensions of force are mass (M) * acceleration (L/(T^2)) = (M*L)/(T^2).

Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms

  1. force

    1. An aggregation of military personnel, weapon systems, equipment, and necessary support, or combination thereof. 2. A major subdivision of a fleet.

Dictionary of Nautical Terms

  1. force

    A term which implies the sudden rush of water through a narrow rocky channel, and accompanied by a fall of the surface after the obstacle is passed. It is synonymous with fall. Also, the force of each ship stated agreeably to the old usage in the navy, according to the number of guns actually carried. In these days of iron-clads, turret-ships, and heavy guns, this does not give a true estimate of a ship's force. Also, the general force, ships, men, soldiers, &c., engaged in any expedition; as expeditionary force.--Also, force of wind, now described by numbers, 0 being calm, 12 the heaviest gale.--To force, is to take by storm; to force a passage by driving back the enemy.--Colloquially, no force--gently.

Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

  1. force

    In its military application, signifies an army of all branches,—artillery, cavalry, and infantry. It is sometimes used in the plural number, but with the same signification; as, “commander of the forces;” and occasionally we find the word used in another sense, thus, “He is in great force.” To force, in broadsword exercise, is to break an adversary’s sword-guard, and either wound him or expose him to a wound.

  2. force

    To obtain or win by strength; to take by violence or struggle; specifically, to capture by assault; to storm, as a fortress. Also to impel, drive, wrest, extort, get, etc., by main strength or violence; with a following adverb, as along, away, from, into, through, out, etc.

  3. force

    To provide with forces; to reinforce; to strengthen by soldiers; to garrison.

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Force' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #701

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Force' in Written Corpus Frequency: #1430

  3. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Force' in Nouns Frequency: #120

  4. Verbs Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Force' in Verbs Frequency: #201

How to pronounce Force?

  1. Alex
    Alex
    US English
    Daniel
    Daniel
    British
    Karen
    Karen
    Australian
    Veena
    Veena
    Indian

How to say Force in sign language?

  1. force

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of Force in Chaldean Numerology is: 7

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of Force in Pythagorean Numerology is: 2

Examples of Force in a Sentence

  1. Brian Encinia:

    Bland began swinging her elbows at me and then kicked my right leg in the shin. I had a pain in my right leg and suffered small cuts on my right hand. Force was used to subdue Bland to the ground to which Bland continued to fight back.

  2. Christine Caine:

    There is so much power in gathering together, in showing up in force and saying, There are more of us against slavery than for it, by coming together, on one day around the world, we believe awareness will spread and lead to the identification and restoration of people who are being exploited in vast numbers.

  3. Anuj Somany:

    The company's business has never doomed because of ground force or even of middle cadre people but because of top brass only.

  4. Tammy Duckworth:

    We must bring to bear the full force of U.S. sanctions against Russia as well as consider their expansion against broader sectors of the Russian economy, donald Trump must immediately cancel Donald Trump planned summit with Vladimir Putin until Russia demonstrates its willingness to come back into the community of nations that respect the rule of law, legal norms and democratic institutions.

  5. Francisco Garcia:

    The task force recommends that clinicians direct patients who smoke tobacco to other cessation interventions with established effectiveness and safety, many studies show that combinations of behavioral interventions or pharmacotherapies can help the most.

Images & Illustrations of Force

  1. ForceForceForceForceForce

Popularity rank by frequency of use

Force#1#1022#10000

Translations for Force

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

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